User Tag List

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 18 to 34 of 37
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Try to watch the vid again from 1:32 to 1:53, then compare it with ur vids. Can u see the different from preparing to hit the shot to finishing??
    Last edited by Phuong; 06-11-2008 at 03:59 PM.

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yes I see the difference in the backswing. I have a video of the two shot with narration. Hopefully it would clear things up. Sorry for the confusion Gollum.

    http://www.imeem.com/people/UymXifg/...arration_spor/

    I forgot to mention in the video that the shot is being made as if it is going back towards the railing.
    Last edited by KazeCloud; 06-11-2008 at 05:34 PM.

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    actually, they're both not correct(in ur vid of course). in the pro's vid he makes good use of his shoulders power to produce a lot more power in his shots. Ur on the other hand, don't use ur shoulder at all. If u watch it carefully u'll see that when the pro preparing to his the shot his left shoulder goes upward and his right shoulder goes downward making it look like this /. then he pushs his left shoulder downward and push his right shoulder upward in circular movement(kinda like when u paddle a boat) making it easier for his arm to go straight up 90 degree with lot of power. In ur vid when u preparing to hit the shot ur shoulders prefectly equal -- making it harder for u to make ur arm goes 90 degree. Notice that when u swing ur arm alway out to the side like this o_| instead of this o/ ( the o is ur head ). Hope this help

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Your right they aren't. I usually do that. But the reason why I wasn't performing that in the swing is because I was in slow motion and was trying to show you the certain part of the swing where I am having problem with. I am very happy you pointed that out and I'll remember that more. But can you answer my original question about how the racket travels towards the left of my head and body.

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's the elbow, in ur vid ur elbow goes a little to the back then as u swing ur elbow go out to ur right and straight forward. But in pro vid his elbow goes downward (point down), as he swing his elbow move in circular movement along with his shoulder upward making his racket automatic point to his left side of his head and body

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Do you mean my elbow moves in such a way where it points to the right side of my body while your suppose to make a semicircular path? That makes sense and it seems to be easier to imitate the racket pointing to the left doing so.

    Or should I just raise my elbow higher sooner? When I try to do that circular path it still feels awkward.
    Last edited by KazeCloud; 06-11-2008 at 07:55 PM.

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    alberta
    Posts
    83
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think you're over thinking this. There really isn't a "right way", more a way that works best for you. The backswing isn't as important as the moment of impact. If you're in the right position at that time, then you're all good. Look at golf. Tiger Woods, Ernie Els, pretty much text book swings. But then you have Chi Chi Rodriguez, Jim Furyk, John Daly, all have non-typical backswings but all get into the correct position at impact, the slot. If you can get there with your backswing, then you're good.

  8. #25
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Is that so Liint? I thought everything was extremely important. Hm. It sounds like its a really big deal though. Moving towards the left has a different whip feeling more than just pulling back. Thanks for your suggestion Liint.

  9. #26
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    alberta
    Posts
    83
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    That's just my opinion. You can think the mechanics to death, I think it's funner swinging the racket.

  10. #27
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Its fun to swing it. But its more fun to swing it correctly.

  11. #28
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's feel awkward may due to several reasons

    1. u not get use to it yet, practice the swing a little bit, give it time

    2. when u swing ur elbow upward along with ur right shoulder. At the same time u have to push ur left shoulder downward (if ur left shoulder stay still then of course it will feel awkward)

    3. just a guess:P, try to move ur leg forward when u swing??? from what i see from ur lower body in previous vid, u move ur right leg back as u prepare the swing then it stay there even after the swing.

  12. #29
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,879
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    That's a clearer video. You present well, by the way.

    Of the two, your second swing -- the "professional style" -- looks better. In both cases, however, you need a more active shoulder turn and a higher contact point. To complicate matters, the shoulder turn will only be fully effective if you get your feet off the ground during the swing.

    I don't like to teach the "racket goes behind the head" aspect of the swing, because it encourages players to adopt this as their preparation posture (the old "scratch your back" style of teaching the swing). The racket only passes behind the head/back momentarily, and it needs to flow into the next position; trying to force it to pass farther behind the head will lead to a loss of power.

    In my view, the key teaching points are the preparation posture, the halfway stage with the elbow still leading, and the final hitting stage when the arm uncoils forwards.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-12-2008 at 02:53 AM.

  13. #30
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks Gollum, I explain things all the time because I'm like half coach of the school and my other bad coach is just V#1 who isn't very good at teaching. Thats another reason why I want to learn so much.

    So now I can safely practice my second swing. I definitely understand how this would teach people to set their position up "scratching their backs", for I have taught people that now does that. About me setting up my position scratching my back, I'm past that already. So I just need to find the comfortable swing where my racket goes past the left side of my head by leading with my elbow? Doing so doesn't allow the racket to be as close to my back as usual, but will that come as I get more comfortable with the swing? Is the halfway stage elbow first or body turn first? Meaning should my elbow be a bit faster than my body turn or the same speed?
    Last edited by KazeCloud; 06-12-2008 at 01:11 PM.

