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  1. #171
    Regular Member gunner93's Avatar
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    That's Capital, Visor. Thanks!

    Reminds me of Mr Anderson aka Neo in Matrix dodging bullets from the Agents. LOL!

  2. #172
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Ok, but you should try throwing balls at your boy first before using bullets.

  3. #173
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    coaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZonhttp://www.sportspsychologycoaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZone.htmle.htmlhttp://www.aaronosman.com/the-mid-achieving-peak-
    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    This brings up an interesting topic, although it may be difficult for a teenager to attempt, but it will surely improve with time andpractice and can be used in daily life. I’m still attempting it when I play badminton or piano.

    It is “wushin”.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushin

    The concept in martial arts literally meaning being in astate of no-mindedness. One good example of this is Bruce Lee. Watch how he moves: there’s no thinking, only instinctive reaction. In sports, this is also known as being “in the zone”. A state of mind where one is free of judgment and fear, and doesn’t require thinking or concentration of techniques or strategies. The mind can perceive effortlessly the whole playing field, the opponents’ positions, the ball/puck and the body can react and perform without hesitation as if the athlete is one with the flow of the sport. In psychology this is known as being “in the flow”, a state of total immersion, total concentration.


    When one is in this state of mind, there is no fear, no regrets of mistakes. There is no pain or suffering. There is only performance purely based on instinctive reaction and muscle memory.
    ..
    Continuing further with wushin/mushin

    http://www.aaronosman.com/the-mind-o...k-performance/
    Last edited by visor; 05-03-2013 at 11:11 AM.

  4. #174
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.thesportjournal.org/article/entering-zone-guide-coaches

    And being in the zone. Interesting bit about "error parking".

    Perhaps that's whysome players after a mistake, even though they don't have any noticeable sweat, they walk to the side of the court to wipe and fling off sweat from their face.
    Last edited by visor; 05-03-2013 at 11:22 AM.

  5. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    coaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZonhttp://www.sportspsychologycoaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZone.htmle.htmlhttp://www.aaronosman.com/the-mid-achieving-peak-
    Continuing further with wushin/mushin

    http://www.aaronosman.com/the-mind-o...k-performance/
    The Mind of no Mind...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9U5bxmWc2oM


  6. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    This brings up an interesting topic, although it may be difficult for a teenager to attempt, but it will surely improve with time andpractice and can be used in daily life. I’m still attempting it when I play badminton or piano.

    It is “wushin”.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushin

    The concept in martial arts literally meaning being in astate of no-mindedness. One good example of this is Bruce Lee. Watch how he moves: there’s no thinking, only instinctive reaction. In sports, this is also known as being “in the zone”. A state of mind where one is free of judgment and fear, and doesn’t require thinking or concentration of techniques or strategies. The mind can perceive effortlessly the whole playing field, the opponents’ positions, the ball/puck and the body can react and perform without hesitation as if the athlete is one with the flow of the sport. In psychology this is known as being “in the flow”, a state of total immersion, total concentration.


    When one is in this state of mind, there is no fear, no regrets of mistakes. There is no pain or suffering. There is only performance purely based on instinctive reaction and muscle memory.



    ..
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muga-mushin

    Muga-mushin (無我無心?) is a compound term of muga and mushin. Muga literally means no-self[2] (derived from the Sanskrit anātman) and Mushin no-mind[3] (also from the Sanskrit a-citta). What is negated is the empirical body-mind as an ontological independent state of existence. Muga and mushin point to the same thing, the state of egolessness, but from different perspectives. Muga refers to the negation of the physical state, mushin to the mental state of empirical existence.

    To understand better mushin one needs to understand acitta, or simply its Sanskrit-root citta. Citta is not easily rendered into English. As is the case with so many other Sanskrit terms, there does not seem to be a precise equivalent for it in English. Previous translations have proposed a variety of renderings, such as 'mind-stuff', 'thinking-principle', and similar compound words. In many instances, citta seems to convey consciousness, mind, intellect or psychic mass that orders and illuminates sensations coming from without—can serve as a mirror for objects, without the senses interposing between it and its object. Thus the non-initiate is incapable of gaining freedom, because his mind, instead of being stable (still, non-fluctuating) is constantly violated by the activity of the senses, by the subconscious, and by the 'thrust for life'.

    Reductionistic steps in the evolution of muga-mushin concept and application


  7. #177
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.sportspsychologycoaching....ndTheZone.html

    @gunner93
    An interesting article on mental toughness, which may be useful for your son.

  8. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    http://www.sportspsychologycoaching....ndTheZone.html

    @gunner93
    An interesting article on mental toughness, which may be useful for your son.
    The bottom line is this: Enjoy.

  9. #179
    Regular Member gunner93's Avatar
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    Always new stuff to learn. Many thanks.

    After some worthy sparring sessions, I ask the boys to recall what was the best shot they did during their match. Then I asked how they felt when they executed that shot. Then I let them re-visualize and savor that sensation while its still fresh in their minds. I dont know if there is any term in psychology or if its related to wushin or mushin, but I want to simply leave a positive imprint at the end of their training so as they approach the next with the same euphoric feeling and confidence.
    Last edited by gunner93; 05-06-2013 at 08:36 PM.

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