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  1. #7668
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    Default Knowledge of Medisave, MediShield among S’poreans poor: Study

    TODAY

    By Neo Chai Chin -

    5 hours 50 min ago


    How much do Singaporeans know about Medisave and MediShield? To find out, 39 fourth-year medical students from the National University of Singapore knocked on more than 1,000 doors in Geylang Serai in February.

    Preliminary findings of two studies yet to be published show that healthcare-financing knowledge is poor, and that two in five respondents are dissatisfied with the adequacy of current policies.

    The first paper on how well consumers understand healthcare financing reported that 36.8 per cent of 739 adult respondents lacked basic Medisave knowledge, and 81.3 per cent of them lacked basic MediShield knowledge.

    Six statements each on Medisave and MediShield, forming part of a larger questionnaire, were used to determine respondents’ knowledge. Respondents answered “true”, “false” or “not sure”, and had to get at least three basic questions on each scheme correct.

    Statements for Medisave included “Medisave is a national healthcare savings scheme designed to help members pay hospitalisation expenses incurred in Class B2/C wards in restructured hospitals” and “Medisave comes from CPF contributions”. For MediShield, statements included “MediShield is an opt-out scheme” and “MediShield is a low-cost catastrophic illness insurance scheme”.

    Geylang Serai was chosen because it had two- to five-room flats, as well as the support of Member of Parliament Fatimah Lateef and grassroots leaders, said Adjunct Associate Professor Fong Ngan Phoon of NUS’ Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, who supervised the students.

    The first study is the first “rigorous door-to-door survey” to investigate knowledge level in this area and associated factors such as respondents’ housing type, computer literacy and previous usage of one’s Medisave account, stated the paper’s abstract in a recent Academy of Medicine Singapore publication.

    “We hope this study provides useful local data for policymakers to improve Singapore’s healthcare financing framework.”

    The second study hypothesised that “considerable dissatisfaction towards healthcare policies in Singapore exists”. Its abstract noted recent revisions to healthcare-financing policies to give citizens greater peace of mind. Of 725 respondents, 61.1 per cent were satisfied with the current framework, with higher satisfaction among those who are younger, female, and who perceived an improved understanding after using the framework.

  2. #7669
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Malaysian is first condemned drug trafficker to be spared the gallows following new l

    Published on Nov 14, 2013
    11:50 AM


    By Selina Lum


    After a four-year fight and a string of unsuccessful bids to challenge his death sentence, drug trafficker Yong Vui Kong, 25, finally be spared the death sentence.

    The Malaysian was on Thursday re-sentenced to life imprisonment and 15 strokes of the cane by the High Court. This follows changes to the law this year, giving judges the discretion to impose life terms and caning on drug couriers who substantively assist the Central Narcotics Bureau.

    Yong is the first convicted drug trafficker awaiting his death sentence to be given a chance to under the new law.

    In September, the Attorney-General's Chambers said it will certify that he had helped the authorities here disrupt drug-trafficking activities.


    'Govt aware Yong could escape gallows, but changes to law made for society's benefit'


    Published on Nov 14, 2013
    10:53 PM






    The Government was aware that drug mule Yong Vui Kong could escape the gallows when it proposed lifting the mandatory drug penalty, said Law Minister K. Shanmugam on Thursday. -- FILE PHOTO: REUTERS



    By Rachel Chang In Colombo, Sri Lanka


    The Government was aware that drug mule Yong Vui Kong could escape the gallows when it proposed lifting the mandatory drug penalty, said Law Minister K. Shanmugam on Thursday.

    But it went ahead with the changes for the benefit of the wider society, he told reporters on the sidelines of a gathering of Commonwealth foreign ministers here.

    "We were certainly aware of the possibility that he could be one of those to benefit from the changes, because we know that he had given some information which led to the arrest of someone else more senior in the hierarchy and that had helped us," Mr Shanmugam said.

    "It was a case that seemed to fit within the changes we were making but we made those changes because it was in the interest of society as a whole."

  3. #7670
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Traffic cops commended for rejecting $3k bribe

    Published on Nov 14, 2013
    8:02 AM




    Cpl Ng (left) and Sgt Fadli were manning a roadblock in July when they were offered a $3,000 bribe by a driver who failed a breathalyser test. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN


    By Yeo Sam Jo

    Traffic police officers Sergeant Fadli Shaifuddin Mohamed Sani and Corporal Ng Ching Heng were conducting a road block along Jurong Road in July this year, when they stopped a female driver who was suspected of drink-driving.

    After she failed a breathalyser test, she offered the officers $3,000 as a bribe and begged them to let her go.

    The two refused her offer and took the 38-year-old woman back to the Traffic Police headquarters for a second breathalyser test.

    "We had no second thoughts," said Sgt Fadli, who has been a traffic police officer for three years.

  4. #7671
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Big stadium needs big name

    Some feel no athlete has had enough impact for it to be named after him



    Published on Nov 14, 2013
    8:42 PM




    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...D_3920263e.jpg
    The main stadium of the Singapore Sports Hub under construction. It is off limits to commercial branding but can be named after a person. -- ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI









    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...3_3920246e.jpg
    Some household names were mentioned as possible candidates for having the stadiums named after them. They are sprinter C. Kunalan (above), long-time former 100m Singapore record holder; weightlifter Tan Howe Liang, Singapore's first Olympic medallist; swimmer Ang Peng Siong, once the world's fastest. -- ST FILE PHOTO



    By May Chen


    FOR the National Stadium or Singapore Indoor Stadium (SIS) to be named after a personality, it would have to be someone who has had a big enough impact on the country.

    And for several within the local sports fraternity, no one fits that bill - at least not yet.

    The possibility of naming both stadiums after personalities was raised by Acting Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Lawrence Wong on Monday, following OCBC Group sealing a $50 million, 15-year naming-rights deal with the Singapore Sports Hub.

    And, while the deal allows OCBC to carry its brand on venues within the 35ha park, both the National Stadium and SIS are off limits to commercial branding. But they could be named after individuals the nation wishes to celebrate and remember.


    As far as former sprint legend C. Kunalan is concerned, only an individual who has made a huge impact should be accorded the honour of having a national stadium named after him or her.

    Said the two-time Olympian: "He or she must have really influenced the progress of sport in Singapore and, until now, we haven't had anyone who's done that.

    "Everyone has played a small part. No one person can take credit for Singapore's progress in sport."

    Said sports historian Nick Aplin, who penned a book on Singapore's Olympians
    :

    "You'd want someone who had made an impact after independence because of national identity. At the moment, I can't think of a good one."

    International Olympic Committee member from Singapore Ng Ser Miang is not against the idea of honouring either of the stadiums after a personality. But he too struggled to name someone who deserved that accolade.

    Said Ng, who is a vice-president of the Singapore National Olympic Council: "I think if there's someone important enough for Singapore, then it's a good idea and it doesn't matter whether he or she is a politician or athlete.

    "But at the moment there's no one in mind. It has to be someone who has made enough of a sporting impact and is symbolic enough."

    Naming community buildings and infrastructure after personalities is not a new concept to Singapore. The Benjamin Sheares Bridge, along the East Coast Parkway, is named after Singapore's second president.

    Schools have also been named after the late presidents Yusof Ishak and Wee Kim Wee.

    Previously, there had been suggestions to honour former Law Minister E.W. Barker, who was instrumental in pushing for sports complexes in housing estates and was seen largely as the man behind the former National Stadium, for his contribution to sport.

    But those The Straits Times spoke to felt that, should a name adorn the main stadiums of the $1.33-billion Sports Hub, it should be a sportsman.

    Said Minister of State for Trade and Industry Teo Ser Luck, himself a long-time sports enthusiast: "He or she has to have affected the Singapore sporting landscape and inspired individuals. A lot of people might have achieved glory but not have touched the hearts of people."

    He used the example of the Anthony Nesty Indoor Stadium in Suriname, named after the swimmer who is the South American country's first and only Olympic medallist.

    He said: "Anthony Nesty inspired a very small nation (with a population of about 567,000) that things are possible. That's very historic. We have to be very sure about this person's influence, make sure it's worthwhile and can continue to inspire generations to come."

    Singapore may not have had any athletes with an impact like Nesty, but Nominated Member of Parliament Nicholas Fang believes the pioneers who set the momentum going have done enough to gain recognition.

    Said Fang, who is also chief of the Singapore Modern Pentathlon Association: "I think the stadium should be named after athletes who have blazed a trail for Singapore in the early days."

    He named former athletes like weightlifter Tan Howe Liang, Singapore's first Olympic medallist, swimmer Ang Peng Siong, and Kunalan as those that fit the bill.

    Yet, while a decision may have been made to exclude the two main stadiums from commercial branding, Aplin and Kunalan say a case can be made for selling such naming rights.

    Said Aplin: "There's no harm in linking it (the stadiums) to sponsors. It would only run for a few years and it's not a permanent fixture. But if you name it after someone, then that's forever."

    Added Kunalan: "Even if we did have someone worthy enough to have the stadium named after him, I'd still prefer to give it to a corporate sponsor who is willing to put in $100 million for the good of sport."


    Additional reporting by Chua Siang Yee



    Background story

    MANY PEOPLE CONTRIBUTED

    He or she must have really influenced the progress of sport in Singapore and, until now, we haven't had anyone who's done that... No one person can take credit for Singapore's progress in sport.
    - C. Kunalan

    NO ONE ICONIC FIGURE

    It doesn't matter whether he or she is a politician or athlete. But there's no one in mind. It has to be someone who has made enough of a sporting impact and is symbolic enough.
    - Ng Ser Miang, International Olympic Committee member from Singap

  5. #7672
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    Default MediShield Life Review Committee to submit suggestions within 6 months

    • The MediShield Life Review Committee, which was appointed by the Ministry of Health, expects to deliver its recommendations to the government within six months.


      SINGAPORE: The MediShield Life Review Committee, which was appointed by the Ministry of Health (MOH), expects to deliver its recommendations to the government within six months.
      At a media briefing on Friday, the committee's head Bobby Chin, who is also on the Council of Presidential Advisers of Singapore, said key issues the committee will focus on include ensuring better benefits while keeping premiums affordable.

      "With more benefits, premiums increase; so our job is to moderate this, and see how we can help the lower income and the elderly," he said.


      The committee will canvass views through consultations, focus groups, and online surveys.

      This will involve the public as well as stakeholders.

      The committee will also consult independent experts, for example health economists, to look at more technical aspects.

      Mr Chin said regular updates will be given periodically.
      The enhanced MediShield Life scheme aims to provide better coverage for large hospital bills and cover all Singaporeans.


      - CNA/nd

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    Default History of Singapore in 50 objects: A picture gallery

    Published on Nov 17, 2013
    8:34 AM




    (From left) An SIA kebaya, a coinafon and Tiger Balm. Tell us what items you think could help tell the history of Singapore. -- PHOTOS: MELISSA SIM, HAW PAR CORPORATION


    If you were asked to pick an object to represent Singapore, what would you choose? Tiger beer or Tiger Balm? An SIA kebaya or an Army T-shirt? The Merlion or Singa the Courtesy Lion?
    Taking a cue from the popular British Museum's 2010 radio series and book, A History Of The World In 100 Objects, (newspapers such as the New York Times also launched a similar project), Melissa Sim contacted musuems, archives and reference books to tell the story of Singapore through 50 objects.
    A list of this nature cannot be exhaustive. Tell us what items you think could help tell the history of Singapore. E-mail suntimes@sph.com.sg and use the header 50 objects. Click here to take a look at the list.

    The List

    • Durian, 1700s onwards
    • Malay coin of satu keping (one denomination), 1800s
    • Coolie trousers, 1800s
    • Night soil bucket, 1880s - 1987
    • Treaty between Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Sultan Hussein and Temenggong Abdul Rahman, 1819 (fascimile)
    • Brick from old jail which housed Indian convicts, 1820 - 1860s
    • Opium pipe, 1820s
    • First Singapore town plan, 1822
    • Singapore Chronicle, 1833
    • Earliest photo of Singapore, 1844
    • Raffles Hotel building plan (reproduction on a postcard), 1897
    • Bak kwa, early 1900s
    • Good Morning towel, 1920s onwards
    • A chettiar's table, 1920s
    • Tiger Balm, 1920s
    • Tin trunk belonging to Tang Choon Keng, 1923
    • Tiger Beer, 1932
    • Tin mug from a Malay Regiment, 1942
    • Tapioca, 1942 - 1945
    • Sook Ching victim's wallet, 1942 - 1945
    • Rediffusion set, 1950s
    • Ticket to New World Amusement Park, 1950s - 1960s
    • Zubir Said's piano, 1900s
    • Chicken rice, 1950s onwards
    • Hock Lee Amalgamated Bus Company driver tag, 1955
    • Meat safe, 1960s
    • HDB Key envelope - 1960
    • Tan Howe Liang's Olympic medal - 1960
    • Receipt for the National Theatre Fund - 1960
    • Merlion, 1964
    • Setron TV, 1965
    • Video recording of Lee Kuan Yew’s press conference announcing Singapore's separation from Malaysia, 1965
    • The Republic of Singapore’s first stamps, 1966
    • 4-D ticket, 1966
    • SIA Kebaya, 1968
    • No Long Hair poster, 1960s - 1970s
    • Rain tree, 1971
    • Coinafon, 1971
    • First courtesy campaign poster, 1979
    • Vanda Miss Joaquim orchid, 1981
    • Report on the collapse of Hotel New World, 1986
    • Or Else the Lightning God, 1988
    • Chewing gum, 1992
    • Army T-shirt, 1995
    • In-vehicle unit, 1997
    • Tissue paper packet - 2000 onwards
    • EZ-Link card, 2002
    • NEWater, 2003
    • Forehead thermometer, 2003
    • N95 mask, 2013
    Last edited by Loh; 11-16-2013 at 10:16 PM.

  7. #7674
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    Default Singapore Badminton Association appoints Ronnie Lim, 39, as chief executive officer

    Published on Nov 16, 2013 2:32 PM By May Chen The Singapore Badminton Association (SBA) has appointed 39-year-old Ronnie Lim as its new chief executive officer. He replaces Bobby Lee, 43, who resigned in September after being with the association since March 2011.Lim was the former general manager and head of capital markets at the Singapore branch of the Royal Bank of Canada. He had also previously worked at financial giants Citigroup and J.P. Morgan. The former school shuttler emerged from a field of more than 20 applicants, which was later trimmed to a shortlist of four. Said SBA president Lee Yi Shyan, who is also Senior Minister of State (Trade and Industry, National Development): "Ronnie brings along a wealth of managerial skills and industry knowledge that would benefit SBA in different but value-adding ways." Added Lim: "I have always been a passionate fan of sports, in particular badminton, so when this opportunity came up, I just knew that I have to take it.
    Last edited by Loh; 11-16-2013 at 10:36 PM.

  8. #7675
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default New environmental youth programme for students in the region

    Published on Nov 18, 2013
    10:03 AM


    By Audrey Tan

    Close to 130 Singapore and international students from India, China and the Asean countries will spend the next five days learning about global environment issues.

    They will make study visits to places like St John's Island and and attend lectures on climate change and marine life. The students will also have to present papers on energy, pollution and food security.

    The programme, which is for 13 to 15-year-olds, was launched on Monday morning at the RELC International Hotel along Orange Grove Road. It is a joint initiative by the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Singapore Technologies Endowment Programme (STEP),

    Second Minister for the Environment and Water Resources and Foreign Affairs, Ms Grace Fu said at the event: "We can't solve problems in isolation, in particular environmental issues, as they do not observe physical and sovereign boundaries. We need an approach of global inclusion and shared responsibility in finding solutions to our global issues."

  9. #7676
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Novelist Rachelle Toh, 14, to donate proceeds of book to charity

    Published on Nov 18, 2013
    8:23 AM




    While her peers were fretting over the Primary School Leaving Examination, Rachelle Toh spent her free time holed up in her bedroom imagining an enchanted realm. And writing about it. -- ST PHOTO: JAMIE KOH


    By Melody Zaccheus


    While her peers were fretting over the Primary School Leaving Examination, Rachelle Toh spent her free time holed up in her bedroom imagining an enchanted realm. And writing about it.

    Now the 14-year-old is a published author, with a generous heart. Her novel, The Call For Allegiance - Quest, the first in a planned trilogy, was launched at her primary school, Haig Girls' School (HGS), last Tuesday. All proceeds will go to charity.

    Rachelle's 170-page novel, which took eight months to write in 2010, details the adventures of three Singaporean teenagers after they are teleported into the enchanted realm.

    Her interest in fiction writing was sparked at the age of nine after chancing upon the children's book series Hell's Underground by Briton Alan Gibbons.

  10. #7677
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    Default NTU partners Imperial College to draw engineers

    Students will spend a year at leading UK university under elite programme



    Published on Nov 18, 2013
    8:13 AM





    A Nanyang Technological University (NTU) student displays his innovation at the pre-event showcase of the Engineering Innovation & Design Open House in 2011. NTU has managed to attract 50 top A-level students to engineering through its elite Renaissance Engineering Programme (REP), launched in 2011. NTU signed up one of the world's leading engineering schools - the Imperial College of London - as an REP partner, with top-ranked University of California, Berkeley, already on the list. -- ST FILE PHOTO: YAP NING


    By Sandra Davie Senior Education Correspondent


    For years, A-level students who did well in mathematics and science would shun engineering and opt instead for medicine, business or finance, because of the lucrative careers these offered.

    This year, however, Nanyang Technological University (NTU) may have made a start in reversing the trend: It has managed to attract 50 top A-level students to engineering through its elite Renaissance Engineering Programme (REP), launched in 2011.

    Now, NTU is adding to the appeal by signing one of the world's leading engineering schools - the Imperial College of London - as an REP partner, with top-ranked University of California, Berkeley, already on the list.

    Part of the draw of the REP, which combines the study of engineering with business and liberal arts, is that students get to spend a year at one of the partner universities before they take up internships at start-ups and companies abroad.

  11. #7678
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Government 'will look out for asset-rich, cash-poor' older Singaporeans

    Fairer tax regime, help schemes for sandwiched elderly: Lawrence Wong



    Published on Nov 18, 2013
    6:57 AM





    Acting Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Lawrence Wong(centre) having a dialogue session with residents at Siglap South CC after a ministerial visit around Joo Chiat constituency. With him are Joo Chiat MP Charles Chong (right) and Citizens' Consultative Committee chairman, Tan Yew Beng (left). The Government's move towards a more progressive tax system will help address the concerns of asset-rich, cash-poor older Singaporeans, Mr Wong said yesterday. -- ST PHOTO: RAJ NADARAJAN



    By Andrea Ong


    The Government's move towards a more progressive tax system will help address the concerns of asset-rich, cash-poor older Singaporeans
    , Acting Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Lawrence Wong said yesterday.

    In designing its tax system, the Government is "very mindful of this particular group of sandwiched Singaporeans",
    he said in response to concerns raised by residents of Joo Chiat in a dialogue.

    For instance, it has moved away from using Housing Board flat type as the qualifying criteria for Budget surplus sharing schemes, he said.

    These schemes now use the annual value of property, which Mr Wong said is a "fairer system" because owners of lower-end private property can also benefit.

  12. #7679
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Filipinos gather at St Vincent de Paul church to pray for victims of Typhoon Haiyan

    Published on Nov 17, 2013
    7:09 PM







    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...171120132e.jpg
    More than a thousand Filipinos gathered at St Vincent de Paul church this afternoon for a special mass organised by parish priest Father Michael Sitaram. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN








    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...171120132e.jpg
    More than a thousand Filipinos hold lit candles in solidarity as they gathered at St Vincent de Paul church this afternoon for a special mass organised by parish priest Father Michael Sitaram. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...171120132e.jpg
    The church choir leads during a prayer and worship session as more than a thousand Filipinos gathered at St Vincent de Paul church this afternoon for a special mass organised by parish priest Father Michael Sitaram. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...171120132e.jpg
    A churchwarden collects the donations for Typhoon Haiyan victims as more than a thousand Filipinos gathered at St Vincent de Paul church this afternoon for a special mass organised by parish priest Father Michael Sitaram. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN


    By Melody Zaccheus

    More than a thousand Filipinos gathered at St Vincent de Paul church this afternoon for a special mass organised by parish priest Father Michael Sitaram.

    They lit candles in solidarity and observed a moment of silence. They also held hands and lifted their voices as they sang and prayed for the victims of Super Typhoon Haiyan. The message covered themes such as restoration and healing.

    "Coming together to pray is important because prayer is a powerful tool," said Ms Marby Salgado, 29, a customer service officer, who experienced the typhoon while she returned to her hometown in Roxas, Capiz for a holiday last week.

    Her friend Ms Jaren Loyola, 33, whose two-storey family home in Eastern Samar, was also destroyed, said their hearts go out to all the victims. "We will continue to pray for the Philippines," she said, encouraging survivors to hang on as help is on the way.

  13. #7680
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    Default Details of next Master Plan for Singapore to be unveiled 'very soon': Khaw Boon Wan

    Published on Nov 18, 2013
    11:43 AM



    National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan speaking to participants of an Our Singapore Conversation (OSC) dialogue on housing last week. On Nov 18, 2013, Mr Khaw said details of Singapore's next Master Plan will be unveiled "very soon". -- ST FILE PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM


    By Charissa Yong

    Details of Singapore's next Master Plan will be unveiled "very soon", said National Development Minister Khaw Boon Wan on Monday morning.

    Mr Khaw gave no additional details of the upcoming plan, which will outline Singapore's upcoming physical development, but added that Singapore has come a long way since its first Concept Plan in 1971.

    "The underlying philosophy of making Singapore an endearing home and a clean, green, liveable city remains unchanged," he wrote on his blog.

    The Minister added that Mr Henry Wardlaw of Sydney, who in the 1960s had headed the United Nations consultancy team responsible for Singapore's 1971 Concept Plan, had returned last month for a visit. Mr Wardlaw, now 91, helped conceptualise Changi Airport's first terminal, the Pan-Island Expressway and the first MRT lines. During his visit, he interacted with Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) planners and was "overwhelmed and astonished" at how much Singapore had undergone.

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    Default River Safari's new attraction lets you glimpse native animals from boat

    Published on Nov 19, 2013
    8:22 AM



    Visitors will ride down a 483m-long man-made river and get up close to 30 species commonly found on the banks of the Amazon, including the jaguar and Brazilian tapir. -- ST PHOTO: DESMOND FOO


    By Melissa Lin

    While the real Amazon certainly takes a lot of beating, the driving force behind a new attraction at the River Safari reckons it can still trump the Brazilian jungle in some respects.

    Mr Cham Tud Yinn, director of exhibit design at Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said the much- anticipated Amazon River Quest boat ride that starts next month will have native animals to enhance the appeal.

    That, he added, is something you do not often see when going down some of the world's mighty rivers, as Mr Cham well knows.

    He spent many hours going with the flow along the Mekong, the Amazon and a river in the Taman Negara national park as part of his research for the new ride at the River Safari in Mandai.


    Background story

    SAFETY FIRST

    It's quite tough to balance realism and safety. Of course, safety is paramount.
    - Mr Cham Tud Yinn, director of exhibit design at Wildlife Reserves Singapore

    ANIMAL INSTINCT

    Of course, the animals have the option to go back into the bushes. If they find the crowd too rowdy, they may retreat.

    - River Safari assistant director of zoology Ang Cheng Chye

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    Default URA Draft Master Plan 2013:

    More housing in Holland Village, Kampong Bugis and new Marina South district


    Published on Nov 20, 2013




    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...219112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the new community park at the Holland Village Extension. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...319112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the new pedestrianised and gathering spaces at the Holland Village Extension. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...419112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the side view of the new community park at the Holland Village Extension. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...519112013e.jpg
    Shophouses and a park at Holland Village. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...319112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the Kampong Bugis precinct. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...219112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the Kampong Bugis waterfront park that will bring people close to the water edge. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the Kamgong Bugis rain water plaza that will be an attractive space for public enjoyment. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of Marina South's pedestrianised street, a place where you can enjoy the buzz and watch the world go by. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...219112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of Marina South's playground and courtyard, where you can interact with neighbours. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...319112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of Marina South's elevated landscaped walkway, where you can enjoy the paranomic views of the city. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...e19112013e.jpg
    People are seen flying kites at Marina Barrage. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of an aerial perspective of the integrated development at Woodlands. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...319112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the pedestrian mall at Woodlands Central. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of Jalan Kayu in the future. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    A view of the Pulau Ubin Boardwalk at Chek Jawa. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...219112013e.jpg
    A view of Pulau Ubin, which is known as a rustic getaway. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...119112013e.jpg
    A view of Serangoon Garden. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...n19112013e.jpg
    The Sky Garden on top of a multi-storey carpark. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...r19112013e.jpg
    A view of the elevated park connector across AYE. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...d19112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of one of the school fields that will be opened up for public use. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...s19112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of Tampines Town Hub. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...n19112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the Integrated Transport Hub at Yishun. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...k19112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the HDB Bedok Town Plaza. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...l19112013e.jpg
    An artist's impression of the Creative Cluster at Punggol. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY



    By Dennis Chan

    Holland Village will get a makeover and 1,500 new housing units will be added to this popular enclave near the city.

    Kampong Bugis will be further developed and could have about 4,000 private homes, with developers encouraged to explore car- and bicycle-sharing facilities.

    A new district will be developed next to Marina Bay called Marina South housing mixed developments, including about 9,000 private homes.

    And in the longer term, the Great Southern Waterfront project will take shape in coastal land freed up once the ports move from Pasir Panjang and Tanjong Pagar to Tuas by 2027.

    These are among the plans in the latest blueprint of Singapore’s land use for the future.

    The aim of the Draft Master Plan 2013, unveiled by the Urban Redevelopment Authority early Wednesday morning, is to build a closer community.

    The Master Plan guides Singapore’s land use over the next 10 to 15 years and is revised every five years.

    More homes will come up in new housing areas at Bidadari, Tampines North and Punggol Matilda as well as older estates such as Sembawang, Yishun, Hougang and Choa Chu Kang. In total, enough land has been earmarked for 500,000 new homes – mostly public housing.

    Fastest to take shape will be the changes to Holland Village.

    It will be extended to incorporate housing within mixed-use developments and have pedestrian-oriented streets, a new underground carpark and access road to divert vehicular traffic away from the centre of activities.

    New public spaces such as urban plazas and an exciting community park will also be built.

    URA is expected to launch for sale by 2015 a mixed-use site incorporating private housing in Holland Village.

    After 2016, there will also be new housing in Kampong Bugis, as well as Marina South, that will incorporate fewer carpark spaces and fenceless developments. This will allow unfettered public enjoyment of the waterfront.

    Kampong Bugis will pilot an eco-friendly, car reduced concept. Commuters will be encouraged to use the MRT, public buses and a future water taxi service as modes of transport.

    Given its location at the convergence of two major waterways - Rochor Canal and Kallang River - Kampong Bugis has also been identified as a pilot project for a high density, water sustainable precinct, incorporating stormwater management system, bio-retention basins and detention ponds.

    Marina South is envisioned as a lively mixed-use residential district in which green modes of transport will be a key feature.

    It will be people friendly, with an 800-metre long pedestrianised street and an underground mall spanning two Thomson Line stations at Marina South and Gardens by the Bay.

    An elevated landscaped walkway will let people move seamlessly between Bay South Gardens and the seafront.

    An underground network of car parks
    in this district is also being explored to allow people to have a more pleasant environment for walking and cycling at the ground level.

    Marina South will have buildings that are 30 per cent more energy efficient by introducing eco-features.

    Singaporeans can also expect a more vibrant city beyond 2027 after the PSA container terminals are relocated to Tuas, freeing up 1,000ha of land for development.

    Preliminary conceptual plans for the new area, known as Greater Southern Waterfront, include creating a continuous waterfront promenade from Labrador Park in the west to Gardens by the Bay in the east and damming up a new reservoir from the sea between Tanjong Pagar and Pulau Brani.

    The Draft Master Plan 2013 aims to make Singapore a better home for the people through:

    * Providing a quality living environment with a variety of housing options;

    * Bringing quality jobs closer to home and growing the financial and business hub in the city;

    * Expanding green and recreational spaces for all;

    * Building an endearing home;

    * Enhancing transport connectivity and accessibility; and

    * Enlivening public spaces.

    An exhibition of the plan is being held at The URA Centre, 45 Maxwell Road, from Nov 20 to Dec 19. Key highlights are also available for viewing at http://www.ura.gov.sg/MS/DMP2013.

    The public has until Dec 19 to provide feedback on the plan and proposals for new cycling routes and the Greater Southern Waterfront through the website.

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    Default 10 ways the URA's Draft Master Plan 2013 will affect your life

    Published on Nov 20, 2013


    By Maria Almenoar

    1. The Great South: An entirely new area called the Greater Southern Waterfront will be developed on 1,000 ha on the south coastline once the ports move from Pasir Panjang and Tanjong Pagar to Tuas by 2027.

    2. More Marina action: A district called Marina South will take shape next to Marina Bay with eco-friendly features, including bike paths and a 800 metre-long car-free street.

    3. Keeping that neighbourhood charm: Holland Village, Jalan Kayu and Serangoon Garden have been added to Singapore's list of "identity nodes" in recognition of their unique, historical charm. Over 70 buildings will be conserved including Alexandra Hospital, Commonwealth Avenue wet market and former military buildings in Seletar.

    4. Increasing community interaction: The new Marina South district and an expanded Kampong Bugis will feature fenceless, green housing developments to encourage interaction between neighbours.

    5. More homes in diverse locations: Bidadari, Tampines North and Punggol have been identified as new housing areas.

    6. Mature estates will be rejuvenated: New home options will be injected into Sembawang, Yishun, Hougang and Choa Chu Kang so that those who want to live near their families may do so.

    7. Shorter commutes to work: Growing regional employment centres such as Jurong Lake District, Tampines Regional Centre and Paya Lebar Central will mean jobs closer to homes.

    8. More job opportunities: New industrial sites at CleanTech Park, Wenya, Jurong West, Tuas, Seletar West and Lorong Halus will offer more job opportunities.

    9. Green spaces expanded: Close to 90 per cent of residents will live within 400m of a park as the Government extends the park connecter network, Round Island Route and Rail Corridor.

    10. A cycling-friendly city: Under a national plan, the cycling network will grow from the current 230km to over 700km. There will be better parking facilities, better lighting and smoother connectivity for cyclists among other things.

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    Default URA Draft Master Plan 2013: Exciting plans, but execution could be difficult, say exp

    Published on Nov 20, 2013



    An artist's impression of the Kampong Bugis precinct. Property consultants warn that while the plans offer "exciting" new proposals for some areas, the difficulty would be in the execution of these plan. -- PHOTO: URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY


    By Cheryl Ong And Fiona Chan

    The latest blueprint for Singapore's development offers "exciting" new proposals for some areas, while fleshing out details of ambitious plans that been hinted at previously, property consultants said on Wednesday morning.

    But they warned that the difficulty would be in the execution of these plans, many of which aim to make Singapore a greener city.

    Their comments came after the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) released the Draft Master Plan 2013 at 3am on Wednesday.

    The URA's proposals include planning details of the new Greater Southern Waterfront area that will be created after the ports move from Tanjong Pagar to Tuas by 2027. They also expound on the development of Marina South as a mixed-use residential district and on the enhancements of other well-loved areas including Holland Village and Kampong Bugis.

    In particular, the plans to develop Kampong Bugis could potentially make the area more exciting than Jurong, said Savills Singapore's research head Alan Cheong.

    "Kampong Bugis has grown organically over the years, driven partly by a mix of social and economic developments as Singapore grew," he said. "It's not like Jurong East - which was built on manmade reclaimed land - so it's easier to develop."

    Suntec Real Estate Consultants' director and head of research and consultancy Colin Tan added that the "freeing up of land for more waterfront districts", such as in the Greater Southern Waterfront, is a timely move.

    "Towns are becoming denser; this would make Singapore more liveable," he said.

    But he also noted that some of the plans announced by the URA could be difficult to execute. In Kampong Bugis, for instance, the URA is hoping to encourage car-sharing and bicycle-sharing programmes so that fewer commuters drive to work.

    The concepts "are nice but they still seem to be a utopian situation that we're working towards", Mr Tan said. "These plans are very far in the future and for now residents of Kampong Bugis could be finding it hard to imagine commuting by bicycle when they're taking the MRT to work every day."

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