User Tag List

Page 65 of 126 FirstFirst ... 15 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 115 ... LastLast
Results 1,089 to 1,105 of 2127
  1. #1089
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    First points are well taken and I saw that for myself. I think I will be tougher on coach about feeding speed - this will help give me more distance to cover and force better extension.

    hmm, do you keep switching comments on BH from prep to after the stroke? I'm getting confused about which you refer to. After the shot, the racket really isn't very face down I dont think.

    I know what you are saying about inward/outward tumble (I play both), but if you are playing from very wide, you cant play outwards as you push the shuttle out. In any event, it's not what the drill was all about
    You need "time" to "show a hold" to your opponent. The coach's feed is too short and fast for you to practice the hold and hit effectively. You wouldn't have time to effectively wrong foot your opponent from a net return and in any case why bother when you have the whole diagonal at your disposal. If it's off a dropshot from the rearcourt then yes the hold and hit is an effective shot so the practice needs to be similar to the game situation, ie a racket feed from a deeper position in the court. Bearing in mind also, your opponent is moving in from a rearcourt position so any shot you play back to the rearcourt needs to be accurate especially if you're crosscourting to his forehand side! Feeding from the right place will also present you with a shuttle of similar pace and weight to the shot in the game.

    Practice the stroke move and accuracy at the same time.

  2. #1090
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    963
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    coachgary, agree, thats the point I was making, the feed/situation is wrong and the stroke isn't deceptive

  3. #1091
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Got a video of myself playing. I'm the one wearing a yellow singlet. Being a badminton addict that I am, this game happened about 4 hours before my marathon. LOL. I was supposed to be relaxing, but I just couldn't help it. I needed to play.

    Last edited by venkatesh; 07-24-2011 at 04:16 AM.

  4. #1092
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    Got a video of myself playing. I'm the one wearing a yellow singlet. Being a badminton addict that I am, this game happened about 4 hours before my marathon. LOL. I was supposed to be relaxing, but I just couldn't help it. I needed to play.

    Hi! It was nice to watch. You know what you are doing. So you are never late.

  5. #1093
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    hmm, it's not really back hand prep, but is maybe more face-down that I would normally have it.

    I changed the type of contact with the shuttle a few times - some are brush, some arent
    Hi! I like that "almost face down grip". Somehow it gives a relaxed feeling. That's why I try use that a lot.

  6. #1094
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    178
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Venkatesh

    I liked your game. You are always looking for kills near the net, your service is good & you are always looking for the attack. To me, these are the essense of badminton doubles.

    But it is difficult to judge your game by this video. You are not playing in a group who are really aggressive. Nobody is a hard smasher. And you partner is not attcking enough-He is relying on drop shots mainly. And many mid court smashes are also not finished. These all indicate, the group is not playing a really attacking game. Isnpite of that, you are doing your part decently.

    While serving, your racket is nearly upright-why? More horizontal racket may give you flexibility to play other shots and give more control on low serve. Just my thought.

    I woulf like to see you playing with a more advanced grioup where you will be really tested. Here, you don't need to earn attack-they are just gifted every now and then. Does not happen with good opponents.

    All the best
    Prince

  7. #1095
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,798
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simeon View Post
    Hi! I like that "almost face down grip". Somehow it gives a relaxed feeling. That's why I try use that a lot.
    yes, I have found that it feels relaxed too! It's similar to gade receiving!

    venkatesh:
    I noticed you could improve your positiong a bit - when your partener is in deep forhand corner, you seemed to stick to the T a bit when you are at the net. I think it would be better to take a step/step-and-a-half to the forehand side. Curiously, you already do this on backhand side but not the forehand.

  8. #1096
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    I liked your game. You are always looking for kills near the net, your service is good & you are always looking for the attack. To me, these are the essense of badminton doubles.
    I'm very glad that you liked the game. Thank you for the compliments. The essence of badminton doubles you just mentioned ... I learned it from BC. That's why I'm very thankful I became a member of this forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    But it is difficult to judge your game by this video. You are not playing in a group who are really aggressive. Nobody is a hard smasher. And you partner is not attcking enough-He is relying on drop shots mainly. And many mid court smashes are also not finished. These all indicate, the group is not playing a really attacking game. Isnpite of that, you are doing your part decently.
    These people are my Saturday group. I'm actually a member of a lot of groups. Some of them are more aggressive than this. I like playing with different varieties of players, may they be newbies, intermediate, or advanced. Of course, I'd rather play with advanced players so I could learn from them, but I try to play with lower levels so they can also learn from me.


    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    While serving, your racket is nearly upright-why? More horizontal racket may give you flexibility to play other shots and give more contr
    ol on low serve. Just my thought.
    Have you seen Gao Ling serve? I'm a big fan of hers. I really like her serve. I have never seen a match of hers wherein she was not able to trick her opponents with her flick serve (add to that her very tight service). Her service is even more vertical than mine. Well, I got used to it so I just stuck with it. I tried serving almost horizontally. Well, it wasn't my cup of tea :-(

    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    I woulf like to see you playing with a more advanced grioup where you will be really tested. Here, you don't need to earn attack-they are just gifted every now and then. Does not happen with good opponents.
    Yes. I agree with you. If I get the opportunity to video it, I'd post it here. I still have a lot to learn.

    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    All the best
    Prince
    Thank you for the time posting this :-)

  9. #1097
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    venkatesh:
    I noticed you could improve your positiong a bit - when your partener is in deep forhand corner, you seemed to stick to the T a bit when you are at the net. I think it would be better to take a step/step-and-a-half to the forehand side. Curiously, you already do this on backhand side but not the forehand.
    Yes. I'm glad you noticed. I deliberately stay on the T when my partner is in the forehand corner. That's because I know that he doesn't like smashing much. If you're going to observe, he likes to hit a slow cross-court drop from the forehand. That entails that I have to protect my backhand side from counter drops instead of wait for a weak return from a smash, which is rarely done by my partner.

    Don't you think this is a better strategy as regards the positioning?

  10. #1098
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,798
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think it is better you tell him to not hit so many cross court shots

  11. #1099
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,798
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    and it's not the net shot that will be problem - you can still get to it easy enough. it is if their shot is line drive/push that you cant get. Then he definitely cant get it.

  12. #1100
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,725
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    Got a video of myself playing. I'm the one wearing a yellow singlet. Being a badminton addict that I am, this game happened about 4 hours before my marathon. LOL. I was supposed to be relaxing, but I just couldn't help it. I needed to play.

    The match itself is not so thrilling, mostly because of the slow pace, but you play very well.
    I noticed you hold your left arm in a somewhat awkward position sometimes, you never 'pull down' when you do a smash or drop shot. Doing that helps with upper body rotation - which you lack in some situations, most noticeably the smash. You have a decently powerful smash, but it could be better if you included upper body rotation. You just flex your body forwards, much like a football player on a header. Look at one or two videos of FHF or LD smashing (there are loads of slow-mos on youtube), they both have incredible smashes.

  13. #1101
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Pau/France
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    Got a video of myself playing. I'm the one wearing a yellow singlet. Being a badminton addict that I am, this game happened about 4 hours before my marathon. LOL. I was supposed to be relaxing, but I just couldn't help it. I needed to play.
    HI,

    you do play very well, but I noticed something odd.

    When you stand in front of the court, you are usually placed correctly, taking a step back and all, but then you rush forward as soon as you see that your partner played a drop.
    I think you should rather wait for the opponent to actually hit the shuttle before rushing for the kill instead of anticipating a net shot, because it leaves to much room behind you for the opponents to play a push or a drive effectively. Against this pair, it's ok, because they are very passive defenders, but against other people you will lose the attack very often, or make mistakes because of this.
    And even if they play a drop, then you stand too close to then net (in front of the service line) so you're not in the best position to counterdrop, if you can't kill it. Whatever happens, you should almost never wait for a shot standing before the service line.

    As the front guy, you job is to Keep the Attack on, no matter what. Killing drops comes in second. Try reducing the divorce zone between you and your partner, it will be more difficult for your opponents to gain the upper hand again.

    Would anyone else agree with me?

    Oh, and wait with your racket up ( you don't always do it), and above all more in front of you, you will be able to intercept/play a lot more shuttles, and they will be much easier

  14. #1102
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    England
    Posts
    123
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You guys have a steady game, good service and technique- though a bit too slow paced for doubles (I know you may play differently with better people).

    I think one area you do need to work on though, is partner awareness and court awareness as a pairing.

    Yes I'd agree with the above post too, by coming in too soon, you're effectively saying to the returner you have to get it past me, it also means you cannot get to the shot. If saw the opponent doing that, I would be moving the guy at the back around, effectively ruling you out of the rally- tiring him out massively because he has to cover a much larger area of court.

    5:35 is a good example, you move in too close when you should be covering the gap on the other side of the court when your partner goes wide.

    Andy.

  15. #1103
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The front court player's responsibility is to keep the attack going and wait for weak returns. If the rear court player smashes, the front player usually stands in the midcourt, anticipates for a weak reply and then pounce a kill. However, if the rear player hits a fast/slow drop near the net, mostly, there are only two replies: another lift or a drop shot.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuzo64 View Post

    I think you should rather wait for the opponent to actually hit the shuttle before rushing for the kill instead of anticipating a net shot, because it leaves to much room behind you for the opponents to play a push or a drive effectively.
    Oh, and wait with your racket up ( you don't always do it), and above all more in front of you, you will be able to intercept/play a lot more shuttles, and they will be much easier

    Let's assess this. Let's focus more on the latter case, wherein the rear player hits a fast/slow drop. If you're the front player, what do you think is the best position so you could make a kill? First, the fast/slow drop will hit near the net (tight), or let's say in front of the opponents' front service line. What does this tell you? It means that the defending opponent will be forced to go forward. Now, this means that the opponents hitting the shuttle toward our midcourt (push or drive) is crossed out. If ever they do, it will be a midcourt lift and will be very loose and high, and the best player to make a kill in this situation is the rear court player, as he can see the midcourt more and is always prepared for a kill. Thus, the opponents will hit either a lift or a drop shot. If they lift, the attack is maintained. The rear player will always be there to hit a smash or another fast/drop. If the opponents hit a drop shot, the front player is there to attack. If the front player remains staying at the midcourt, he will lose those precious milliseconds by doing split steps, lunging forward, and the works. Thus, the front player may even lose that precious net kill. However, if the front player rushes forward, knowing that midcourt shots are crossed out, there's more chance of making a net kill (see 2:11-2:13 and 2:39-2:41).

    I love watching mixed doubles. This is what the girls usually do. The girls are usually taken for granted, but I think successful pairs are those with good front ladies. And if you're going to observe, they raise their racket up high enough to intercept but not to high to block the guys' view and smash.


    Quote Originally Posted by AimUk View Post
    5:35 is a good example, you move in too close when you should be covering the gap on the other side of the court when your partner goes wide.
    Yup. My mistake. But please do note that I wasn't rushing forward this time. In fact, I was standing far behind the T. So this disclose the thought that I rush too much. Take note that I only rush if my partner hits a fast/slow drop from behind the court, which my partner usually does. Another thing, I wasn't expecting that I would help the rear court that early. Notice that it's the first lift (aside from the flick serve) and the first smash in the rally. Also, note the placement of the smash and the good defense (at that time) of the opponent. There are so many factors to consider.

    But then again, I still have a lot to learn. I try as much as possible to apply what I've learned from coaches and from this site. But I just want to clear it. I do not rush too much. It's just that the situation forced me to.

    Thanks for the comments, but I think the one that interests me the most (and the one that could be helpful) is that of j4ckie.