  14. #31
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,879
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    Is the halfway stage elbow first or body turn first? Meaning should my elbow be a bit faster than my body turn or the same speed?
    I teach the half-way stage with the body about parallel to the net (so it's made about 90 degrees turn from side-on). The elbow is about its highest position, still leading the arm; but the arm is just about to uncoil.

    There is an inherent danger in over-analysing the technique, however. If you try to learn the technique by being absolutely precise (my elbow is open at exactly 140 degrees, and 5 degrees in front of my body, and the right foot lands 0.3 seconds after the left foot...), then it's difficult to learn because you are worrying about too many details and not learning the overall feel of the swing.

    Also, as a coach, I try to avoid giving unnecessarily specific advice because I might be wrong! A badminton swing is a complex movement; I cannot be confident that I have a perfect concept of every biomechanical detail.

    There's a balance between being too vague and being too detailed. Too vague, and you just dodge the question, leaving your student without any useful guidance; too detailed, and you are almost certain to say something wrong or misleading, and you also make it difficult for the student to learn by experimentation.

    My coaching style is somewhat unusual in that I believe it's valuable to give detailed instruction, and I believe that the obsession with "keep it simple" leads to us patronising players and withholding crucial information because we think it's too advanced. Nevertheless, it's important to recognise that not all details are good details.

    As a player, you may be at risk of being over-analytical. I say this because you follow every answer with another question -- a request for even more precise instruction. I feel (and this is only a hunch) that you are trying to gain skills by obtaining perfect knowledge of the technique, rather than actually practising it.

    Different players have different learning styles; like me, you are clearly very strong with verbal learning. That's great, but it can become a problem if it prevents you from learning by experimentation -- because, no matter how good your analytical skills, it's essential that you include some "learning by doing".

    This is actually a weakness of mine too (in general, not just badminton). I too have strong analytical and verbal skills (world class, actually ), so I tend to rely on them too much. I have a tendency to begin analysis too early (before I have enough data), and to continue it for too long (when further analysis is useless, and what's really needed is experimentation).

    In your practice (or in games), try to focus on one coaching point at a time, or at most two. To start with, I would recommend you focus on reaching up higher -- full relaxed reach.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-13-2008 at 03:48 AM.

  15. #32
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stockton, California
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks again Gollum, I understand completely. I realize I'm asking too much questions and over analyzing this technique. I will end it now because I actually have acquired enough information on the technique after:

    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    I teach the half-way stage with the body about parallel to the net (so it's made about 90 degrees turn from side-on). The elbow is about its highest position, still leading the arm; but the arm is just about to uncoil.
    I do physically practice it but only shadow practice. I don't have the resources and such to be in a gym.

    But now after I have all these information I think I can adequately practice and feel secure about my technique. Your right, anymore detail becomes too technical. I think I have reached that breakpoint. Your great Gollum. Now I'm off to reading your Badminton Bible's footwork on going to the forehand back court, and singles' tactic. That forehand back court is tough.

    Edit: Remembering and differentiating block jump, chasse, steps, and scissor jumps is hard too. I never remember which one is which when I'm performing them.
    Last edited by KazeCloud; 06-13-2008 at 03:58 AM.

  16. #33
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,879
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    I do physically practice it but only shadow practice. I don't have the resources and such to be in a gym.
    So you're practising lots of swings at home, then? That's a very limited form of practice (limited to the extent that it's almost useless).

    Shadow work is good up to a point (although it works best on a badminton court!), but you also need to hit a shuttle.

    If your resources don't permit you any practise time on court, try dedicating some of your club games to practising a particular technique. If possible, try not to worry about whether you win or lose -- just practise your technique.

    This isn't ideal, but it's better than nothing.

    Edit: Remembering and differentiating block jump, chasse, steps, and scissor jumps is hard too. I never remember which one is which when I'm performing them.
    Well, it doesn't matter too much if you forget the names.

    Again, you might want to focus on learning one thing at a time, until you feel comfortable with the technique.

  17. #34
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    West Lafayette
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    sorry if I am wrong or the video is manipulating my eyes.. I see that your racket face is not facing the front when u swing ur racket... it look like ur racket just cut through the air like a blade..

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Frequent overhead shot mishits
    By commonman00 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 3
    : 04-03-2009, 11:14 PM
  2. Video: My Overhead Swing
    By KazeCloud in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 25
    : 03-05-2008, 05:41 AM
  3. Who has the best overhead swing motion
    By ChocoChipWaffle in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 2
    : 07-31-2006, 05:08 PM
  4. My overhead swing
    By New_Guy04 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 7
    : 01-10-2005, 06:57 AM
  5. Replies: 18
    : 11-24-2003, 10:23 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •