User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 19

Thread: Unforced Errors

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Essex, England
    Posts
    1,223
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Unforced Errors

    Hi,

    You cant avoid them, they are always there lurking in a rally, and aint they annoying? At the moment i seem to be playing so many unforced errors it is untrue, and not only does it pee me off, it is dis-heartening. Playing incredible face pace rallies until bam, finaly it goes into the net. Really getting on my nerves, yet it is something that cannot be avoided, even the top internationals play 1 or 2 unforced errors, but i am playing so many at the moment. As i said, you cannot hide from them, it's just a case of when they happen and at what point in the game.

    Matt

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    650
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    u need to practice some drills for consistency
    furthermore you need to take a look at what shots you are messing up on most and focus on those

    i hate errors

    i love badminton rallies.. i am disapointed even when my opponents make errors
    not neccessarily in tournaments, becuase then i want to win anyway i can take it

    but in a game i ususally just want to have a good battle.. and unforced errors really messup any potentially great rallies :0

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Canadian in UK
    Posts
    39
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Try regular practises with stroke and movement repetitions. Can be a bit dull, and you will need to be committed, but it does have its benefits. Now the hard part - finding someone equally willing to practise to improve.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    964
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I agree with the above comments. As well as practicing for consistency I think you also have to look at a few things when you are playing and analyse them after the game.

    1. Whether the opponent is putting you under enough pressure to force the error. If so then perhaps you need to work on your defence. I know this is technically classed as a forced error, but sometimes you need to know what the distinction is.
    2. Whether there are any particular strokes which are causing errors. If so, you may be catching the shuttle too late or the skill may need adjustment.
    3. Whether you are relaxed enough during the game to play the strokes or whether you are forcing the game. If you are tense then you are more likely to make a mistake.
    4. Shot selection. Whether you feel that every stroke must be a winner and go for risky shots. If you are trying to play very tight all the time and make the shot a winner then there are going to be errors unless you are extraordinary in consistency. Could need patience to wait for the opportunity.
    5. Fitness. If you are knackered then you are more likely to make an unforced error.
    Last edited by UkPlayer; 08-04-2002 at 11:34 AM.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Gosh do I know about that. Sometimes I feel like I throw away half a game, sometimes giving away points just with the serve return.

    I think UkPlayer hit it right on with #4. Sometimes our opponent is so good, or we perceive them as so good, that we try to be too fine. We try to make the perfect shot to put the opponent in serious trouble, or we try to rush the rally to a conclusion with a great shot. Sometimes the mind and body are working well and we can do it, but if we're a little off, we just hurt ourselves.

    Notice how basketball players or other athletes get into a rhythm where everything seems to be going right? When things are going like that for us, it's the time when we can push it to the edge. Otherwise, it's better to give ourselves a little margin for error, especially early in the game. Obviously we don't want to make the shot so safe that the opponent doesn't have to work, and that's where the practice comes in.

    By playing it a little cautious, we may have to run a little more and work a little harder, but in the meantime, we may get some confidence and things will start to click for us on the court and we can push the limits out a little. It's terrible to be super fit and lose without even getting to breathe hard.

    Speaking of confidence, don't underestimate it's significance in a close game.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    13,675
    Mentioned
    37 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Also can consider if the opponent is making you play an error but you perceive it as an unforced error.
    Example:
    you hit drop shot
    opponent replies with a low shot that lands around the T-junction.
    you approach the shuttle and try to hit the shuttle to a corner (either forecourt or rear court)
    The shuttle lands outside of the court.

    Is that an unforced error or did the opponent play the low shot (from the drop) in such a way that made you produce the error(in which case it becomes a forced error!)?

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    963
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yes there are some "unforced" errors but generally its more relevant to look at patterns of play and repeated situations when analysing a game.

    Not hitting unforced errors is a very subjective evaluation at best, start at the technical standard of the shots and movement , look at the fitness levels, then the mental attitude if all of these are good then maybe you can say ok thats an "unforced" error

    Also if you play close to your limit you will make mistakes, if you serve to skim the net you will serve in the net sometimes, perhaps on balance this risk is acceptable because you know the quality of your opponents is such that you need to skim the net to get in the rally, so there are many factors here, your confidence, your opponents, your serve technique, the match situation.

    Conversley if you high serve two feet short and your opponent hits a smash which you fail to return its not the block which is the "error"

    Often there is something which leads to the error or is the root cause of the inconsistency

  8. #8
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I hate when you make error on a shot that will look spectacular when executed but looks totally crazy when it trickles on your side of the net.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Wiltshire, England
    Posts
    296
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I agree with dlp. Badminton is a very subtle game and there are a whole range of pressure upon players throughout a match. The distiction between a forced error and an unforced error is very fine. Often it is informative to examine an individuals pattern of interpretation. When placed in the same situation - for example waiting for a smash and the opponent plays a half smash which you then hit out - different players will interpret that is different ways. Some will blame themselves while others will not.

    In the main though it is you who knows best whether you made an error. Often this does not have to mean you lost the point. Many is the the time when I have aimed the shuttle comfortably in court only to hit a fantastic shot which clips the net and then the line with only a millimetre to spare.

    People who have trouble with errors should realise that the higher the level at which you play the game the less chance you have of winning points with outright winners. Far more points are won by errors. The trick is to find the balance in forcing the error from your opponent and not making the error yourself. The only way to do this is training hard and playing to your strengths.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    554
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I consider an unforced error to occur when your opponent has not put you under any unusual pressure with the shot. You are in position OK and there is no legimate reason to make the mistake. For example, you are set up for a smash and you want to hit it to the side but it goes wide, or you are set up for an overhead drop and it goes into the net, or an attacking clear that goes long, or a low serve return that goes into the net. It can occur on defensive shots too, as when your opponent hits an overhead drop and you get there OK but your redrop doesn't clear the net or your clear goes out.

    Of course, it all depends on the relative skill levels of the players involved as to what should be expected to be a routine return.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    India
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Originally posted by Californian
    Gosh do I know about that. Sometimes I feel like I throw away half a game, sometimes giving away points just with the serve return.

    I think UkPlayer hit it right on with #4. Sometimes our opponent is so good, or we perceive them as so good, that we try to be too fine. We try to make the perfect shot to put the opponent in serious trouble, or we try to rush the rally to a conclusion with a great shot. Sometimes the mind and body are working well and we can do it, but if we're a little off, we just hurt ourselves.

    Notice how basketball players or other athletes get into a rhythm where everything seems to be going right? When things are going like that for us, it's the time when we can push it to the edge. Otherwise, it's better to give ourselves a little margin for error, especially early in the game. Obviously we don't want to make the shot so safe that the opponent doesn't have to work, and that's where the practice comes in.

    By playing it a little cautious, we may have to run a little more and work a little harder, but in the meantime, we may get some confidence and things will start to click for us on the court and we can push the limits out a little. It's terrible to be super fit and lose without even getting to breathe hard.

    Speaking of confidence, don't underestimate it's significance in a close game.
    cali,u just spoke my mind!!!!
    i was in a tournament recently & came up against a national player in the 2nd round.
    i was constantly thinking that he was a national player & that i wd have to produce some excellent shots........yah thats how i screwed up

    in the match i served long around 8 times,dropped wide & smashed many times into the net just because i wanted to get that "perfect angle" so that every shot was a winner
    i practically handed him the match

    i tried kicking my ass later but just couldn't get my foot to reach my butt with the reqd force

    shabs
    Last edited by shabs; 08-09-2002 at 05:06 AM.

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Most of my unforced errors come from (attempted) drop shots from the baseline. They are almost always short so that the bird just clips the net, but sometimes they are high enough for a quick smash from the opponent. I've found that it's best to give a tap rather than a swing, aiming for a place 1.5 times the net height. Also, work on placement in the corners rather than dead on centre.

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bedford, UK
    Posts
    191
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think the phrases "playing yourself in" or "getting your eye in" are often relevant in these situations. Sometimes going for the killer shot just demands too fine a margin of error. If you are missing a good few then you need to back off slightly, increase the margin of perfection you are aiming for, and just ensure you deliver a good shot. A few of these are likely to "get your eye in", also critically raising your confidence, and allowing you to then hone those shots back to the really fine margins that will help you beat the better players.

    When times are tough you might have to back off slightly, it's the better of two evils. It might not be nice to play a marginally less tight shots against a good player, but as long as your shot goes over it is one more shot they have to return. Unforced errors feel so bad because you have just given the point away for free.

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    boston, ma, US
    Posts
    808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    two days ago, during the first game of the day, both my opponents and I lost virtually all the points on unforced errors. It was one of those cold New England days and I guess we weren't properly warmed up yet either. nothing you can do about unforced errors except keep on practicing. i notice whenever I take a slightly longer than usual leave from the sport, I always come back with a lot of unforced in the first few games. just a sign of rust i guess.

  15. #15
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,051
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I suppose it is not possible to be error-free, especially when you are not in form for whatever reasons. We have witnessed silly errors made by even the best of world-class players from time to time during international competitions.

    But it is true to say that a better player is one who makes less errors, especially unforced errors.

    So that will be the day when we emerge as winners primarily owing to the unforced errors committed by our opponent. For we have become more consistent with our shots through long sessions of trainining in shot-making.

    Practice and competitions will bring us there. What other choice? For we love baddie.

  16. #16
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    13,675
    Mentioned
    37 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Last night I played a good player with consistent high quality shots. But sometimes my replies would go out - is that a forced error? or unforced error?

    I can reach his shots

  17. #17
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Vermont, USA
    Posts
    630
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    from what you say Cheung it still seems like you're put under pressure just by the quality and accuracy of his shots. I guess it's up to you to guage whether or not it was a forced error, based whether or not your reply should have been better. normally any shot i miss i usually feel i should have been able to make... but i suppose at certain times you're just hoping!
    gregory

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. do you know the Law for service court errors?
    By kwun in forum Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating
    Replies: 18
    : 10-16-2012, 11:59 AM
  2. Too many errors kill me
    By chubawamba in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 8
    : 02-07-2009, 03:04 AM
  3. LD vs. LCW (unforced errors)
    By ye333 in forum German Open / All England / Swiss Open 2008
    Replies: 60
    : 04-09-2008, 05:46 PM
  4. HELP! Losing points by errors!
    By WalzY in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 11
    : 01-17-2008, 05:42 PM
  5. Reducing Errors
    By bighook in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 9
    : 01-23-2005, 01:35 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •