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  1. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalOrange View Post
    thus, the chance of winning against an innately talented is a futile exercise given the same amount of physical dedication and mental isometrics applied?
    Mental isometrics? Hold that thought.

    You've rather argued yourself into a corner with this "innately talented" stuff. The reality is that no one really knows how "talented" he is. There are so many variables, and "talent" doesn't manifest itself at the same age in everyone.

    It's true that some players are fundamentally more talented than others. At the very least, some players have a slight genetic edge for badminton.

    However, almost all of the difference between amateurs and professionals is hard work. Unless you put in all those years of training, it's hard to know whether you are exceptionally talented -- because you will never reach your potential.

    Even among professionals, there are plenty of other differences. Some professionals do train harder, or differently, than others; some of them are more intelligent than others; some are more mentally resilient than others; and their physical builds differ too.

    So yes, if you're playing against "the perfect player", who has 100% talent, 100% dedication, 100% psychological strength, 100% physical condition, 100% intelligence and tactical awareness -- if you're playing against this guy, then obviously you can't possibly win.

    But this player does not exist. All players have some areas where they are not the best in the world. Just like any other quality, your psychology can be a strength or a weakness.

  2. #70
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    [quote=Gollum;1323839]Mental isometrics? Hold that thought.

    quote]

    Gollum,

    i'll hold that thought (what should i do w/ mental kinesiology?) until macazteeg comes back.

    meanwhile, just look at players who's psyching themselves up, talking at themselves...obviously they got at least some kind of help, mentally. yet, after their mental exercises on court, they started to think about their shots (they forgot they already knew their repertoire by virtue of doing it several thousand times in training that should've been automatic) but they blink, they think, they froze and they're done. so, where did the positive thinking go? probably they just can't blanket the fact their opponents are just that much talented than they are and realised their opponent obviously employs mental training too?

    of course, all mental failures aren't equal just as dedication from person to person aren't.

    what i think of mental training is still an abstract lab tool! thus, i wanna know more b'cos i don't know that much (even w/ four sems of psycholgy, aeons ago).

    kind regards,

    MetalOrange

  3. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimmeng View Post
    I'm taking part in a tournament this week, during round robin, i keep telling myself i can do, i can win it, i gave 110% during the game, the next day i realised that i had injured myself both my knee. My body took a beating.
    i feel like my mental strenth has overpower my body strenght which caused my injury...
    you have to listen to your body. unless it's the finals wherein you will your way, then after conquering it you can tend to your ails and aches.

  4. #72
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    Hi,
    My coach has told me that I how my opponents play. If we are in an intense game, then I will push myself very hard; however when I play against someone who is playing shabby, then I will just automatically play like them. I need help analyzing what is causing this and how I can fix this bad habit. ~ Thank Youu =)

  5. #73
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    Default hey bro!!

    Quote Originally Posted by kimmeng View Post
    I'm taking part in a tournament this week, during round robin, i keep telling myself i can do, i can win it, i gave 110% during the game, the next day i realised that i had injured myself both my knee. My body took a beating.
    i feel like my mental strenth has overpower my body strenght which caused my injury...
    so are you still injured up to now? in sport psychology this is what we called choking, or under performance. Somehow i can tell that you got pressured and underperformed during the tournament day. The nervousness/ pressure you felt made you move very stiff, thus your body is not relaxed and you failed to perform at you 100%. One reason why you choked is maybe the mental attitude that you had prior to the game

    To avoid choking it is very important that you have both good physical and mental readiness prior to competition. There is nothing wrong with the thinking that your up to perform at your very best, that is actually the goal every athletes has in their minds before competing. But to be able to be at your best you have to:

    1. Train physically, at your best prior to the competition, the goal of it is being able to perform what you've done in training in the actual tournament games.

    2. (maybe this is what you've missed) to relax, prior or before playing, to get over your nerves, relax, loosen your muscles up and think of what you have to do when playing

    You see, it is a very good mentality to think that you are going to perform at your very best. But your mind and your body must of course know how to do it, how to perform at your best. And to be able to do that you must relax instead of getting all hot and hyped up, relax, think happy and positive thoughts and everything you have to do during the game itself.

    Remember bro, this is just a learning experience in your playing career, use it as a motivation for your next competitions.. Good Luck bro and God Bless!

  6. #74
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    Default hi!

