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  1. #1820
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    No need to mask it. The occasional short serve should be the surprise, not the other way around...

  2. #1821
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    I still think there's hundreds of things more critical than my serve to improve (which is even intentional, even if you may argue that short serve doesn't benefit me since I'm a slow player). There's a reason why almost every player serves short in A class tournaments, and most people do in B. I actually very rarely meet people serving consistently long in B class. All my opponents yesterday preferred short serve.

  3. #1822
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    That's because everyone wants to play like LCW or LD. For a lot of players, getting served high constantly and consistently (i.e. all serves with good height and length) gets pretty unnerving as they fail to gain a significant advantage and feel they have to attack and not 'waste' the opportunity by clearing.
    Your long serves, tbh, were too bad to plant that doubt - they were often short and not very high, enabling your opponent to score direct points too often.

    Before you argue - in our last league match, I advised our 2nd MS player to do just the same as his opponent didn't really have a life-threatening smash. His constant and consistent high serves managed to throw off his opponent, as he got unsure, not knowing what to do with them as his smashes got counter-attacked (esp. the crosscourt one) and his drop shots often got him into trouble as they were taken early and played to the net pretty accurately.
    And that level of competition, no offense, is ages ahead of yours (at least for now ).

    The argument that other things are more critical than your serve isn't so great btw - if you can't get into the rally properly, you won't be able to get into the match. Just look at Cheng Wen Hsing (did I spell that right?) - she has that one real weakness, her serve, and it probably costs her 50% of the matches she loses as she scores maybe 1 out of 10 points on her own serve.
    If your serve is lacking, always improve it. It's the most important shot in the game (while imop the most important aspect is footwork).

  4. #1823
    Regular Member ucantseeme's Avatar
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    @lordrogue

    Your serve need alot improvement. It's the first hit of the birdie and if your service is not good you will start with an disadvantage. I agree that you should do the high and deep service instead of your short service. The return of your opponent makes you struggeling.
    Your lunges are not space filling. You have trouble when you opponent lift your net shot.
    Your netshots need improvement, too. They are not close too the net and your contact point at the net is really low.
    IMO your body looks really stiff and not really relaxed. Tactical wise you are not able to take the control in the game. You hardly generate situations to smash and finish the rally or make your opponent struggeling.
    Often your contact point at the back is really low. So your footwork to the rear corners need improvement.
    Your footwork is not economic to cover the hole court. I missed the explosiveness in your footwork.

  5. #1824
    Regular Member drew tze en's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    Finally having watched it after ages, I spotted a couple things - first, as Cheung mentioned, you let the shuttle drop too low when you're going forward. If you commit more and push yourself further forward, you'll be able to take it much higher, and if you tumble it back to the net, you'll get it so tight you'll get the time back as the lift will need to be higher.
    If you play it long, you may catch your opponent still moving back to his base and force him to change direction mid-step. That will allow you both to play the shuttle flatter and to force him into awkward shots which will give you an advantage in the rally (at this level, a direct point or a very short lift).

    Second, you use too much wrist in your net play. The wrist you be nearly static, as wrist-based shots are pretty easy to read as the wrist requires larger movements to make a shot compared to making it with gripping action and maybe slight pronation/supination.
    To take out the wrist of your hitting action, raise your elbow fairly high, and when you play the shot, push through with the whole arm. It requires a lot more effort from your shoulder and back than playing the same shot by swinging through with the wrist, but once you get used to it you'll be much more deceptive and accurate.
    I know exactly what you'll have to do as I tend to use too much wrist as well and have to work on that aspect myself

    Secondly, whenever you jump you hit the shuttle when you're making contact with the floor after the jump. That is basically taking away all the advantages jumping is supposed to give you: a higher point of contact and thus better angle as well as the added pace you get by taking the shuttle earlier and not letting it drop.
    What works for me to get the feel for the right timing is intercepting shots in doubles - when you watch Cai Yun closely, you'll notice a lot of the time he'll jump upwards or slightly backwards to intercept a shuttle and hit it at the very highest point possible.
    If you play some shots like that (best get someone to feed you, the opportunity doesn't arise so often in doubles, and you'll not be able to use it when you're not used to jumping that way), you'll get the timing down correctly as you can't afford to drop back down when playing those shots. Try to hit your smashes/drops in singles with the same timing, even if it doesn't feel as powerful. If you want to use a bigger motion in the air, you'll first have to increase your hangtime by jumping higher.

    Well, that's the two most obvious things. Another thing you might want to work on is your general stance - when you're ready at the base, you're not as low as you could be and your racket is at your feet as well. Improving on that will enable you to respond quicker to every shot, which also means you'll be able to intercept more. The lower stance also works your legs and will help slightly with those jumps
    Well, this is an A/A* grade for this essay piece. hahaha

    Thanks for the comments on that video. I haven't really noticed about my net play properly, which isn't good but I used to using my wrist a lot and get tumbling net shots :/ which I find usefully because some opponents won't be able to receive it.

    I'll try and have a go at trying those smashes but I dont notice it when I'm playing a game, its only until I record myself do I notice it :/ I think I'll have to record another video soon and see how I play now... Its been a long time since I record that above.

  6. #1825
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drew tze en View Post
    Well, this is an A/A* grade for this essay piece. hahaha

    Thanks for the comments on that video. I haven't really noticed about my net play properly, which isn't good but I used to using my wrist a lot and get tumbling net shots :/ which I find usefully because some opponents won't be able to receive it.

    I'll try and have a go at trying those smashes but I dont notice it when I'm playing a game, its only until I record myself do I notice it :/ I think I'll have to record another video soon and see how I play now... Its been a long time since I record that above.
    Well, it's one of the most important aspect in net play as it plays a vital role where the deceptive qualities of your net play are concerned. Generally, the more wrist you use, the easier to read you are (at the net).
    Thinking of doing a quick video explaining the net shots as it's really hard to do so without any explanatory motions....but then again that'd be quite a bit of work

  7. #1826
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    @ lordrogue
    listen to jackie, he's definitely right with his analysis!
    i wanted to serve short (like the pros... ) for quite a time, but during the last year or so i changed back to 90% high serves. and it really helped my game.

    there are some exceptions, mainly against REALLY good smashers, but that's nothing you should worry about. at your level of play, a consistent, good quality HIGH serve to the baseline is always the better choice. always.

    a short serve in singles is well suited for
    a) really aggressive, offensive players (which you're not!)
    that are
    b) really quick and dynamic (which you're not!).

    that leads us to the 2nd point chackie already mentioned: footwork.
    again, jackie's damn right: footwork is THE KEY ASPECT of badminton.
    besides what jackie says (namely you're very upright position...), i think you should concentrate on establishing a good rhythm.
    you're play/footwork seems quite hectic and nervous. you run to the corner, stand there, jump back to the net, hastle around...
    really focus on:
    a) a neutral (deeper) ready stance
    b) split step
    c) maximum 2 steps to every corner, starting with an explosive initial step
    d) find your way back to your middle, ready position directly after your stroke

    it's been posted here a million times, but yet again, this video shows how to establish a good rhythm, every singles player should watch this (and do the exercise of course...;-))
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=up5M-mirAcI

  8. #1827
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    Not sure more footwork drills helps though, I never get to utilize it in a match situation... As you say my body becomes stiff and nervous so I won't move according to proper footwork anyway. It's not really match experience either, I've been to so many tournaments and it's always like that. After one match, my arm hurts a lot, after two I also get muscle cramps and it's all due to my body stiffening up, as it never happens in practice sessions. Somehow I need to just let go and see every tournament like some kind of exercise, but it's so difficult .

    Anyway, for the next time I'll try to focus on what you guys said, only roof serves and deeper stance.

  9. #1828
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Hm. I'm not exactly sure what you can do about the anxiety, but about the footwork - you have to do it in training, again and again, until it's so instinctual you won't even think about it. The better you are in training, the better you'll be in competition. Goes for everything, footwork, technique, tactical choices,.....
    Just out of interest, how many tournaments are we talking about when you say many? I mean there's not really a certain point where you stop being nervous, but it sure gets better with time. For me, it was probably about 1,5-2 years before I started (usually) playing better in competition than in training, as giving that extra percent really makes a difference when your nerves aren't getting in your way...

  10. #1829
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    It's a mental thing if your muscles are unusually stiffening up during competition but not in training.

    You have to reframe your mind to not put so much pressure on yourself. Concentrate on one point at a time.

    As Ben Kenobi once said "Let yourself go. Trust your training. Be at one with the Force."

  11. #1830
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    Hm. I'm not exactly sure what you can do about the anxiety, but about the footwork - you have to do it in training, again and again, until it's so instinctual you won't even think about it. The better you are in training, the better you'll be in competition. Goes for everything, footwork, technique, tactical choices,.....
    Just out of interest, how many tournaments are we talking about when you say many? I mean there's not really a certain point where you stop being nervous, but it sure gets better with time. For me, it was probably about 1,5-2 years before I started (usually) playing better in competition than in training, as giving that extra percent really makes a difference when your nerves aren't getting in your way...
    Being nervous is good, it sharpens your focus. It's not really extreme nervousness for me, it's just excitement. I can never get much sleep the night before a competition so i end up a wreck. I'm sure it's the same for a lot of people though.
    How many? A bit embarrassing to say because of how terrible I am but probably about 30 competitions over 3 years.

  12. #1831
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordrogue View Post
    Being nervous is good, it sharpens your focus. It's not really extreme nervousness for me, it's just excitement. I can never get much sleep the night before a competition so i end up a wreck. I'm sure it's the same for a lot of people though.
    How many? A bit embarrassing to say because of how terrible I am but probably about 30 competitions over 3 years.
    If you can't sleep the night before, it's not exitement, it's extreme nervousness!

    Relax, you're a hobby player and will never earn money with badminton, so enjoy your game and have some fun. Nothing to be nervous about...

  13. #1832
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    My 67 shot video was deleted but this week we managed a rally with 87 shots which is hoping to get uploaded by my friend which I'll post on this thread when it comes and I'll also post another video of us doing a match with the first to get 10 wins the game.

  14. #1833
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    This is the video of me getting 87 shots http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0e4rvG4JBM

  15. #1834
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    Sorry to say this but the forum mods wont accept it

  16. #1835
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan1990 View Post
    Sorry to say this but the forum mods wont accept it
    Why? 10char

  17. #1836
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan1990 View Post
    Sorry to say this but the forum mods wont accept it
    Maybe because you're new you cant post links yet?

    Post the link without http://www. Just do youtube.com/12345 or something

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