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  1. #171
    Regular Member gunner93's Avatar
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    That's Capital, Visor. Thanks!

    Reminds me of Mr Anderson aka Neo in Matrix dodging bullets from the Agents. LOL!

  2. #172
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Ok, but you should try throwing balls at your boy first before using bullets.

  3. #173
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    coaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZonhttp://www.sportspsychologycoaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZone.htmle.htmlhttp://www.aaronosman.com/the-mid-achieving-peak-
    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    This brings up an interesting topic, although it may be difficult for a teenager to attempt, but it will surely improve with time andpractice and can be used in daily life. I’m still attempting it when I play badminton or piano.

    It is “wushin”.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushin

    The concept in martial arts literally meaning being in astate of no-mindedness. One good example of this is Bruce Lee. Watch how he moves: there’s no thinking, only instinctive reaction. In sports, this is also known as being “in the zone”. A state of mind where one is free of judgment and fear, and doesn’t require thinking or concentration of techniques or strategies. The mind can perceive effortlessly the whole playing field, the opponents’ positions, the ball/puck and the body can react and perform without hesitation as if the athlete is one with the flow of the sport. In psychology this is known as being “in the flow”, a state of total immersion, total concentration.


    When one is in this state of mind, there is no fear, no regrets of mistakes. There is no pain or suffering. There is only performance purely based on instinctive reaction and muscle memory.
    ..
    Continuing further with wushin/mushin

    http://www.aaronosman.com/the-mind-o...k-performance/
    Last edited by visor; 05-03-2013 at 12:11 PM.

  4. #174
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.thesportjournal.org/article/entering-zone-guide-coaches

    And being in the zone. Interesting bit about "error parking".

    Perhaps that's whysome players after a mistake, even though they don't have any noticeable sweat, they walk to the side of the court to wipe and fling off sweat from their face.
    Last edited by visor; 05-03-2013 at 12:22 PM.

  5. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    coaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZonhttp://www.sportspsychologycoaching.com/articles/MentalToughnessAndTheZone.htmle.htmlhttp://www.aaronosman.com/the-mid-achieving-peak-
    Continuing further with wushin/mushin

    http://www.aaronosman.com/the-mind-o...k-performance/
    The Mind of no Mind...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9U5bxmWc2oM


  6. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    This brings up an interesting topic, although it may be difficult for a teenager to attempt, but it will surely improve with time andpractice and can be used in daily life. I’m still attempting it when I play badminton or piano.

    It is “wushin”.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushin

    The concept in martial arts literally meaning being in astate of no-mindedness. One good example of this is Bruce Lee. Watch how he moves: there’s no thinking, only instinctive reaction. In sports, this is also known as being “in the zone”. A state of mind where one is free of judgment and fear, and doesn’t require thinking or concentration of techniques or strategies. The mind can perceive effortlessly the whole playing field, the opponents’ positions, the ball/puck and the body can react and perform without hesitation as if the athlete is one with the flow of the sport. In psychology this is known as being “in the flow”, a state of total immersion, total concentration.


    When one is in this state of mind, there is no fear, no regrets of mistakes. There is no pain or suffering. There is only performance purely based on instinctive reaction and muscle memory.



    ..
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muga-mushin

    Muga-mushin (無我無心?) is a compound term of muga and mushin. Muga literally means no-self[2] (derived from the Sanskrit anātman) and Mushin no-mind[3] (also from the Sanskrit a-citta). What is negated is the empirical body-mind as an ontological independent state of existence. Muga and mushin point to the same thing, the state of egolessness, but from different perspectives. Muga refers to the negation of the physical state, mushin to the mental state of empirical existence.

    To understand better mushin one needs to understand acitta, or simply its Sanskrit-root citta. Citta is not easily rendered into English. As is the case with so many other Sanskrit terms, there does not seem to be a precise equivalent for it in English. Previous translations have proposed a variety of renderings, such as 'mind-stuff', 'thinking-principle', and similar compound words. In many instances, citta seems to convey consciousness, mind, intellect or psychic mass that orders and illuminates sensations coming from without—can serve as a mirror for objects, without the senses interposing between it and its object. Thus the non-initiate is incapable of gaining freedom, because his mind, instead of being stable (still, non-fluctuating) is constantly violated by the activity of the senses, by the subconscious, and by the 'thrust for life'.

    Reductionistic steps in the evolution of muga-mushin concept and application


  7. #177
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.sportspsychologycoaching....ndTheZone.html

    @gunner93
    An interesting article on mental toughness, which may be useful for your son.

  8. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    http://www.sportspsychologycoaching....ndTheZone.html

    @gunner93
    An interesting article on mental toughness, which may be useful for your son.
    The bottom line is this: Enjoy.

  9. #179
    Regular Member gunner93's Avatar
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    Always new stuff to learn. Many thanks.

    After some worthy sparring sessions, I ask the boys to recall what was the best shot they did during their match. Then I asked how they felt when they executed that shot. Then I let them re-visualize and savor that sensation while its still fresh in their minds. I dont know if there is any term in psychology or if its related to wushin or mushin, but I want to simply leave a positive imprint at the end of their training so as they approach the next with the same euphoric feeling and confidence.
    Last edited by gunner93; 05-06-2013 at 09:36 PM.

  10. #180
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    just think the need to bump this thread, as there are so much link and advises usefull for mental and psychology of badminton and sports in general

  11. #181
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    here are some links and sites I find usefull, I will also copy paste some gold ones

    https://www.competitivedge.com
    http://www.badmintonsecrets.com
    http://www.sportspsychologycoaching.com

  12. #182
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    https://www.competitivedge.com/getting-mentally-tough

    1. Is your head preventing you from becoming a winner?
    2. Do you suffer from slumps, choking, psych-outs, runaway emotions, negativity or a lack of confidence?
    3. Do you perform better in practice than at “crunch time” when it counts the most?
    4. Do you consistently underachieve in your performance arena?

    the individual performer or team that falls apart most often does so because of mental factors like runaway nervousness, intimidation, poor concentration, negativity, lack of confidence or an inability to let go of mistakes or bad breaks.

    To realize your full potential you have to start training your mind as well as your body! you must learn to develop these sports psychology mental skills :

    1. Staying relaxed under pressure, in what I call “good nervous.”
    2. Focusing on what’s important and letting go of everything else.
    3. Rebounding from mistakes, bad breaks and failures.
    4. Handling last minute self-doubts and negative thinking.
    5. Using mental rehearsal for upcoming performances.
    6. Motivating yourself by setting personally meaningful and compelling goals.
    7. Recognizing mental traps and avoiding them.
    8. Developing self-confidence and a positive, go-for-it attitude.

  13. #183
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    https://www.competitivedge.com/rebounding-injuries-0

    (with some cutting)

    If you’re a serious athlete and have ever had an experience with an injury, then you KNOW that the physical hurt you feel is only one VERY small part of the overall pain that you have to go through in the rehab process. The psychological pain caused by your injury and the temporary or permanent loss of your sport can be far more devastating than the strained or torn ligaments, pulled muscles, ripped cartilage or broken bones.

    you become overwhelmed by a variety of internal and external losses. As the athlete struggles with the impact of these losses, all hell breaks loose! If the injury is significant enough to keep you out of commission for a good chunk of time, the first thing that you lose is your identity as an athlete and team member. You lose your place and role on the team. "Identity confusion" sets in. Translated into understandable English, this means that you start to question who you are if you're not constantly in the pool, out on the field, course or court practicing and competing in your sport.

    ATHLETE STRATEGIES FOR COPING WITH INJURIES:

    #1 BE SAD - Allow yourself to mourn and feel whatever loss you are experiencing. Being "macho", "strong" or "brave" by burying or hiding your feelings in this situation is not only a WASTE OF ENERGY, but will interfere with you effectively coping and recovering.

    #2 DEAL WITH WHAT IS - Injured athletes have a tendency to focus on the "could 'a beens", "should 'a beens" and the "way it was" IF ONLY they hadn't gotten hurt. The fact of the matter is no amount of wishing upon a star will change the reality of your situation.

    #3 SET NEW, MORE REALISTIC GOALS FOR YOURSELF - As you begin the recovery process, you may very well have to learn to measure your successes very differently than ever before, perhaps in millimeters now instead of meters the way it was before your injury. Keep focused on your NEW goals and leave the old ones in the PAST for now where they belong.

    #4 MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE, NO MATTER WHAT – As difficult as this will be, try to stay as positive as possible. Understand that “IF IT IS TO BE, IT IS UP TO ME.” In other words, your attitude and outlook is ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING! It's all up to you. Avoid being negative because nothing good ever comes from negativity. Negativity will only bring you and everyone else around you down.

    #5 TAKE AN ACTIVE PART IN YOUR HEALING – Be conscientious about your physical therapy. Follow the doctor's advice closely. Don’t cut corners. Work as hard with your rehab as you did in your training. In addition, practice using healing imagery on a daily basis. this will make you feel less helpless, more in control and much more positive. These attitudinal changes in themselves will speed up your healing.

    #6 CONTINUE TO "PRACTICE" AND "WORK OUT". If your injury allows you to still continue any part of your training, do so! If not, "practice" mentally. Take this time to also mentally work on your weaknesses. You might even want to show up for some of the regular practices and mentally rehearse what the team is doing while they’re working out.

    #7 SEEK OUT THE SUPPORT OF YOUR TEAMMATES - FIGHT the urge to isolate yourself. You may feel worthless and suddenly different. The worst thing for you to do when you’re in a vulnerable state is to separate yourself from your group. Make a serious effort to reach out rather than pull in!

    #8 THINK ABOUT HOW TO USE YOUR SPORTS LEARNING AND EXPERIENCE IN OTHER AREAS OF YOUR LIFE - If your injury forces you into permanent retirement, you may feel that you have little to no skills or expertise that you can transfer from your sport to other endeavors. NOTHING COULD BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH! Don’t think for a minute that much of what you’ve learned and mastered is irrelevant to the “real world.”

    #9 IF NECESSARY, SEEK OUT A COUNSELOR- If you are really depressed for an extended period of time, have lost interest in things that use to excite you, have noticed that your sleep and eating patterns have changed and/or you are having suicidal thoughts, seek professional help! Don’t fool around here. Seeking out the help of a professional therapist or counselor is NOT a sign of weakness. On the contrary, it’s a sign of strength.

    #10 BE PATIENT– If your injury is temporary, allow yourself enough time to heal properly. If you're over anxious to get back to the court, field, course or pool and rush the healing process, then you may set yourself up for another, more serious injury which may cost you even more time. you may end up developing a chronic injury that could keep you out for extra weeks and even months. GO SLOWER, ARRIVE SOONER!

    COACHING STRATEGIES FOR HELPING THE INJURED ATHLETE COPE:

    #1 BE EMPATHIC- Let your athletes know that YOU understand what THEY are feeling and having to go through. Understand where their anger, frustration and disappointment comes from and allow them time to mourn. Do NOT expect them to just "suck it up", "shake it off and "be strong!" Instead, let them have their feelings without indulging them in self-pity.

    #2 WORK WITH THEIR SELF-ESTEEM - Understand that the injured athlete has just suffered a major blow to his feelings of self-worth and is therefore feeling quite vulnerable. Let him know in BOTH your actions and words that you still value him as a person, NOT just as an athlete. Do NOT avoid or act disinterested in that individual. Remember, it is YOUR responsibility to reach out to him, not vice versa.

    #3 GIVE THEM A ROLE ON THE TEAM- Help the injured athlete fight the their feelings of worthlessness and identity confusion by giving them another role on the team. Assign them a job as "assistant coach" or consultant into team functioning. Seek out their opinion and “advice” during practices or competitions.

    #4 DON’T ALLOW THE ATHLETE TO ISOLATE HIMSELF FROM THE TEAM - Insist that the athlete continue to function as an important member/part of the team. Assign other athletes on the squad to monitor the injured athlete's involvement and to intervene whenever that athlete begins to withdraw and/or isolate him/herself.

    #5 LET YOUR ATHLETE KNOW THAT YOU CARE – Increase contact and communication with the injured athletel. A little of your time at this point in the recovery process will dramatically help ease the emotional and psychological pain that the athlete is experiencing.

    #6 WHEN APPROPRIATE, EXPECT THE ATHLETE TO "PRACTICE" - Whether it’s limited physical or purely mental, let the injured athlete know that you expect her to continue her training, however modified. When possible, assign her a special workout that fits the limitation of her injury. Take an interest in her “training” and regularly check on how it’s going.

    #7 HELP THE ATHLETE GET IN TOUCH WITH OTHER AREAS OF PERSONAL STRENGTH - Help the injured athlete understand that excelling in her sport demands a tremendous amount of success and life skills that she has already developed and that she can learn to transfer to other areas in her life. Clearly spell out for her what these areas are and help her begin to see their application in other arenas.

    #8 IF THE ATHLETE'S DEPRESSION DOES NOT LIFT OR IF THERE ARE WARNING SIGNS IMMEDIATELY REFER HIM/HER TO A PROFESSIONAL- If the athlete is seriously depressed (has lost interest in activities, shows changes in eating and sleeping habits, or is having suicidal thoughts or feelings), it is critically important that you refer him/her for professional counseling. The eating/sleeping warning signs of depression must be taken very seriously.

  14. #184
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    https://www.competitivedge.com/resou...nning-coaching

    (with some cutting)

    Peak Performance Under Stress: 11 Guidelines for Winning Coaching

    INTRODUCTION
    Stress is a direct result of an athlete or team focusing on, and trying to control the "uncontrolables" within their sport (i.e., officiating, play of opponents, playing conditions, crowd, etc.). When an athlete focuses on these uncontrollables he/she is more likely to tighten up and "choke."

    STEP ONE

    COACH THE PROCESS, NOT THE OUTCOME
    When an athlete focuses on the importance of the game, winning and losing, or anything to do with the outcome of the performance, he/she is in big trouble. This focus distracts the athlete from a performance focus, tightens them up physically and insures that play will be tight and tentative. Get your athletes to focus on specifically what they have to DO to win, not on WINNING


    STEP TWO

    TEACH AN AWARENESS OF THE STRESS/PERFORMANCE CURVE
    If an athlete can "read" their nervousness preperformance and can tell the difference between "good", "bad", and "not enough" nervous, then they will be in a better position to be able to do something about their arousal level before it's too late.

    STEP THREE

    TEACH COPING SKILLS, DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME YELLING AT YOUR ATHLETES TO "RELAX"
    Spend a small amount of time preseason providing your athletes with a number of mental skills that they can use to help them to better relax under pressure. you'll do far more good than not by investing a small amount of practice time offering 2-3 relaxation techniques (progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, breathing exercises, etc.) to everyone. Armed with ways of cooling down, your athletes will be less likely to fall apart under stress.

    STEP FOUR

    TEACH REFRAMING IN PRACTICE
    Reframe adversity teaches your athletes how to use whatever adversity comes their way to boost confidence rather than erode it. Help your players see that poor weather conditions, bad call by the officials, unsportsmanlike play, fatigue, etc., can work for them. There is always an advantage in a disadvantage. Train your players to find it.

    STEP FIVE

    USE HUMOR
    The surest way to get your athletes to tighten up and play poorly is by being too serious. Peak performance comes out of having fun. You play your very best when you are enjoying the competition; regardless of the level. By using humor as a coach, you can help your at-athletes stay loose, keep the game in perspective and perform like champions.

    STEP SIX

    PROVIDE A PERSPECTIVE
    If you make the competition "bigger than life" your athletes' performances will suffer. If the game is built up too much, or if that "must win" situation becomes too important, then chances are you will not get a good game from your team. Helping in helping them handle a highly pressured situation. An athlete that chokes usually has lost his/her perspective and made the competition much too important.

    STEP SEVEN

    USE SIMULATION DAILY
    Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. Integrate competitive elements into your practices to help your athletes better adjust to the actual pressure of game day. The more your practices resemble competitions, the less chance your athletes will have of falling apart under pressure. If your athletes have trouble with bad calls, certain playing conditions, being down early, etc., simulate these elements as closely as possible in your practices.

    STEP EIGHT

    CREATE A GO-FOR-IT ATMOSPHERE
    In practice create an atmosphere of "nothing to lose" or "free to fail". When athletes are not concerned about making mistakes they perform their best. If your players are worrying about messing up they will be distracted enough and tight enough to indeed mess up. Encourage your players to let their mistakes go immediately and to focus on what they want to have happen, not what they are afraid will happen. Reward mistakes when an athlete has truly gone for it, when they have given a winning effort.

    STEP NINE

    SEPARATE SELF-WORTH FROM PERFORMANCE
    At every level of play, athletes get stressed out when they attach their self worth to the quality of their performance (i.e., "I played well so therefore I am a winner", "I was awful and therefore I am a not a good person"). You set the tone for this in how you coach and interact to your athletes. Do not make the mistake of equating their performance with how you feel about them. If you do not make this separation, then they will not be able to understand and their performance will suffer.

    STEP TEN

    CHALLENGE YOUR ATHLETES, DON'T THREATEN THEM
    When an athlete or team is threatened with consequences should they not perform well, they will consistently fall apart when the game is on the line. Threats only serve to distract the athlete from the task at hand and get them to worry about the consequences for failure. Focusing on the "what if's" of losing is the last thing you want your athletes to do before and during an important game. Instead, challenge them. Give them the message, which is implicit in any challenge that you think that they can do it, that you believe in them. Athletes will most frequently rise to your challenges and respond poorly or inconsistently to your threats.

    STEP ELEVEN

    FOCUS YOUR PLAYERS FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE UNDER PRESSURE
    Most stress related performance problems are a direct result of faulty concentration. The athlete that gets easily psyched out or intimidated does so because he or she is focusing on the wrong things (i.e., the actual or imagined prowess of the other player or team). Help your athletes concentrate on specifically what they have to do to play well. Teach them to "control their eyes and ears", to only look at, or listen to things that keep them composed and performing their best.

  15. #185
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    https://www.competitivedge.com/paren...ot-against-you

    Getting Parents to Work With You, Not Against You

    INTRODUCTION
    Believe it or not, 99% of all parents out there are sane and workable. If you want to be a successful coach you have to deliberately make an effort to train them. The following is a list of strategies and ideas that will help you in this endeavor.

    ONE
    Most parents who push, do so because they don't know how to be helpful and do not understand the effects that this has on you and their child.

    TWO
    You are in a position to give parents the 2 things that they want the most and frequently causes them to say and do unhelpful things. They want their child to feel happy and to be successful.

    THREE
    Help parents redefine what it means to be a winner. Winning is not about coming in 1st. It's about pushing your own limits and constantly striving to do better than your best. You're a winner if you drop time off a previous best, play your best, or improve a weakness.The actual outcome is much less important.

    FOUR
    Help parents redefine competition. It is not about beating someone else. Help parents understand that a focus on the competition usually results in subpar performances and performance problems. The competition is your partner and your real obstacle lies within. Train them to encourage their children to compete against themselves.

    FIVE
    Help refocus parents. All too often parents get their children to be concerned with the uncontrollables (UC's) in a competition, i.e. the crowd, the weather conditions, how important the contest is and how good your opponents are. Teach parents that a focus on the UC's will only get the child into performance trouble. Instead the athlete should be encouraged to focus on what they can control (i.e., themselves and their reaction to all the UC's).

    SIX
    Don't use a crisis intervention model with parents. Don't wait for problems and emotions to arise before you are forced to deal with them. Use a preventive, teaching model and commit yourself to training parents from day 1 in your program. Actively educate them with verbal and written material.

    SEVEN
    In writing, state clearly your coaching philosophy, coaching style, club policies and view about competition. Don't leave any of this material to their imagination. They have a right to know and you have a responsibility to clarify these for them.

    EIGHT
    Clearly define the roles of the athlete, coach and parent so they knows what is expected of them and how they can best help the team. For parents specifically state that coaching is something you do and they don't. Define what it means to coach so that they won't have any confusion about the matter.

    NINE
    Define appropriate meet/practice behavior, the do's and don'ts for both athletes and parents and explain why this is so. Spell out clearly the consequences for violating appropriate behavior so when you intervene it doesn't come as a surprise.

    TEN
    Establish yourself as an expert. You know the sport, (even if you're inexperienced) and it's your job to see that things are run the way you see fit. Although parents may challenge you on this, act as if you are the expert in a non-defensive way. If you feel unsure of yourself consult regularly with other more experienced coaches.

    ELEVEN
    Define a common mission for the team and organization. Let parents know where you want to go and how they can help you and their children reach these goals.

    TWELVE
    Communicate. Keep lines of communication open between you and the parents. Be approachable. Encourage them to bring their problems to you directly. Listen to them and give them the feeling that you hear them and can understand where they are coming from, even if you don't agree with them.

    THIRTEEN
    Keep professional whenever possible. Do not use your emotions to respond to problem parents. If they push your buttons, keep your emotions out of your interactions with them. If you lose your professional perspective, you can't be effective.

    FOURTEEN
    Help parents understand the developmental perspective you have in training. Most parents don't understand why their child may not be performing at a certain level and winning everything in sight. Explain to them about the long term process you are involved in with their child and the proper way to measure success with it.

    FIFTEEN
    Teach parents the principles of peak performance which they can then use as a guideline for what to say and do with their child-athlete.