    Quote Originally Posted by ChaChaTea View Post
    Hi,
    My coach has told me that I how my opponents play. If we are in an intense game, then I will push myself very hard; however when I play against someone who is playing shabby, then I will just automatically play like them. I need help analyzing what is causing this and how I can fix this bad habit. ~ Thank Youu =)
    This is a very good question! Most of us feel tired or sluggish while playing with not so good players, unlike times when we play opponents our level or better than us. And once again it has a lot of things to do with our mentality.

    Of course, when we know that we can defeat our opponent easily we tend to relax and be overconfident. And most of the time that is why we lose to players lesser than us. We get tired of playing players who are not so good. This is also one of the problems encountered by god, pro players, Like Taufik Hidayat. When he plays greater opponents, he rises to the occasion and plays good, but when playing with lesser opponents, he does unforced errors which are not so normal of him.

    You see this has a lot to do with the mental aspect of the game. In an interview Lee Chong Wei once said, "I do my best who ever I'm playing with" that is why he is world no.1 at the moment. It is this attitude which makes him the best at what he does. Always remember bro, when you think that you are the best, when you think that you are already good, that is the time in which you stop learning, the time when you stop improving. Please apply the same mentality as the world no. 1.. Always remember to
    "Do my best whoever I'm playing with" and to always think that " I am not good, I am not the best, but I'm willing to fight the best and always give it all I've got even if the odds are against me." Remember dude, to be the greatest, you have to get a hold of yourself, you have to be mature enough to know and control yourself. Lastly, remember these quotes fromThe book Art of War by Sun Tzu:

    " If you know yourself and the enemy, you need not fear the result of a thousand battles, if you know yourself but not the enemy, you will win battles but will incur damage, if you don't know know the enemy nor yourself, prepare to suffer defeat."

  7. #75
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    [quote=MetalOrange;1323899]
    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Mental isometrics? Hold that thought.

    quote]

    Gollum,

    i'll hold that thought (what should i do w/ mental kinesiology?) until macazteeg comes back.

    meanwhile, just look at players who's psyching themselves up, talking at themselves...obviously they got at least some kind of help, mentally. yet, after their mental exercises on court, they started to think about their shots (they forgot they already knew their repertoire by virtue of doing it several thousand times in training that should've been automatic) but they blink, they think, they froze and they're done. so, where did the positive thinking go? probably they just can't blanket the fact their opponents are just that much talented than they are and realised their opponent obviously employs mental training too?

    of course, all mental failures aren't equal just as dedication from person to person aren't.

    what i think of mental training is still an abstract lab tool! thus, i wanna know more b'cos i don't know that much (even w/ four sems of psycholgy, aeons ago).

    kind regards,

    MetalOrange

    Hello mr. metal orange!

    Thanks for your opinions! Yes there are several aspects of how a player excels, or reaches the top. But there are much more factors to which a player wins or lose a certain match. You can give a thousand reasons on why you where defeated on a certain match. Well, it doesn't really matter how talented you are in a certain sport, or how many hours or days you train, although you possibly can't win without both. But to really be able to win, you have to apply both your talent and your training. Its how you apply it during actual matches/ situations, on how your mind and body adopts and just moves the way it should. That is why athletes do all those 'mental isometrics'. Its to bridge the gap between training and actual fighting. You do exercises for you to relax, to make your body respond the way you want it too and stuffs. Well in matches it actually boils down to all of the aspects, not just talent, training, and mental preparation. Even the worlds toughest athletes can somehow be defeated even if they are at their peaks. So again there can be a thousand reasons on why a certain player is defeated on a certain match.

  8. #76
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    [quote=macazteeg;1324555]
    Quote Originally Posted by MetalOrange View Post

    Hello mr. metal orange!

    Its ''to bridge the gap'' between training and actual fighting.
    dear macazteeg,

    tks vm. that's the needle in the haystack i am searching! right on!

    kind regards,
    MetalOrange

  9. #77
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    Whenever I get into a tie situation with an opponent (20-20, 21-21, etc) I find that I lose more matches than I win. What are some of the causes of this, and how should I overcome them?

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    Gollum,

    i wasn't really arguing innate talent into the equation nor was preparing to. it was honestly, a hypothetical query, reason being: i just thought it's an endless loop if we just focus on who's got the better mental makeup. ...and in order to cut the endless loop by way of deductive reasoning (my flawed reasoning i must admit), i thought mental 'kinesiology' might be easily deduceable.

    and i was wrong.

    Kind regards,
    MetalOrange
    Last edited by MetalOrange; 12-13-2009 at 04:39 PM.

  11. #79
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    macazteeg, you're only 19?! You have an amazing grasp of human psychology for your age, even though you know them as theories but you're applying them really well. Thanx for starting this thread!

    Re: mental rehearsal/visualization, yes, I find that if I spend a good half hour to do that while stretching prior to playing, I tend to play much better, faster, and quicker in my reflexes in predicting the opponents next shot.

    Re: psyching out your opponent, I find that if I stand in an aggressive posture when receiving serve, it usually works. So, racket up near the head level towards the opponent, good firm grip with a few stern shakes of the racket, and bounce just a little bit on your forefeet.

  12. #80
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    ooops, sticky fingers. double posting...sorry moderators, my bad.

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    dear macazteeg,

    congratulations! just finished treading backwards to the beginning of this thread. will you eventually do a PhD in clinical psychology? i hope you do. jia you bro. all the best to you and your future successes!

    MetalOrange

    p.s. just remembered dan inosanto once said why bruce lee is so good at what he does. dan inosanto said it was due to visualisation. bruce visualises or played out the fight before it happened. thus, he is so quick in anticipating his opponents moves.

    p.s.2. i hope you know who bruce was, young fella.

    p.s.3. ...reminds me that i am old(er).

  14. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalOrange View Post
    dear macazteeg,

    congratulations! just finished treading backwards to the beginning of this thread. will you eventually do a PhD in clinical psychology? i hope you do. jia you bro. all the best to you and your future successes!

    MetalOrange

    p.s. just remembered dan inosanto once said why bruce lee is so good at what he does. dan inosanto said it was due to visualisation. bruce visualises or played out the fight before it happened. thus, he is so quick in anticipating his opponents moves.

    p.s.2. i hope you know who bruce was, young fella.

    p.s.3. ...reminds me that i am old(er).
    hey bro! PhD is a very very long way ahead, i just graduated my bachelors degree dude! By the way Im a very big Bruce Lee fan, im a martial artist myself!

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    macazteeg, you're only 19?! You have an amazing grasp of human psychology for your age, even though you know them as theories but you're applying them really well. Thanx for starting this thread!

    Re: mental rehearsal/visualization, yes, I find that if I spend a good half hour to do that while stretching prior to playing, I tend to play much better, faster, and quicker in my reflexes in predicting the opponents next shot.

    Re: psyching out your opponent, I find that if I stand in an aggressive posture when receiving serve, it usually works. So, racket up near the head level towards the opponent, good firm grip with a few stern shakes of the racket, and bounce just a little bit on your forefeet.

    Thanks man! Maybe im just fortunate that i am an athlete at the same time a psychologist that's why I can easily apply the theories, but really im just trying to answer with what I know, and people will either go and agree with it, or dispute it. But whatever the case, im just trying to help anyway..

    Well, the goal of visualization is basically to make an athlete relax and think of what he/ she is going to do prior to a match. It uses both mental strategy combined with muscle memory to make each and every shot possible, in whatever situation you may be in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by macazteeg View Post
    hey bro! PhD is a very very long way ahead, i just graduated my bachelors degree dude! By the way Im a very big Bruce Lee fan, im a martial artist myself!
    oh, oh, oh! but i suppose you are into taekwondo or karate as they are de rigeur?

    ...ah well, PhD is just around the corner young man.

    more power to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AurorAX View Post
    Whenever I get into a tie situation with an opponent (20-20, 21-21, etc) I find that I lose more matches than I win. What are some of the causes of this, and how should I overcome them?
    well, there are a lot of reasons why it happens. I remember Bao Chun Lai having the same problem, except that he mentally collapses at the finals, that's why he almost always ends up having only a runner-up throphy

    Nyweiz, one reason you may have is that you collapse during pressured situations, when the odds are against you. Maybe not only on court but on all the aspects of life. You collapse or simply give up, especially in pressured situations.
    What you should do is to relax during these situations, think of what you have to do, and most of all rise to the occasion, see it as a challenge that you have to get over it rather than just to give up.

    I know it's easier said than done, but man think of all the hard rallies, hard earned points, all the shuttlecock you have to chase all around the court, after all of it, would you rather just give up at that point? or fight with all you've got till the very end? To get over these situation, you just have to have the mindset that each and every rally is crucial, as if it is always match point. Also try and take time to visualize the exact situation over and over and over again. When I say exact, I really mean exact, the feeling, how you breathe, the smell, the sight, or whatever. Most importantly when you visualize, think of what you have to do, never give in to the thought of losing or making unforced mistakes.

    Remember dude, It's just a game, yet life is a game you have to play, and you have to play it hard. Tough times don't last, but tough people do.

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