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  1. #35
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    haha footimy, this is the first time that i've ever heard of tai chi badminton and that sounds cool but theres a concept that ur missing. Tai Chi and Badminton are two different elements. Your trying to say Tai Chi "IS" Badminton. Sry no its not, your only able to use the concepts IN tai chi to adapt with badminton but its not really called "Tai Chi" badminton. From my experiences with tai chi and wushu, tai chi takes years to be able to control a strong energy called "Chi" energy. Now Lin Dan and Peter Gade and all those other players you described about do not have the "Tai Chi" flow in them. They have techniques that doesn't require Tai Chi, it requires hardwork of training and years of practice. Tai Chi is a traditional chinese martial arts that is practiced in everyday lives in China and all around the world and yes it helps you with the mind, the body, and the spirit. BUT based on Tai Chi, your using Tai Chi to think better about your shots, thats where the mind kicks in, and the body is your fitness, and the spirit is your sportmenship. Now this "tai chi" shot your describing about... This is what it should be in a tai chi practitioner point of view. You can't use Tai Chi for drop shots, the only shots u could use the tai chi shot would be smash because in Tai Chi, you release the strong chi energy that you contain and release it, not force. So the key would be finding your center and utilize the force. It would be slow first then STRONG AND FAST at the end without using force because using force will cause the "flow" to seize. No offence but ur wikipedia search has failed you because they describe "force" so they lied to you.
    Last edited by Azianhero; 08-13-2008 at 09:06 PM.

  2. #36
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    Wu Tai Badminton is way better than Tai Chi Badminton.

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ad.php?t=58932

    Join The Wu Tai Force!

  3. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    Wu Tai Badminton is way better than Tai Chi Badminton.

    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...ad.php?t=58932

    Join The Wu Tai Force!
    Master KazeCloud! Please let me be your deciple ! otherwise i'll make a new form of badminton.. the shaolin style badminton.




  4. #38
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    Do not fall for the Shaolin Style Badminton. It is merely a gimmick!

    You will be my first deciple then.

    You are now apart of the Wu Tai Force.

  5. #39
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    I think Footimy is just using Tai Chi terms to describe the "hard and the soft" tactics/stategy in playing badminton efficiently. For example, he used the example of the smash, clear and the drop shot with efficiency and a movement that the opponent cannot say for sure whether it is going to be a cut smash or a full smash, or even a clear or a drop. Others call this deception. Yet there are others who say foot positions and arm movement for all these strokes should be similar. Different ways to skin a cat, I think.
    But Tai Chi is a body contact sport in which an opponent's force, like punching hard at you, can be used against him, because of the two fighters' close proximity to each other.
    However, in badminton the two opponents are quite far from each other. The use of a soft reaction to use an opponent's sheer power against himself is more limited, mainly to blocks, wrist flick return of smashes, slow drops, deception. But deception can work for both power and and the soft.
    I think you are using Tai Chi terms, where appropriate, to dramatically drill into your charges the complete repertoire of badminton strokes and tactics, which are a combination of power, speed, deception, and the very soft touch.
    In badminton there are two elements you must contend with. One is your own playing style. Everyone has his or her own style, whether it is aggressive, controlled, or a combination. You cannot and should not drastically change your playing style, because it is your own "character signature" dna. The other is your opponent. You must know your opponent's strength and weakness. There is no one game plan to play against all opponents. Sometimes if it requires more power to beat an opponent, why not?
    BTW, I met all the West Malaysian players on their way back from the World Chinese Championships in Southern China last Oct/Nov. They did not do too well that time, which they put down to poor lighting and poor logistics of having to play at various venues.

  6. #40
    Regular Member jhirata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    Do not fall for the Shaolin Style Badminton. It is merely a gimmick!

    You will be my first deciple then.

    You are now apart of the Wu Tai Force.
    We're spamming the hell outta here ..

    The better player is the one whose actions can not be read by the opponent. That's all deception to be realistic.

  7. #41
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    Hi Footimy, perhaps you can explain to us with a simple example. How about describing how one player does a straight reverse sliced drop shot with his forehand on the left side of the court, and the type of reply from his opponent, in your Tai Chi words? Pls explain the footwork, the hand/wrist/arm/body movement, of both strokes, and how Tai Chi is used by both.

  8. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    Hi Footimy, perhaps you can explain to us with a simple example. How about describing how one player does a straight reverse sliced drop shot with his forehand on the left side of the court, and the type of reply from his opponent, in your Tai Chi words? Pls explain the footwork, the hand/wrist/arm/body movement, of both strokes, and how Tai Chi is used by both.
    Taneepak, I think you misunderstood the topic.

    He's not here to explain how it works. He's just here to say he uses it, and that it does work..

  9. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerby View Post
    Taneepak, I think you misunderstood the topic.

    He's not here to explain how it works. He's just here to say he uses it, and that it does work..
    Let Footimy respond to this. In his opening thread, I believe he has extended an open invitation to us to visit his place where he will show us how it is done, the Tai Chi way.
    BTW, the part of Sabah where he lives is quite remote. I do travel to Sabah to bigger towns like Kota Kinabalu and Sandakan but I don't think I know how to get to his place.

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    Let Footimy respond to this. In his opening thread, I believe he has extended an open invitation to us to visit his place where he will show us how it is done, the Tai Chi way.
    BTW, the part of Sabah where he lives is quite remote. I do travel to Sabah to bigger towns like Kota Kinabalu and Sandakan but I don't think I know how to get to his place.

    I do... you either drive there or take a bus there. it's about 2hours from Kota Kinabalu. hehe~

  11. #45
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    waha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha you guys are great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. #46
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    Default A simple explanation of flow and pattern.

    Let us review what is "Tai Chi" definition in combat:

    "...appropriate change in response to outside forces; the study of yielding and blending with outside force rather than attempting to meet it with opposing force."

    In simple way to say, do not do what you can't do. For an example, if an opponent playing a speed and power game against you, and you do not have the speed and power to beat him, then do not force yourself play speed and power this will only lead to the faster defeat (in term of "tai chi badminton" concept in this example "outside force" is the speed and power of your opponent.)

    Instead trying to beat brute power with more brute what you can do is, first, blend yourself with his tactic ASAP or recognize his playing pattern. Then, lock his attacking force by using all the shot you have master especially,net shot, disguise shot, high lifting clear, drive shot, etc. When you are trying to locking his attack by the same time he is trying to make an attack move; this what we call "flow", "rhythm",or "pattern".

    When a "pattern" emerge in a game, the real problem comes in; you both stuck in the "pattern" until the end of the game. Now, this is the most difficult part in badminton, how to break the "flow", "pattern", or "rhythm" when you know your stuck in it?

  13. #47
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    Default Destroying flow

    Destroying flow is the most difficult skill in badminton, because when ever your are trying to change the flow, a new flow will always emerge, to destroy flow effectively this are the few things we need to constantly take care of

    1. Brain (for imagination before making a shot)
    2. Muscle tightness
    3. Time before hitting the shuttle
    4. Heartbeat
    5. Footwork ( the walking footwork )
    6. Body language
    7. You must understand how brain capture a pattern

    This 5 element is the same important as each other, fail to execute this 7 element in every shot your badminton play will like any other ordinary style. To destroy a flow 1st your brain must always know where is your opponent location, 2nd you arm muscle must be almost 100% relax, 3nd your hitting timing must be faster or slower significantly than usual, 4nd your can't be nervous your heartbeat must be normal, and 5nd your have the right footwork and body position, and lastly do not show any body language before making a hit.

    These flow destroying technique is very effective in tournament because almost everyone have a tight muscle when in under pressure.
    Last edited by footimy; 08-18-2008 at 11:20 AM.

  14. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by KazeCloud View Post
    How many people can use Tai Chi badminton effectively? How long can you destroy the pace?

    Destroying the rhythm and changing the rhythm is interchangeable...
    Not many people can use it, some people use it unconsciously, it is a very extremely hard technique, it was a fluke when i discovered it, destroying rhythm is the hardest thing to do.

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by footimy View Post
    Let us review what is "Tai Chi" definition in combat:

    "...appropriate change in response to outside forces; the study of yielding and blending with outside force rather than attempting to meet it with opposing force."

    In simple way to say, do not do what you can't do. For an example, if an opponent playing a speed and power game against you, and you do not have the speed and power to beat him, then do not force yourself play speed and power this will only lead to the faster defeat (in term of "tai chi badminton" concept in this example "outside force" is the speed and power of your opponent.)

    Instead trying to beat brute power with more brute what you can do is, first, blend yourself with his tactic ASAP or recognize his playing pattern. Then, lock his attacking force by using all the shot you have master especially,net shot, disguise shot, high lifting clear, drive shot, etc. When you are trying to locking his attack by the same time he is trying to make an attack move; this what we call "flow", "rhythm",or "pattern".

    When a "pattern" emerge in a game, the real problem comes in; you both stuck in the "pattern" until the end of the game. Now, this is the most difficult part in badminton, how to break the "flow", "pattern", or "rhythm" when you know your stuck in it?
    There are just too many other factors that determine who wins and who loses in a badminton match. All the Tai Chi will be of no avail if one player is not fit, or doesn't have the skills, or the most important of all doesn't have the intelligence vs the opponent. In a way "intelligence" is even more important, as it can adopt some elements of Tai Chi if appropriate and dump Tai Chi for skills if it is more advantageous. Even intelligence by itself may not be good enough if the disparity in skills is too wide.
    Let us use the Lin Dan vs LCW Olympic finals match. Do you think Tai Chi would have helped LCW?

  16. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    Hi Footimy, perhaps you can explain to us with a simple example. How about describing how one player does a straight reverse sliced drop shot with his forehand on the left side of the court, and the type of reply from his opponent, in your Tai Chi words? Pls explain the footwork, the hand/wrist/arm/body movement, of both strokes, and how Tai Chi is used by both.
    first of all, before making the shot you must do all the thing in "destroying flow" thread. Now, when the shuttle is high enough to make the straight reverse sliced drop, go beneath the shuttle landing point, relax your whole muscle and wait for a while (wait until your opponent guessing) hit it faster or slower; different timing than u usually do. Hit the shuttle with different timing every time, flow will be broken!! Usually the reply will be either the opponent is not moving at all or the reply will be a net shot.

  17. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    There are just too many other factors that determine who wins and who loses in a badminton match. All the Tai Chi will be of no avail if one player is not fit, or doesn't have the skills, or the most important of all doesn't have the intelligence vs the opponent. In a way "intelligence" is even more important, as it can adopt some elements of Tai Chi if appropriate and dump Tai Chi for skills if it is more advantageous. Even intelligence by itself may not be good enough if the disparity in skills is too wide.
    Let us use the Lin Dan vs LCW Olympic finals match. Do you think Tai Chi would have helped LCW?
    Yes I mosly agree with you, like I said, Tai Chi is a high level skill play, you can only play tai chi effectively when you already master all the shot.

    I saw the final match between LCW and Lin Dan in Beijing Olympic on tv, the only reason why LCW lost badly to Lin Dan is because Lin Dan does't have any "flow", "pattern", "rhythm" in his game and LCW is guessing all the time. Yes I believe "Tai Chi" would helped LCW to higher his chance to beat Lin Dan.

    Long ago before the match, LCW said to the one of the Malaysia commentator: "To beat Lin Dan, we must have calm and patience" at that night obviously he wasn't calm and patient. Calm and patient is one of the element in Tai Chi.

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