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    https://www.competitivedge.com/paren...otivation-game

    With some cutting


    A Coach's Guide to Winning at the Motivation Game

    INTRODUCTION

    Winners have it, everyone else wants it. Motivation, that critical ingredient to success both in and out of sports. It's the one element that will allow you to get back up after repeated failures and still achieve your goals. Follow these guidelines/strategies to help develop winning motivation on your team.

    STEP ONE

    MOTIVATION IS ABOUT SHARED RESPONSIBILITY
    It is not just up to you to motivate your athletes. They must have some spark of motivation themselves. You can't motivate someone to do something unless they want to also!

    STEP TWO

    MOTIVATION IS ABOUT HAVING A DIRECTION/GIVING A DIRECTION
    Everyone is motivated. The key question is to do what? As a coach you have to help your athletes develop that direction. S

    STEP THREE

    MOTIVATION IS ABOUT SELLING
    Good motivators are good sales people. You have to sell your athletes on hard work and the pursuit of excellence. You have to get them to buy that their sacrifices and sweat are worth the price of the goal. This means that you have to explain to them the necessity of their efforts. Simply telling an athlete to do something is nowhere near as effective as explaining to them how this exercise or drill will help them get closer to where they want to go.

    STEP FOUR

    DO NOT TAKE MOTIVATION FOR GRANTED
    Even professional athletes need outside motivation from their coach. Too many coaches wrongly assume that the athlete should already be totally motivated and that this motivation piece is up to the athlete. Big Mistake!

    STEP FIVE

    MOTIVATION IS AN EVERYDAY JOB, NOT JUST SOMETHING YOU DO BEFORE THE BIG COMPETITIONS
    90% of motivation happens in practice from day #1. 5-10% of motivation gets done just before the big game/race/match. .

    STEP SIX

    THE HEART OF MOTIVATION IS DEVELOPING A SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR ATHLETE

    RELATIONSHIP/MOTIVATION BUILDING GUIDELINES TREAT YOUR ATHLETES WITH RESPECT
    Respect them and they will respect you, be able to learn from you and will go to the ends of the earth to perform for you.

    AVOID COMPARISONS
    Comparisons almost always make athletes feel badly about themselves, kill their motivation and engender intrasquad rivalry & unhealthy competition. Compare only to model (i.e., "Look at the way Janice executes that trick... especially watch what she does with her upper body").

    DEAL WITH YOUR ATHLETE AS A WHOLE PERSON
    If you care about them as a person rather than just what they can do for the team, they will reward you with high motivation, increased intensity and great performances.

    LISTEN/BE EMPATHETIC
    The heart of effective communication is listening. Be silent when they talk, don't plan your next comment and try to step into their shoes.

    DO NOT EQUATE YOUR ATHLETES' SELF-WORTH WITH THEIR PERFORMANCES
    Bad performances don't mean bad people. let your athlete know that you are even more there for them when they have a bad performance than when they have a good one.

    STEP SEVEN

    MOTIVATE BY CHALLENGES RATHER THAN THREATS
    A challenge is positive and motivational. A threat is negative and gets the athlete preoccupied with the consequences for failing, punishment.

    STEP EIGHT

    BE POSITIVE
    Nothing good comes from negativity. It's a real demotivator. Consistently getting down on your athletes will not make them feel good about themselves or you.

    STEP NINE

    USE RECOGNITION
    Recognition is one of the most powerful motivators there is. Every day let your athletes know that you know they're there and giving an effort. Even simple comments like, "good job", or "nice hustle" will go a long way to motivating them.

    STEP TEN

    HANDLE FAILURES AND MISTAKES CONSTRUCTIVELY
    Teach your athletes that failures and setbacks are a necessary part of the learning process and not a cause for embarrassment or quitting. If you jump in an athlete's face whenever he messes up you'll demotivate him and get him worrying about failing.

    STEP ELEVEN

    MODEL MOTIVATION IN ALL OF YOU INTERACTIONS
    If you want to be a motivator you have to be motivated! If you can't get excited about practice and always seem to just "go through the motions" forget about motivation. Motivation starts with you.

    STEP TWELVE

    HAVE A BIG ENOUGH "WHY"
    Motivation is all about having a big enough "why" or reason for doing something. If you have a big enough why, you can always find the "how" to accomplish it.

    STEP THIRTEEN

    USE GOAL SETTING THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THE SEASON
    Clearly defined goals help you take your dreams and turn them into reality.

    STEP FOURTEEN

    HAVE FUN
    Create an atmosphere of fun on your team and you will motivate your athletes to train harder and longer. introduce humor and fun regularly in practice.

    STEP FIFTEEN REST Rest is part of good training. Short breaks in training over the course of the season will keep your athletes physically and mentally fresh and insure that they stay.

  17. #187
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    Default

    https://www.competitivedge.com/paren...g-coachs-guide

    (with some cutting)


    Slumpbusting - A Coach's Guide for Baseball/Softball and important for all sports!

    STEP ONE

    RULE OUT THE PHYSICAL
    Before you assume that a slump is mental, you have to rule out the physical or technical factors that might be causing it. If I'm not hitting, is there something wrong with my stance, grip or swing mechanics. If I consistently commit errors is there something skill-wise wrong with my fielding technique.

    STEP TWO

    IS THE SLUMP RELATED TO SOMETHING GOING ON OFF THE FIELD? Sometimes ball players get into a slump because they are preoccupied or distracted by family or personal problems/pressures. Also, as a coach, you might want to take a look at your own behavior in relation to the athlete. Sometimes slumps are directly related to how the coach deals with the ball player.

    STEP THREE

    DEVELOP AWARENESS OF THE SLUMP AS A DIRECT RESULT OF "FAULTY MENTAL STRATEGIES"
    Slumps are most often self-maintained by what the athlete says to him/herself Just before an at-bat or play in the field. As a coach you want to find out how the athlete sets themselves up by discovering their preperformance self-talk, imagery and focus.

    STEP FOUR

    NORMALIZE AND REFRAME THE SLUMP
    Slumps and failure in this sport are normal. To be successful you must learn to deal with and master failure. The slump is a direct result of what the player says to themselves about their failures. Help your athletes reframe the meaning of those bad games as what they need to do to have the good ones.

    STEP FIVE

    CHALLENGE FAULTY BELIEFS
    The slumping ballplayer has stopped believing in themselves. If left unchecked these negative beliefs will continue to keep them stuck. As a coach you have to help the athlete restore this belief. Catch them doing things right. Help them remember their successes (the slumping athlete develops "amnesia" for their good games). Confront their negativity and challenge their can't. Let them know in as many ways as possible that you haven't lost your belief in them.

    STEP SIX

    RESTORE CORRECTIVE IMAGERY
    A slumping athlete has a tendency to always "see" what he/she doesn't want to happen instead of what they want to have happen. Help your athletes' "change the channel" and begin to focus on making that play, getting that hit instead on what they are afraid of. The more internal practice of the right images, the more chance the ball player will have of quickly snapping out of the performance difficulties.

    STEP SEVEN

    RESTORE PROPER CONCENTRATION
    The slumping athlete thinks too much and focuses in his/her head. When you're on, you're not thinking and instead, you're on automatic, focusing on the ball and just reacting. It's the faulty focus that's the main cause of the slump and that prevents the ball player from just trusting and letting the hits happen. Being too conscious causes the athlete to try too hard. Help refocus the athlete and distract their conscious mind from the at-bat or play.

    STEP EIGHT

    TEACH THE "HERE & NOW" RULE
    When you play well you're mentally in the "here & now". The slumping ball player is in the past, thinking about mistakes and failures, or in the future entertaining the "what-ifs". Or they are in the wrong mental place, worrying about you and their playing time or focusing on the umps or rowdy fans. Teach your athletes how to recognize when they leave the "here and now" of the performance, and to quickly get themselves back.

    STEP NINE

    REPROGRAM THOUGHTS/DEVELOP SELF-CONFIDENCE
    The slumping athlete maintains a lot of inner negativity. Help them work on changing their "mental diet". Help get them off all that "mental junk food" ("I stink", "I always", "I'll never" etc.). Do not collude with their negativity. Remember G.I.G.O., Garbage In, Garbage Out.

    STEP TEN

    TEACH STRESS CONTROL TECHNIQUES
    . Their nervousness gets in their way of relaxing and performing to their potential. Teach them how to control their breathing and muscle tension and you'll help them snap that slump.

    STEP ELEVEN

    ACT AS IF
    Have your athletes who are stuck, "act as if" they are not. Acting as if has to do with how the athlete carries him/herself. It refers to their posture. teach your athletes to act as if by carrying themselves like a winner on the outside, regardless of how they may feel on the inside.

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