    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    I noticed you hold your left arm in a somewhat awkward position sometimes, you never 'pull down' when you do a smash or drop shot. Doing that helps with upper body rotation - which you lack in some situations, most noticeably the smash. You have a decently powerful smash, but it could be better if you included upper body rotation. You just flex your body forwards, much like a football player on a header. Look at one or two videos of FHF or LD smashing (there are loads of slow-mos on youtube), they both have incredible smashes.
    Thanks j4ckie. I'm very glad you noticed. I think this is very helpful. I'll work on this.
    Last edited by venkatesh; 07-24-2011 at 07:33 PM.

  16. #1104
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    England
    Posts
    123
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    There are ocassions when it's not the right thing to do, even if a drop is played.If the fast/slow drop is slightly loose, you will only be covering a small section of the court, making it hard for your partner. Moreover, a player will start spotting this pattern after a while and outplay you on it (moving their base forward to get drops earlier, holding their shots to wrong foot you etc..)


    If you look at 7:15, you could have intercepted on that shot if you were behind the T, which would have set you up for an easy point but you had already committed to a net kill. It means your effectiveness at the front is reduced and you're not active in the rally- your partner has to work harder. I do understand where you are coming from, but it's a risky way of playing, it opens your attack up to countering as well.

    I've always been told that for doubles attack rotation, if the partner has to move wide to hit, they are out of position, and you should be covering the gap they then create regardless at what point the rally it is. It is your job to maintain the attack as well as the person smashing at the rear- if your opponents run one person side to side, they can never hold an attack down for more than 2 or 3 shots. This is a vital concept to understand.

    at 5 :35 Yes the placement of the smash was weak, yes he returned it well. But you should have realised that by standing where you were (you were too far left), there was a massive gap on the right side of your court and the way he returned it, your partner would never have got there in time. Badminton is a dynamic game, attack turns to defence so quickly, you can't just assume you will be on the attack for a set period because your partner gets a lift.


    Don't get me wrong I think you are a very good player and your movement is a good strong point, I don't want to make it seem as though i'm picking apart your game, I think you capable of more than we have seen in this video for sure!

  17. #1105
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AimUk View Post
    at 5 :35 Yes the placement of the smash was weak, yes he returned it well. But you should have realised that by standing where you were (you were too far left), there was a massive gap on the right side of your court and the way he returned it, your partner would never have got there in time. Badminton is a dynamic game, attack turns to defence so quickly, you can't just assume you will be on the attack for a set period because your partner gets a lift.
    Thank you for the observation. There is a reason why I stand approx one step to the left side of the T. Maybe amleto could discuss this futher. I think there's a thread somewhere here regarding that position.

    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    venkatesh:
    I noticed you could improve your positiong a bit - when your partener is in deep forhand corner, you seemed to stick to the T a bit when you are at the net. I think it would be better to take a step/step-and-a-half to the forehand side. Curiously, you already do this on backhand side but not the forehand.
    Anyways, there is a lot about badminton that is a case-by-case basis. One theory may not be applicable to another, and decision-making happens in a split of a second. Given a different situation (different partner, different opponents, different mood), I would have done a different thing. For example, if I'm playing with a weaker partner, I wouldn't leave him behind the rear court. But then, in this match, I'm the weaker player, that's why I leave most of the shots for him (LOL).

    But really, thanks for sharing your opinion.
    Last edited by venkatesh; 07-25-2011 at 04:02 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Test - Post your playing style and your horoscope
    By Mikael in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 31
    : 09-08-2013, 09:13 AM
  2. [Other] Post all the HQ Videos here
    By lining in forum Badminton Tournament Video Sharing
    Replies: 3
    : 11-24-2010, 05:14 PM
  3. Post a picture of yourself in your Badminton playing gear!
    By SharpEye in forum Badminton Rackets / Equipment
    Replies: 3
    : 07-07-2010, 12:08 AM
  4. Post videos you've recorded yourself
    By darkwingduck in forum Badminton Tournament Video Sharing
    Replies: 4
    : 02-09-2008, 05:17 AM
  5. how to post videos/interview in BF?
    By *GaDe~CaMiLlA* in forum Chit-Chat
    Replies: 1
    : 12-27-2004, 06:41 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •