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Thread: Singles' serve

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    Question Singles' serve

    Not too long ago most singles matches would see the server serve the shuttle all the way to the back and anticipate a smash or drop or etc. However nowadays we seldom see that.

    Is it because of the improment in players' skills, power and precision that smashes are now harder to recieve and theerfore less advantageous to serve high and far or it is because of the development of equipment like the MP that gives this improvement in power and precision.

    Anyone care to comment?

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    Default A theory

    Although I wouldn't go as far as saying that the long singles serve is rare today, I do agree with you that the short singles serve has become more common. Actually, this is a rather recent change, and I think the 5x7 system could be part of the explanation. Many players have adopted a more aggressive style of play under this system, and the offensive short serve suits them better. The long serve is by definition a more defensive alternative.

    So, all in all, I think it has little to do with a change in players skills or development of new technology. I strongly doubt that today's players smash much harder or with more precision than 10 (or even 20) years ago. Rather it is an effect of a change of tactics to better suit the scoring system.

    Perhaps we will see a "normalization" after a while under the good old 3x15 system?

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    ye true, i see more and more short serves in singles games because when you give a long serve you can get the shuttle back in every place on the field even fast. if you give a short serve you can stand more on the front of the field to accept a drop back and if he give high you have time enough to give the shuttle in the back of his field

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    The best thing to do is use variation, in my opinion and experience. Constantly alternating your playing style in a game will prevent your opponent read what kind of gamestyle you play.

    A good long, high back serve, would do great in Singles games, as it allows you to get ready for the shot coming to you. When the shuttle is at the very end of the court, and falls straight down on your opponent, your opponent will require his own strength to hit the shuttle, rather than rebounding off your shot. Another thing is that when serving that far back, smashing becomes a risk, as there is less control from smashing that far back (unless you smash straight into the centre). Most players would play smart and either lob back, or drop.

    A good low, short serve could work great if you can anticipate the next shot, however, if you can't, it could put you on a weak defensive position.

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    Default Singles serve

    the 1st time that i saw the low short serve used extensively in singles play was back in the late 80s when Morten Frost was playing Yang Yang in the Beijing Open finals. Yang Yang's vertical (leap) on his jump smash was so devastating that he could hit winners on many if not most high serves.

    many world class players since Yang Yang have developed this jumping/smashing ability. predominantly short serves against these players makes a lot of sense. however, for the rest of us mere mortals, the high deep serve is still very effective.

    Altho' I don't play singles all that often anymore, I still use the high deep serve 70 to 80% of the time when playing singles.

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    Default

    Originally posted by dNA3d
    The best thing to do is use variation, in my opinion and experience. Constantly alternating your playing style in a game will prevent your opponent read what kind of gamestyle you play.

    A good long, high back serve, would do great in Singles games, as it allows you to get ready for the shot coming to you. When the shuttle is at the very end of the court, and falls straight down on your opponent, your opponent will require his own strength to hit the shuttle, rather than rebounding off your shot. Another thing is that when serving that far back, smashing becomes a risk, as there is less control from smashing that far back (unless you smash straight into the centre). Most players would play smart and either lob back, or drop.

    A good low, short serve could work great if you can anticipate the next shot, however, if you can't, it could put you on a weak defensive position.
    of course, there is also the drive serve and the flick serve.... seriously, you can win with just serving (or the shot after) if you play against someone unexperienced..

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    When I started playing in the 1970s, it was taught that the singles serve should be made as high and deep and close to the center line as possible. The idea was that since the serve is basically a defensive shot, you wanted to take away as much from your opponent's return as possible. Nevertheless, your opponent did have the option of hitting an offensive shot and, in some cases, smash a less-than-ideal serve for an outright winner (Charley Coakley was the best at this back then). I think the current popularity of the short serve in singles is an attempt to take away any offensive opportunity from the receiver, as a reasonably good short serve will have to be contacted below net level and result in some kind of lift shot, which gives the server the first opportunity at hitting a true offensive shot.

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    Default Re: Singles serve

    Originally posted by gregr999
    the 1st time that i saw the low short serve used extensively in singles play was back in the late 80s when Morten Frost was playing Yang Yang in the Beijing Open finals. Yang Yang's vertical (leap) on his jump smash was so devastating that he could hit winners on many if not most high serves.

    many world class players since Yang Yang have developed this jumping/smashing ability. predominantly short serves against these players makes a lot of sense. however, for the rest of us mere mortals, the high deep serve is still very effective.

    Altho' I don't play singles all that often anymore, I still use the high deep serve 70 to 80% of the time when playing singles.
    The WC finals Frost/Yang Yang was the first time I saw the backhand low serve used extensively but I'm not sure whether that was the first time. The backhand serve is only a variation on the forehand low serve after all so perhaps players were comfortable with the forehand low serve up until that point in time.

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    A low backhand serve for singles is an interesting shot. It has an great number of variations under close control of the server. Long into the body, short to make opponent stretch, out wide, to the middle, drive, flick. It's one of my favourite shots to try and start controlling the rally.

    Since many, many players are used to receiving high serve in singles, when faced with a good backhand serve in singles, it needs a few points to adjust.

    Having said that, in one tournament, I played singles againgst a good doubles player. He was really good at returning the low serve causing me a lot of difficulty. So I tried sending up the traditional high serve and found he wasn't so good at returning this serve. It can easily happen the other way round so I'd advocate being proficient at both.

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    Default

    yes, the more arsenals that one has the better

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    I play singles regularly and mix the service up, but depending on how the opponent deals with each type.

    I prefer using the backhand serve as I find it is easy to be deceptive by using either a low serve or a good flick right to the rearcourt.

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    Wink

    the guy who taught me - not so many years ago - taught me that the best, and most disguisable way to serve, was the backhand serve... you can flick, or do a net serve - and with practice can easily conceal from the opposition what you're doing

    Sounds like you know what you're talking about babes..

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    well, the danger about flick and drive serves though, is that if the opponent reacts quickly, or is expecting it, you're in trouble...

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    Frankly, I don't know why a backhand serve should be any more deceptive than a forehand serve. On the forehand serve--doubles style--you bring the arm forward with the wrist slightly cocked. Whether you serve short, deep, or drive depends on what you do with the wrist at the last moment.

    I remember when the backhand serve started to become popular in the US. There were basically three reasons:
    (1) With the backhand serve, you could contact the shuttle closer to the net;
    (2) hitting the serve out in front of the body gave a better line of sight to the net and gave some players more control.
    These two may be generally true, but I have seen players who can come close to this with a forehand serve, holding it out in front of them and using all wrist.
    (3) Back then, players wore white, and the idea was that a white shuttle hit out of a white background would be harder to see. Now, with players wearing all kinds of colors, that is no longer a factor.

    Personally, I use the backhand serve in doubles, and the forehand serve in mixed and singles, but hey! I'm from the "old school," what can I say.

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    hehe... same here, forehand for singles, backhand for doubles... but i sometimes change it up, because i can do short serves, drive serves and flick serves much better with my backhand... (they're still ok with forehand, but better with backhand) so i sometimes change it up if i know a flick or a drive serve will catch my opponent off guard..

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    Hi,

    True. Alot of the player no days at internaational level do play this low flat serve. I feel that, maybe i'm wrong in a way. But when you play a low flat serve, your already in a good position (in the middle) and also there is no direct threat. With a high serve people can do much more, smashing, clears, drops, slices and with the high serve there are these threats.
    But if you think about it, with a low flat serve the most they can do is drop and lift, sometimes even cross court. So i feel it's on the basis that with a low flat serve there are limited threats and shots the opponent can do.

    Matt

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    well matt, if you do a drive serve, it's actually quite possible for them to drive it back, which is often an excellent shot because they are standing close to the net... I personally use the drive serve and flick serve sparingly... unless i'm kicking ass with it

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