User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    In a box.
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Wink [Help] Badminton Advice/Strategies

    Well, usually when I play badminton, my strategy is to clear, they return the shuttle than after I smash or drop shot.

    Do you guys have any other advice/strategies for me to perform?

    Right now I'm learning the basics like smash and everything but the thing is that they're not teaching us some strategies, in Lee's badminton ; Level 3-4.

    Sorry if I'm over-using the word, "Strategy".

    Thanks for all the help.

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,064
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i wouldn't call that a strategy, more like a certain tactic you use. the strategy in your situation is to control of rear court and apply enough pressure to force a return which you can attack. very loosely. if you're learning the basics, i don't think strategy should be first and foremost on your mind. good footwork, good grip and good technique is what you need to focus on.

    importantly, before you even look at strategies, you have to understand each stroke, when to use and when not to use. what happens if you play that shot? what are you trying to achieve? what situation should i use what shots? if you don't understand the shots themselves, it's very hard to develop good strategy and tactics.

    however, just as some insight, i'd call strategy a goal that you are hoping to achieve, e.g. tire your opponent out, gain the attack, apply pressure to the back court, reduce opponents ability to play net shots. tactics are shots and decisions which help you get there. kind of like strategy: get 90% in exams. tactics: study 2 hours a night, do lots of exercises.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    somewhere
    Posts
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You play defensively. Perhaps some variations in your game such as an offensive intention somewhen in the game might get your problems out.

    The idea is not to get your opponent to foresaw your stroke. At best is to make him foresaw the wrong one. I'd go tricky with half smashes, slice drops and a mixture of fakes in front if you were offensive. As a defensive player, he might expect a clear. So, perhaps a well performed slice drop might send him late to the net and force him to give you a piece to attack with.

    If he's better, he might turn it back high. Play it further back, but aggressively. This clear might be answered with a bad clear, a drop or if he does a right clear, you might jump smash it. But, be aware, smashes and jump smashes might be THE shot to do, but it takes a longer recovry, aim and judge to do it when the opponent isn't settled back into position, if he misses a shot. The other purpous is a very risky offensive move as you might shot your fastest shot from the back line to a settled player.

    Use your opponent's flaws. I'm almost sure he can't fire a good back hand overhead clear, nor can he drive a good backhand smash. Exploit it. He will finally learn that even though he might play arround the head, it takes more time, gets him off position and costs points.

    Also, consider his position and the effect of your shot by its angle, speed and target as all will give you an idea of the answeryou'll receive and the traveling time.

    The best advise I can give you is to get all your backhand strokes. Every mid level players try this side since most of them can't play it.

    I can compare this situation to tennis. If you can't get it, they'll aim at it. If you can master it, it's the best advantages you can get out of the game. I can do a one hander and it strikes harder than my forehand. My opponent play 50% time on each side, perhaps more the forehand.

    In badminton, you won't shot harder this way, but you might supprise your opponent, spare precious time, spare energy give a quicker answer. It is very important to get this side on your play. I'm getting back at badminton after a year stop. I can tell you I am starting by the strokes.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    malaysia
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Stratergy

    The most basic and usefull thing you can learn is just make suer your shuttles reach the back and where its intended to and hit your shuttle away from your opponent,then smash if you have an open court.with this you can beat anybody providing you have good strokes and footwork.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canda
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Like any other game -and i mean ANY other game - Badminton is about control. There are many different ways to achieve control, but they all revolve around taking the offensive, and forcing your opponent to defend. You mention that your favorite tactic is to to clear, and then drop or smash the return. This may work for now, but when your opponent learns to capitalize on this set-up, ou will come to regret it. Fact is, clearing is only strategically useful if you can indeed place the shuttle over and behind your opponent, forcing a weak return. If you can't do this, ie your opponent is fast enough moving backward, then you have just given your opponent a chance to take the offensive, and therefore take control of the game. The only other time to use a clear is if you are in trouble and need the time to recover your position. Remember to take the offensive when the chance is presented to you. Critics please keep in mind that this is a generalization to help a relative beginner understand the difference between defensive and offensive shots. GL to you, hope you do well.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    152
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drop2it View Post
    Like any other game -and i mean ANY other game - Badminton is about control. There are many different ways to achieve control, but they all revolve around taking the offensive, and forcing your opponent to defend. You mention that your favorite tactic is to to clear, and then drop or smash the return. This may work for now, but when your opponent learns to capitalize on this set-up, ou will come to regret it. Fact is, clearing is only strategically useful if you can indeed place the shuttle over and behind your opponent, forcing a weak return. If you can't do this, ie your opponent is fast enough moving backward, then you have just given your opponent a chance to take the offensive, and therefore take control of the game. The only other time to use a clear is if you are in trouble and need the time to recover your position. Remember to take the offensive when the chance is presented to you. Critics please keep in mind that this is a generalization to help a relative beginner understand the difference between defensive and offensive shots. GL to you, hope you do well.
    What offensive shots are there apart from smash and drop...? just curious as to what shots you consider offensive, drives?

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canda
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I consider an offensive shot to be anything that forces your opponent to lift the shuttle, that is, it forces them to hit the shuttle when it has fallen below the net. If you agree that this is true, then that means that in the right situation, any shot can be offensive.

    A shot can't be called "offensive" or "defensive" based on the above criteria - "falls below the net' - alone. You have to consider your opponent's speed, your opponent's initial position, your position, the consequences if the opponent makes any of a number of different returns, what shots your oppenent is likely to return, what shots they have difficulty with, what shots YOU are likely to return or a have difficulty with...but without considering any of the above, whatever shot A) provides the shortest shuttle flight time and B) is also the furthest out of reach of your opponent is the most offensive shot. Hence, regarding A), a blisteringly fast smash is more offensive than a drop, BUT, depending on placement, a well-executed drop might be more offensive/effective if it is far out of reach from the opponent.

    Badminton is a game of extreme stratedgy, and as a player gets better, they start to recognize patterns that their oppenents make. If they are clever, they can influence that pattern with shots that would normally seem to be defensive, but in the context of the rally/game/match, are actually very offensive.

    Hope this clears things up. I hope I haven't gone into to much detail...I never know when to stop explaining a concept and trust the readers to just understand it...

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think it is necessary to get more information about your level of play before we can give advice that is useful to you. At the beginner level, simply keeping the shuttle in play works great since beginners have a tendency to commit many unforced errors. For intermediate players, if you keep your shots to the corners there's a good chance that your opponent will eventually play a poor shot that you can smash or kill. For more advanced players, you can't rely on their playing sloppy strokes, you need to pressure them into giving you opportunities to finish the rally, while at the same time you have to keep them from using their strongest weapons on you.

Similar Threads

  1. Double Strategies
    By Birdy in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 4
    : 08-29-2010, 08:21 PM
  2. Strategies for when you don't play well....
    By Cheung in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 44
    : 03-27-2008, 12:06 AM
  3. strategies
    By tneiba in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 3
    : 04-09-2006, 12:30 AM
  4. Strategies
    By quik_silver in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 3
    : 12-26-2005, 06:22 AM
  5. Need strategies
    By shiann_88 in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 1
    : 03-03-2003, 01:46 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •