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  1. #1
    Regular Member adelina76's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Hooray..Back to the old points system..BUT!!!

    I just found out that IBM has revert back to the old point system of 3x15 which is good..always thought the 7x5 was a bit silly..BUT..

    I am sooooooo annoyed that they are going to reduce the points for women's doubles and mix doubles to ELEVEN (11) points!! What are they thinking! That's downright sexism and discrimination! Okey, fine, for telecasting purposes, I can understand that watching the women's doubles isn't exactly heart pumping and stopping event, (although I always thought watching Gei Fei and Gei Chun from China playing doubles were very entertaining), still, it is not fair!!!! It is bad enough they dont' think we are good enough to play to 15 points in the singles, but to reduce women's doubles to 11 points? It's an outrage! GRRRRRRRRR...

    sorry.. just needed to vent that frustration..*POUT*

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    the IBF committee seems to have trouble explaining the decision. here is the minutes from the AGM (annual general meeting) held in Guangzhou during the TC/UC. i haven't read the whole thing, perhaps someone can read through it and try to make some sense out of the decision:

    MINUTES of the INTERNATIONAL BADMINTON FEDERATION
    ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
    held in the Garden Hotel, Guangzhou (CHN)
    at 10 hours on SUNDAY 12 MAY 2002

    PRESIDENTS OPENING REMARKS
    1. The President welcomed everyone to Guangzhou for the 2002 Annual General Meeting of the International Badminton Federation. The President thanked the China Badmin-ton Association and the Guangzhou Organising Committee of the 2002 Thomas and Uber Cups for all their hard work and preparations towards staging the event.
    2. The President acknowledged that some delegates might find the AGM a difficult envi-ronment in which to make a contribution, but urged all those present to participate fully in the meetings proceedings. The President highlighted to delegates the fact that there were several important items included on the order paper and that their votes and opinions were also very important.
    3. The President took the opportunity to recap on the programme he had established upon election as IBF President in Seville, Spain:
    Increased visibility
    4. Throughout the year, with the assistance of the Executive Board, the President had be-en working to raise the visibility of badminton in the eyes of the world. The United Na-tions had established a programme to promote sport as a means of bringing world pe-ace and the President was pleased to report that badminton could be officially inclu-ded in this programme. The President had travelled to Guangzhou directly from a UN meeting in New York during which he had the opportunity to meet UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and examine ways in which badminton could cooperate worldwi-de with the nine UN agencies. The Executive Board and the Chief Executive had been charged with pursuing this.
    5. Badminton was one of the 28 Olympic sports included on the Olympic programme for Athens and Beijing, and the President was committed to ensuring that badminton would retain its Olympic status during the years to come. Along with the other ASOIF sports, the IBF was in dialogue with ASOIF President Mr Denis Oswald on how they could work together to their mutual benefit, and the President was particularly keen to pro-gress the issue of the allocation of Olympic funds among the sports.
    6. During a recent visit to Guangzhou the President had met with IOC President Dr Jacques Rogge and he would continue his dialogue with Dr Rogge and other IOC members for the benefit of badminton. The President appealed to the Member Asso-ciations and delegates for their participation in this campaign by working to raise awareness of badminton with IOC members.
    7. Sandra Baldwin, President of the US Olympic Committee, had accepted the Presidents invitation to join the badminton family in Guangzhou, and during meetings scheduled for the following week the President would pursue ways of promoting badminton in the US through national sports bodies and the television network NBC (USA Rights Holder for the 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games).
    IBF Coaches programme
    8. During the next year IBF-appointed coaches would be made available to all Member Associations to assist with their development programmes. Chair of Development Committee Federico Valdez was currently finalising details.
    Continental Confederations
    9. Since Seville the President had visited all five continents, except for Africa. He reaffir-med his commitment to strengthening the operation and efficiency of the continental offices.
    Executive Board
    10. The Executive Board had met three times during the previous eleven months (a fourth meeting had been cancelled due to the events of September 11). The President commented that much had been achieved and expressed the belief that still more would be done during the next three years.
    SCRUTINEERS
    11. Mme Lu Shengrong (Immediate Past President), Roy Ward (Honorary Life Vice-President) and Roger Johansson (Vice-President) were appointed scrutineers.
    ATTENDANCE
    12. An attendance list is attached at Annex A. There were 110 Member Associations pre-sent with a total voting strength of 202.
    MINUTES OF 2001 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
    13. The minutes of the meeting held in Seville, Spain on 3 June 2001 had been circulated and were agreed. There were no matters arising.
    COUNCIL and COMMITTEE REPORTS for the year ending 31 December 2001
    14. The President invited comments on the Report of Council and its Committees.
    15. Hans Henrik Fløe (Denmark) was pleased to see that some much-needed changes were in progress, but highlighted the need to look at further ways to modernise badmin-ton. He underlined the need for badminton to grow and adapt to meet the new chal-lenges of an increasingly competitive international sports market, and warned that if badminton was unable to give people what they wanted then it would lose its sponsors and its popularity around the world to other sports that could.
    16. There being no further comment, the reports were approved.
    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS for the year ending 31 December 2001
    17. Tong Wai Lun (Chair of Finance Committee) presented the financial statements detai-led on pages 20-27 of the Annual Report and invited questions. There being no queries, the Financial Statements for the year ending 31 December 2001 were adopted.
    BUDGETS for 2002 and 2003
    18. Tong Wai Lun directed the delegates to the erratum that had been issued to replace the incorrectly presented budgets printed on page 18 of the Annual report, and the budgets for 2002 and 2003 were then adopted.
    COUNCIL ELECTIONS
    Vice-Presidents
    19. Torsten Berg, Federico Valdez and Charoen Wattanasin were elected and would each serve a term of three years in office.
    Continental Representatives
    20. The following were elected and would each serve a term of two years in office:
    Tong Wai Lun(Asian Badminton Confederation)
    Cephas Lar(African Badminton Federation)
    Federico Valdez(Panamerican Badminton Confederation)
    Council
    21. There followed a ballot for the six vacancies on Council. The results of the ballot would be announced under item 14 of the Order Paper.
    SUBSCRIPTION
    22. It was agreed that the subscription should remain at US$200 per unit for the year 2003.
    RULES OF THE FEDERATION
    23. Torsten Berg (Chair of Administration Committee) formally presented the three propo-sals listed under item 6 on the Order Paper. The amendments to Rules 14.8.1 and 14.10 were approved.
    24. In response to a query from Robin Bryant (Australia) over the measures proposed under item 6.3 of the Order Paper, the Chief Executive explained that the current rules were needed for IBF to purchase property in the UK. The deletion of Rule 19 and addition of new Rule 5.2.12 were subsequently adopted.
    LAWS OF BADMINTON
    Revised Laws
    25. Torsten Berg presented the proposed new Laws that the Administration (Rules & Laws) Committee had assembled during the previous four years. A number of drafts had be-en widely circulated for comment during this time and he thanked Member Associa-tions, Court Officials and others for their contributions. If accepted, the Laws would come into force on 1 August 2002.
    26. Torsten Berg explained that the new set of Laws were mainly a simplification of those already in use but highlighted the following changes:
    -Law 1.4 now stated that "Posts shall not extend into the court"
    -the provision under Law 2.9 for modifications to be made to shuttles because of special circumstances had been removed due to redundancy.
    -Laws 12 and 14 had been rewritten and simplified.
    -Appendix 3 included provision to play one game of 21 points, or 5 games of 7 points.
    -Minor changes had been made to Appendix 4 "Umpires vocabulary" and to the Recommendations to Court Officials.
    Torsten Berg concluded by saying that the changes would not affect the nature of badminton but merely make the Laws easier to understand and apply. The revised Laws were adopted.
    Five Games to Seven Points
    27. Torsten Berg explained the background to Councils proposal to adopt the new scoring system of 5x7. Badminton faced tough competition from other sports, many of which had already made changes, eg to their laws and/or their equipment, while retaining their core values. Badminton was therefore seeking to address this concern and address the issue raised by a number of IOC personnel, who had stated that the sports that would survive would be those that were able to adapt.
    As a trained scientist in his professional life Torsten Berg had used standard scientific principles to review the success of the 5x7 experiment, as presented in Annex D to the Order Paper.
    He concluded that the 5x7 experiment had achieved a considerable number of its objectives, following its thorough testing at tournaments around the world:
    - it produced more critical points and consequently more exciting matches
    - it had reduced the average match length by 20-25%. Matches were shorter still where opponents were unevenly matched, although close matches could still last more than one hour.
    - the system was easier to follow for spectators (especially new spectators), although still more could be done.
    However, not all the targets had been reached:
    -there had been some increased interest among the media and public, but this would not be a long-term phenomenon, probably lasting only until 5x7 became the established system
    -there was no evidence to show that TV coverage had exploited the increased number of breaks offered by 5x7.
    Torsten Berg reminded the meeting that if 5x7 was adopted there would still be a provi-sion for 3x15 to continue as an alternate scoring system at non-IBF sanctioned events
    28. The President explained that amendments to the Council proposal had been received from the Danish Badminton Association (DBF) and the Badminton Association of Eng-land (BA of E). Representatives of each association were invited to explain their amendments.
    29. Hans Henrik Fløe (Denmark) stated that the most important issue was not which scoring system should be adopted but that there should be a change. Mr Fløe strongly belie-ved that a change was necessary if badminton was to maintain and increase its po-pularity over the next 20-30 years. Mr Fløe called on the meeting to support the Presi-dent who had expressed his desire to work for change. He then withdrew the DBF amendment and proposed that the AGM establish whether or not there existed a de-sire for change and, if so, that Council be tasked with finding the right system.
    30. Eraj Wijesinghe (Sri Lanka) pointed out that it was a critical time for badminton as it was considering changing a fundamental part of the game. The different amendments proposed and the comments at the meeting showed that badminton was still not fully ready to make a change so Mr Wijesinghe proposed that a vote on changing the sco-ring system be postponed.
    31. Stephen Baddeley (England) argued that change was essential for badminton to survi-ve as a TV and Olympic sport. Mr Baddeley proposed withdrawing the BA of E amendment and asked that Council produce a new proposal.
    32. Robin Bryant (Australia) commented that although the events run by Oceania mem-bers were smaller they still showed that change would be welcomed. He expressed sympathy for the BA of E and DBF amendments believing that 5x7 was good but that other systems could be better still. He was reluctant to support a change to 5x9 without having any detailed information about the pros and cons of the system.
    Mr Bryant asked that the matter be passed to Council to look at all the options availa-ble, including 5x9, with the possibility of using different scoring systems for different pur-poses or levels of play.
    33. Cedric Baxter (Oceania) reported that he was happy with any of the new scoring sy-stem options as long as there was a change from the 3x15 system.
    34. However, Mr Baxter explained that he had long been a supporter of womens rights and equality for both sexes, and the 5x7 system (in which both men and women would use the same system) would be a big step in the right direction.
    35. Punch Gunalan (Nepal) spoke on behalf of his Asian colleagues. Mr Gunalan pointed out that the discussion papers on new scoring systems had largely come from Europe and he wished to present the Asian perspective on 5x7, which Asian players found to be too short, of benefit only to attacking players, and which favoured the use of only three strokes (serve, spin and smash) to the detriment of more balanced play.
    36. Datuk Gunalan agreed that change was necessary but questioned whether altering the scoring system was the only way to achieve this and suggested sitting down with the TV companies to find out what they really wanted from badminton.
    37. Datuk Gunalan proposed empowering Council to make a decision on the system to be used.
    38. Torsten Berg said that he would like to see continue the unity demonstrated by the election of the President in Seville. He therefore agreed, if it was the clear wish of the AGM, that the Council proposal could also be withdrawn and the matter referred to Council.
    39. As some delegates indicated they were confused as to where the decision-making process had reached, the Chief Executive said that it was being proposed to refer the matter to Council and empower it to make the final decision.
    40. The President explained that a 2/3 majority of the votes was required to change the laws, unless the AGM mandated Council to decide on its behalf. He emphasised to the AGM that it would need to be bound by the Council decision if the matter was referred to Council. The AGM approved that Council should review the matter and decide which scoring system would be adopted. The President confirmed that Council would decide on the scoring system at its scheduled meeting on 18 May.
    41. At this point the meeting was adjourned for a coffee break.
    SUDIRMAN CUP REGULATIONS
    42. Jeff Robson (Chair of Events Committee) formally presented the proposal to amend Sudirman Cup Regulations 3 and 4.5.3. These were approved.
    43. Mr Robson formally presented the proposal to replace Sudirman Cup Regulation 16, which would allow Council to make amendments to the Sudirman Cup regulations. This measure would provide Council with the greater flexibility necessitated by the advan-ced planning and notice required by sponsors, TV and host organisers of any changes to the competition format.
    Anne Smillie (Scotland) confirmed her association had no objection to Council making minor amendments provided the AGM continued to be involved in decisions on any major changes, eg to reduce the number of competing countries.
    This was approved.
    WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS REGULATIONS
    44. Jeff Robson formally presented the proposals to delete Regulation 5.3 and amend Re-gulation 12. These were approved.
    THOMAS & UBER CUP REGULATIONS
    45. Jeff Robson formally presented the proposals to amend Regulations 4.5.3 and 17. These were approved.
    INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATION
    46. Torsten Berg presented Councils proposal to strengthen the current regulations on in-ternational representation.
    47. At the Presidents request, Stephen Baddeley (England) presented his associations amendment to the Council proposal. Mr Baddeley explained that, although Councils initiative was welcome, the BA of E felt that it was necessary to make the control even stricter in order to protect the integrity of international badminton competition, and that their amendment would achieve this. Their amendment was seconded by Hans Henrik Fløe, DBF.
    48. There followed a discussion on the merits of strengthening the control on international representation and player movement.
    49. The BA of E amendment was passed by a majority of 101 to 69 votes.
    50. The amended proposal was adopted with a majority of 91 votes to 72.
    51. The Chief Executive clarified that since the BA of E amendment did not specify an im-plementation date it was assumed that the date would be the same as for Councils proposal, ie 1 August 2002. Council would establish the transitional measures to be used and these would be communicated to Member Associations without delay.
    DECLARATION ON INTEGRITY OF MATCHES
    52. The Chief Executive explained that a number of sports had suffered from allegations that players and/or officials had taken actions which were not permitted by the rules of the sport, eg "fixing" a match result. The declaration on the Order Paper was designed to pre-empt such an occurrence within badminton. This was adopted.
    AUDITORS
    53. Tong Wai Lun (Chair of Finance) explained that the current auditors KPMG had restruc-tured their organisation so that the auditing responsibilities would be assumed by a limi-ted liability partnership within the company. Tong Wai Lun confirmed that this was an internal change to KPMG and would not affect the quality of their audit work, and mo-ved to accept the resignation of KPMG and appointment of KPMG LLP as the new au-ditors. This was agreed.
    COUNCIL ELECTION RESULT
    54. The result of the Council elections were as follows:
    1.Rudy Hartono (Indonesia)201
    2.Li Lingwei (China)199
    3.Eraj Wijesinghe (Sri Lanka) 194
    4.Heather Nielsen (England)190
    5.Puzant Kassabian (Bulgaria)187
    6.Edgar Aglipay (Philippines)178
    7.Robin Bryant (Australia) 57

    55. The top six nominees were thereby elected and would each serve a term of two years in office.
    56. The President took the opportunity to thank previous Council members Yang Shuan, Hiranmay Ray and Dr James Sekajugo for their contribution to Council over the years.
    OLYMPIC GAMES 2004
    57. George Georgoudis, ATHOC Competition Manager for Badminton, confirmed that he would attend each AGM up until the 2004 Games and then reported on progress for the badminton event in Athens. Full details of his presentation can be found at Annex B.
    BIENNIAL CONGRESS
    58. Torsten Berg explained that the paper circulated in advance of the meeting sought to examine ways of maximising the benefits available from the AGM. He acknowledged that the thought of speaking to a room of more than 100 people could prevent some people from speaking freely and so it was necessary to find other means (such as smaller open forums or discussion groups) of increasing the dialogue between Council and delegates, and between delegates themselves. An additional option might to hold the AGM once every two years in the hope that more Member Associations could find the necessary funds to send a representative to the meeting.
    59. Cedric Baxter (Oceania Badminton Confederation) strongly supported any measures aimed at encouraging the participation of delegates, but argued that to hold the Ge-neral Meeting once every two years was not acceptable.
    60. Anne Smillie (Scotland) agreed that open forums could provide smaller associations with an excellent opportunity to learn from their more experienced colleagues in areas such as event organisation. However, it was vital that the AGM be held every 12 months as it was the occasion when Council reported to and was accountable to the Federations members.
    61. Torsten Berg thanked the delegates for their contributions and advised that the Admini-stration committee would in due course ask the members for their opinions in writing.
    OTHER BUSINESS
    Pearl River Boat Trip
    62. The Chief Executive advised that the Guangzhou Organising Committee had arranged a boat trip on the Pearl River to which all delegates had been invited. Transport would be leaving the hotel at 18:50 and a buffet would be provided on the boat.
    Delegates arrangements
    63. Delegates were reminded that they should settle any outstanding bills for accommoda-tion directly with the organisers in room 509. Other incidental expenses should be paid to the hotel.
    64. Delegates were asked to confirm their departure details with the Organising Committee so that places in the accredited seating at the hall could be released.
    NEXT MEETING
    65. It was agreed that the 2003 AGM would be held in May in Birmingham, England at the time of the World Championships. Detailed notice of the meeting would be sent to members in due course.
    END OF MEETING
    66. The President brought the meetings attention to the fact that Immediate Past President Mme Lu Shengrong had been awarded the IOCs Silver Order and Mme Lu was warmly applauded.
    Mme Lu explained that the award was really for badminton as she had only received it because of the opportunity that she had been given by the Member Associations and delegates when they elected her IBF President.
    67. The President highlighted the fact that badminton still had work to do to meet the IOCs quotas on womens representation in its administration. He urged the Member Associa-tions to look for opportunities to help Council reach this quota.

    MB/NC
    28 May 2002
    Korn Dabbaransi / President International Badminton Federation

  3. #3
    Regular Member adelina76's Avatar
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    Question Huh?

    Hey Kwun, unless I just missed something, this minutes did not mention anything at all about IBF's new decision to revert back to the 15x3 and the shocking decision on the women's doubles and mix doubles scoring format..

    Also, interesting that the minutes mentioned that Datuk Punch Gunalan is from Nepal *ROFL* Err...he's actually a Malaysian and ex Malaysian Badminton Federation President..doh! FYI, Datuk is a title ..kind of like Sir under the English system

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    Angry Can't agree more

    Hi,

    I am a big fan of doubles and i love playing both. I'm pleased the mens doubles is back to 15x3, but i also love the mixed. I play alot of mixed and i am VERY dissapointed in the change to 11x3. I have had many great comebacks from say 11-7 down. They seriously need to rethink what they are doing. I am very angry at this change and i can't see what the trouble with 15x3 for all except womens singles was!

    Matt

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    There is really no basis for women playing to 11 pts. instead of 15. It probably goes back to the idea that somehow it would be harmful to women to play as long as the men. Look how long it took to get a women's marathon race into the Olympics. The old ways are slow to change.

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    this is just a guess.

    the number of point in a game completely do not reflect the length of the game. ladies doubles rallies are much much longer than men's double rallies. and as a result, i think the average length and probably maximum length of a LD game is longer than a MD game. the change to 11 point is probably trying to solve that issue instead of the fitness level, etc, of the average lady.

    in other words, even though there is less points, the actual duration of the game can be similar.

    could that be a plausible explanation?

    we have seen 2 hours games in LD before, i can't remember the last time i saw a MD game go for longer than 1.5 hours.

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    Default kwun

    yes, i think that was IBF's explaination. However, i see 2 sides of this ruling.

    The positive:
    1. to balance out the duration of men and ladies games in hope to attract TV networkk people (which ironically ibf didn't consult with them in the first place as noted by bip)

    Negative:

    1. Badminton might be viewed as a sexist sport
    2. Two scoring system may add confusion to new and potential viewing audience.

    It's almost like 1 step forward and 2 steps back.
    Last edited by cooler; 06-13-2002 at 03:45 PM.

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    Regular Member adelina76's Avatar
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    Angry Still..the point here is..

    Originally posted by kwun
    this is just a guess.

    the number of point in a game completely do not reflect the length of the game. ladies doubles rallies are much much longer than men's double rallies. and as a result, i think the average length and probably maximum length of a LD game is longer than a MD game. the change to 11 point is probably trying to solve that issue instead of the fitness level, etc, of the average lady.

    in other words, even though there is less points, the actual duration of the game can be similar.

    could that be a plausible explanation?

    we have seen 2 hours games in LD before, i can't remember the last time i saw a MD game go for longer than 1.5 hours.
    Just as there's 2 hours games in LD, there have also been 2 hour games for MD, so why the discrimination?

    I hear what you're saying Kwun..however, the length of time spent in WD should not be the basis for the change in the point system given that the long rallies that WD come up with are part and parcel of the WD games that goes to the intricacy of playing WD..ie, if in the MD, you see lots of smashing and defending as the nature of the mens' doubles, then long rallies followed by intelligent placing of the shuttles would be the signature of the WD games. In addition, you surely cannot justify them sustaining the 11x3 format for the WS by saying that the length of time for WS under this format is simlar to the length of time played in a MS..if the length of time is used as a basis for this change, then MS should be reduced to 11x3 format and the WS increased to 15x3 given that the MS matches are generally much longer than the WS.

    Besides, international players aside, in your normal social inter club or even at the state/ provincial level, I doubt WD matches will go for 2 hours in these local type competitions..but by reducing it to 11x3, it will surely take away the enjoyment of the WD.

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    Kwun,

    Whats your views on the 11x3 for mixed? I know your a keen mixed player and i'm angered at this change. Whats your view?

    Matt

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    36. Datuk Gunalan agreed that change was necessary but questioned whether altering the scoring system was the only way to achieve this and suggested sitting down with the TV companies to find out what they really wanted from badminton.
    I find this disconcerting. It suggests that the attempts to woo commercial interest are stabs in the dark, without having done the needed homework of researching the market first. At least talk to the client!

    This article at badders.com is very interesting:
    Understanding membership helps participation sports

    It talks about surveying the market and getting some hard stats on who what when where are regulars and potential players. These stats can be used to win commercial interest and sponsorships. I've seen somewhere that Badminton Australia estimates there are at least 80,000 players around the country... but where are they? why are so very few of them in clubs? how can clubs encourage more participation? Few clubs here seem to really reach out and open up to all interested ppl -- they operate more like little separate communities. The big ones that are open, are too open that people can walk in walk out with no sense of club loyalty.

    There is no feeling that we are part of a bigger national community of a really fun sport. I think BadmintonCentral has shown that a larger (international!) community binding can be created effectively via the internet. This would be a really good start.

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    as a viewer and total badminton fanatic, i wouldn't mind 3x35 for all games.

    but in reality, i tend to agree with all points raised here.

    adelina, yes, i totally agree with you, in fact, i enjoy LD as much as MD, and honestly i learn more from LD doubles than MD.

    i wasn't saying LD should have less points than MD, but i was just attempting to guess what the IBF committee intent for the new scoring system.

    as for mixed doubles. i personally will continue to play 3x15. i also prefer it to be 3x15 internationally. i still think the game of mixed is still evolving.

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    Regular Member adelina76's Avatar
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    Hehe...getting carried away..

    Sorry Kwun, don't mean to sound like I'm huffing and puffing..but I suppose I just love WD very much and it is gut wrenching to see the scoring format being changed like that. Same goes to the mix doubles..

    You know what we should do ? We should hold like a Badminton Central Championship every..say 4 years or something at a particular country and all the users of this website should come together and have a ball playing badminton against each other..Gee, i wonder if I am to play mix, who should I play with..okey, who among you guys here are quick all around the court, hardly ever lift the shuttle (VERY CRUCIAL..*shows you the scar on her eyes and cheek*) and are extremely patient with their female partners..ahem..?

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    I have not personally tried the 11x3 system. But i don't really see that as entirely a bad thing. I see it as a "different" format. Coz mostly i've played under the 15x3 and more recently 7x5. But it should be interesting, yet to try it out.

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    Default *** discrimination?

    Adelina76:
    I agree with you and many others that the new 3x11 system format is a terrible act of *** discrimination. I have to admit that more often than not, I prefer to watch female players play rather than the men. At times, the men's game can be overly aggresive and guys simply resort to smashing their way out of trouble, unlike most ladies, who will adopt a more subtle approach when put under pressure. It is usually evident that ladies think much more on court and therfore, much is to be learned in observing matches involving ladies. The sad fact is that guys think with there testicles rather than their brains too much of the time. That's not too say all guys are like this, mut too often this is unfortunately the case. So stuff the IBF! Bring back the old 3x15 system! We, the hardcore badminton nuts demand it!

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    badminton central championship! yes!

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    F-Man
    what club do you play at in Scot? I may pop along there..... :-)

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    Default *** discrimination?

    Kwun's statement on the length of the match may have more truth than people realise.

    One of the aims of the IBF is to try and bring more grass-roots players into watching badminton. Sure, I can agree the women's/mxd game is more tactically interesting. But would anybody say that the average person on the street would understand this from watching a two hour ladies doubles match?

    I very much doubt the average person would understand why a lady would play LD for two hours and then be exhausted for her mxd doubles the next day.

    In your 'average' club, the fewer points system actually leads to more rotation of games thereby enhancing the variety of games with different players - a plus point for the social aspect of the game and grass roots players.

    If badminton does NOT get any viewing time on TV it might be better to have a greater proportion of viewing time spent on MS, MD. Then for the time that is allocated to the ladies' disciplines, at least we would have a chance of seeing the whole match rather than edited highlights

    BTW, I haven't seen a two hour men's doubles match before so I wonder which match is Adelina referring to.

    And on the subject of *** discrimination, aren't the men being discriminated against by having to play longer?

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