User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 18 to 22 of 22
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drop2it View Post
    The only time I use a long serve right now is if I can serve down the centreline to a backhand. This tends to force the reciever to take a backhand shot that has already moved past them - very difficult to pull off, considering that I'm standing at the net waiting for it.
    I have quite a bit of problem receiving this serve. i.e. I am right handed on the right side of the court and certain servers will serve to the back corner on my backhand side. I tried to adapt by turning my body counter clockwise so I can reach better with my backhand. They are pretty consistent with such a serve too. What would be the best way to deal with such a serve?
    Last edited by okieoutie; 01-25-2009 at 05:38 AM.

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canda
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default preparing for a long serve down the centreline

    Quote Originally Posted by okieoutie View Post
    I have quite a bit of problem receiving this serve. i.e. I am right handed on the right side of the court and certain servers will serve to the back corner on my backhand side. I tried to adapt by turning my body counter clockwise so I can reach better with my backhand. They are pretty consistent with such a serve too. What would be the best way to deal with such a serve?
    This is exactly the serving situation that I am talking about, and it has worked very well for me due to reasons expained in my earlier post. If I was forced to defend against such a serve, I would:
    a) hug the centreline so as not to present a backhand target in the first place
    b) keep my left foot forward and my right foot behind, with my racket at head level.
    c) as my coach says, "lean forward, but think back." This means that a reciever needs to be prepared to leap back very quickly in order to smash the long serve, but still be able to attack the short serve
    d) My left foot would be about 0.5 metres from the short service line.

    Hope this helps. The main thing is to anticipate the long serve, and be fast enough to jump back for the smash. If all else fails, hit an around-the-head forehand rather than a weak backhand. Good Luck.

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    406
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drop2it View Post
    Question: When you say serve long to the corners, am I to assume that you mean the outside corners? I find it difficult to believe this is effective because then the flight pattern of the shuttle would be directly above the receiver's head...
    I used to think so too. But after studying Gollum's excellent web site, I decided to give it a go. It really does work--thanks Gollum!

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    For my problem, I watch Lee jae bok's video and found a solution.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_V38c4kDP8

    Watch 1:50-2:20. He is in the left court instead of right but the idea makes sense when waiting for a serve on the right side of the court. I have used it against players that serve to the backhand far corner and I had no problem returning it now. The idea is to have your right foot forward. This way, you can easily reach shots to your backhand and forehand. I probably hold the racket a little above the head in front of me.

    Quote Originally Posted by drop2it View Post
    This is exactly the serving situation that I am talking about, and it has worked very well for me due to reasons expained in my earlier post. If I was forced to defend against such a serve, I would:
    a) hug the centreline so as not to present a backhand target in the first place
    b) keep my left foot forward and my right foot behind, with my racket at head level.
    c) as my coach says, "lean forward, but think back." This means that a reciever needs to be prepared to leap back very quickly in order to smash the long serve, but still be able to attack the short serve
    d) My left foot would be about 0.5 metres from the short service line.

    Hope this helps. The main thing is to anticipate the long serve, and be fast enough to jump back for the smash. If all else fails, hit an around-the-head forehand rather than a weak backhand. Good Luck.
    Last edited by okieoutie; 06-24-2009 at 10:46 PM.

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,948
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I used to think so too. But after studying Gollum's excellent web site, I decided to give it a go. It really does work--thanks Gollum!
    Thanks, glad it helped.

    I used to play all my flick serves down the middle, but when I moved up a grade, I found they were reliably getting smashed down my throat. Playing the flick serve wide solved that problem.

    It was also very noticeable that everyone else was using wide flick serves, and serves down the middle were rare. I can't guarantee this trend is monotonic, but it certainly seems that the pros usually place their flick serves wide.

    I now reserve a straight flick serve for exceptional circumstances, such as when the receiver's partner is blocking his route backwards along the centre line.

    Quote Originally Posted by okieoutie View Post
    For my problem, I watch Lee jae bok's video and found a solution.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_V38c4kDP8

    Watch 1:50-2:20. He is in the left court instead of right but the idea makes sense when waiting for a serve on the right side of the court. I have used it against players that serve to the backhand far corner and I had no problem returning it now. The idea is to have your right foot forward. This way, you can easily reach shots to your backhand and forehand. I probably hold the racket a little above the head in front of me.
    That's a very strange solution. While it may help you cope with this particular serve -- a drive serve down your backhand side -- it severely limits your ability to cope with the more standard serves.

    As a right-hander, receiving serve with your right foot forward is a bad idea. With this stance, the only way you can possibly cope with a good flick serve is to be standing back well behind the service line -- giving you time to turn your body.

    With your left foot forward, you can get much closer to the service line -- ideally, your left foot would be almost touching the line -- and still be able to cope with flick serves. Being closer to the service line is desirable, because it gives you a much better attack of the low serve.

    It does take quite some practice to get used to this: you need to learn the footwork to move quickly backwards to attack the flick serve. Nevertheless, having your left foot forwards is the right way to receive serve. Every professional player receives serve with his non-racket foot forwards, every single time.

    If the serve is very flat -- a drive serve -- then you need to cut it out as early as possible. You should hit it without even moving from your forwards position. This will require quick reactions and a well-controlled round-the-head forehand. The result is normally an immediate winning shot.

    If the serve is somewhere in between -- a slightly high drive, or a very flat flick -- then you will likely need to make a single jump backwards to reach it. Again, this is difficult but possible.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-25-2009 at 06:52 AM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Babolat Black lines
    By David_Allan in forum Badminton String
    Replies: 6
    : 04-05-2010, 10:23 AM
  2. Badminton Pick Up Lines
    By ElinOng0 in forum General Forum
    Replies: 44
    : 10-04-2007, 03:23 AM
  3. Service lines
    By Craig in forum General Forum
    Replies: 6
    : 09-22-2007, 04:24 PM
  4. lines in singles + doubles
    By green ham in forum General Forum
    Replies: 4
    : 01-02-2005, 01:25 PM
  5. Thomas Cup Quarterfinals Lines-up
    By eugene in forum Thomas/Uber Cups 2004
    Replies: 2
    : 05-12-2004, 05:16 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •