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  1. #7991
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Don’t sacrifice carefully-built ties, minister tells Indonesians

    Minister for Social and Family Development Chan Chun Sing. Photo: Ooi Boon Keong


    Published: 08 February, 4:02 AM


    “The Indonesian government has its own rules, procedures and assessment criteria for determining whether to honour a person as a hero. This cannot involve any intervention from other countries,” he had added.

    Yesterday, Indonesia’s Vice-Chairman of the People’s Consultative Assembly Hajriyanto Y Tohari said Indonesia did not have to acknowledge the Republic’s concerns.

    “Singapore was indeed outrageous as it does not know that Usman and Harun were Indonesian national heroes,” Mr Hajriyanto was quoted as saying by The Jakarta Post.

    The newspaper added that Mr Hajriyanto considered Singapore to have been “excessive and callous about the two mariners” who were executed in 1968.

    “According to him, as conscious neighbours of Indonesia, Singapore should not have meted out the punishment,” the Jakarta Post report added.

    Mr Chan, who was the Chief of Army before he joined politics in 2011, noted in his statement that he had made many Indonesian friends over all these years, especially during his two-year stint in Jakarta as the Army Attache.

    “Indonesians have shown me that they are able to appreciate the fine sensitivities of a relationship. I am thus disappointed with this episode,” he said.

    Meanwhile, Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin said while neighbours and friends can and should forgive, Indonesia’s move sent a clear message that “we should also never forget”.

    He added: “It is one thing to remember your heroes from your wars of independence, or those who have built your nation. But it is another thing altogether when you celebrate those who had acted in a brutal and cowardly manner. There is nothing heroic about killing innocent civilians.”

    “Our neighbours have insisted that it is their right to name the ships as they see fit. That may well be so. But it is also our right to state categorically that this very act reflects callousness and disrespect.”

    Mr Tan revealed that his father used to work in MacDonald House and had a close shave on the day of the bombing.


    “He told me that he hardly ever took medical leave but happened to be off that day. When he heard the news over the radio, he was shaken, but hugely relieved as the bomb had gone off in an area where he could have been at,” Mr Tan said.

    He reiterated that apart from the three victims who died from the bombing, “many more Singaporean lives have been permanently scarred”.

    “When Elizabeth Suzie Choo, 36, died, six young children no longer had a mother. Mr and Mrs Goh lost their only child when Juliet Goh, 23, died ... Mohammed Yasin Kesit, 45, did not awake from his coma and left behind a widow and eight children,” Mr Tan said.
    Last edited by Loh; 02-09-2014 at 01:56 AM.

  2. #7992
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default

    Sorry, The first part of the above TODAY report which was missing:


    SINGAPORE — The statements made by Indonesian leaders so far on their country’s naming of a warship after two convicted marines reflected either a lack of sensitivity, a lack of care for bilateral ties, or both, said Second Defence Minister Chan Chun Sing yesterday.


    He added that he hoped the Indonesian government will not sacrifice the carefully built up relationship between Singapore and Indonesia to domestic politics or through carelessness.



    In a statement, which was also posted on his Facebook page, Mr Chan said he was disappointed by the decision of the Indonesia government as well as the reactions of the Indonesian leaders who have spoken on the issue to date.


    Mr Chan, who is also Minister for Social and Family Development, pointed out that bilateral relations were built up with care over many years.


    “Despite the dark episode of the Konfrontasi and MacDonald House bombing, our leaders Mr Lee Kuan Yew and Pak Suharto demonstrated great statesmanship to bring closure to the difficult moments and worked together to usher in a new era of cooperation for mutual benefit,” he said.


    “I hope the new generation of Indonesian leaders will display similar wisdom and leadership to put bilateral ties foremost in all that we do. And not to do anything to reopen old wounds and hurt this relationship.”


    Indonesia’s decision was reported on Tuesday by Kompas. Since then, several Cabinet Ministers have conveyed Singapore’s concerns to their Indonesian counterparts.


    The Singapore leaders — Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean, Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen and Foreign Affairs Minister K Shanmugam — asked Indonesia to consider the implications and consequences of the move, among other things.


    The Indonesian leaders acknowledged the concerns but stood by the government’s decision.


    Coordinating Minister for Legal, Political and Security Affairs Djoko Suyanto said there was “no need to change (the ship’s name)”.

  3. #7993
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Jakarta's move 'reflects disrespect': Singapore ministers

    Two more Singapore ministers criticise naming of Indonesian Navy ship



    Published on Feb 08, 2014
    6:52 AM


    The warship KRI Usman Harun (right) with other new Indonesian Navy frigates at a shipyard in Britain. Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin said that ''there is nothing heroic about killing innocent civilians''. -- PHOTO: INDONESIAN NAVY


    By Leonard Lim Assistant Political Editor


    Two Cabinet ministers with military backgrounds took issue yesterday with Indonesia's decision to name a navy ship after two marines who bombed an Orchard Road building in 1965.

    In separate Facebook posts, Minister for Social and Family Development Chan Chun Sing and Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin said it reflected disrespect, callousness and insensitivity.

    Mr Tan, a one-star general before he entered politics, wrote in a Facebook post: "It is one thing to remember your heroes from your wars of independence, or those who have built your nation.

    "But it is another thing altogether when you celebrate those who had acted in a brutal and cowardly manner. There is nothing heroic about killing innocent civilians."


    Background story

    HEROES AND KILLERS
    It is one thing to remember your heroes from your wars of independence, or those who have built your nation. But it is another thing altogether when you celebrate those who had acted in a brutal and cowardly manner. There is nothing heroic about killing innocent civilians.
    - Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan-Jin

    CRYING CHICKEN
    Let Singapore keep shrieking, like a chicken beaten by a stick.
    - Golkar MP Hajriyanto Thohari, deputy chairman of the People's Consultative Assembly

  4. #7994
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Indonesian media says S’pore cancelled airshow invite

    Indonesia Air Force's Jupiter Aerobatic team performs a manoeuvre during an aerial display ahead of the Singapore Airshow. Photo: REUTERS


    Published: 10 February, 4:06 AM


    SINGAPORE — Indonesian media yesterday reported that Singapore had rescinded an invitation to the Chief of Staff of the Indonesian Navy and his delegation of around 100 junior officers to the Singapore Airshow, which starts tomorrow.

    An Indonesian Defence Ministry spokesman was reported as saying that he understands that the cancellation was connected to Indonesia’s decision to name a naval warship after two marines responsible for a deadly bombing on MacDonald House in 1965 that left three dead.

    When contacted by TODAY to confirm if the invite was indeed withdrawn, Singapore’s Ministry of Defence (Mindef) spokesman Kenneth Liow declined to comment. But when pressed, Colonel Liow did not deny the Indonesian reports.

    TODAY also understands that after a dialogue between Second Defence Minister Chan Chun Sing and Indonesia’s Deputy Defence Minister Lieutenant-General (Ret) Sjafrie Sjamsoeddin was rescheduled, Mindef was informed that Indonesia’s Lt-Gen (Ret) Sjafrie, along with three of his military top brass, have decided not to attend the airshow.

    Col Liow said: “MINDEF has been informed that Commander of the Indonesian Armed Forces General Moeldoko, Indonesia Deputy Defence Minister Lieutenant-General (Ret) Sjafrie Sjamsoeddin, Chief of Staff of the Indonesian Army General Budiman and Chief of Staff of the Indonesian Air Force ACM Ida Bagus Putu Dunia have decided not to attend the Singapore Airshow.”

    Metro TV News quoted Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal and Security Affairs Djoko Suyanto as saying: “Since the invitation was cancelled, (there’s) no need to go.”

    The Indonesians’ decision to name a new frigate KRI Usman Harun saw several Singapore Cabinet ministers, including Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean, Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen and Foreign Affairs Minister K Shanmugam, conveying their concerns to their Indonesian counterparts.

    Mr Chan also said the Indonesians’ decision reflected either a lack of sensitivity, a lack of care for bilateral ties, or both.

    The frigate was named after Osman Haji Mohd Ali and Harun Said, who were members of the special force that infiltrated Singapore during Konfrontasi and carried out the attack that killed three people and injured more than 30 others. They were tried and convicted, and hanged.

    Bilateral relations were restored only in 1973, after Singapore’s then Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew sprinkled flowers on the graves of the two men.

  5. #7995
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Lui Tuck Yew: Low-cost carriers and new air hubs reshaping aviation sector

    Published on Feb 10, 2014
    9:33 AM



    A worker peers out at the side of various airlines models on lay at the exhibition centre ahead of the Singapore's Airshow on Feb 9, 2014. The growth of low-cost carriers and the rapid rise of new air hubs will shape the future of aviation, Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew said at the opening of the Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit on Monday. -- PHOTO: AFP


    By Karamjit Kaur


    The growth of low-cost carriers and the rapid rise of new air hubs will shape the future of aviation, Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew said at the opening of the Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit on Monday.

    In Asia, low-cost carriers have grown from almost nothing 10 years ago, to accounting for close to 20 per cent of the market today, he noted. The growth is even more "phenomenal" in South-east Asia, where such carriers account for more than half of intra-regional travel.

    Regional air hubs have also been growing, he observed.

    These two trends - the rapid growth of LCCs and the new hubs - will shake up the business and operating models of traditional carriers and air hubs, Mr Lui said.

  6. #7996
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default KRI Usman Harun not welcome in Singapore waters

    Published on Feb 08, 2014
    8:00 AM

    Firemen removing an injured person from the side entrance of MacDonald House following the bombing by Indonesian saboteurs in March 1965. The Indonesian navy's decision to name a frigate KRI Usman Harun in memory of the saboteurs has provoked strong responses from the Singapore authorities. -- ST FILE PHOTO


    By David Boey

    Indonesia's decision to name a new warship KRI Usman Harun, after Indonesian saboteurs executed in Singapore decades ago for the MacDonald House bombing in 1965, sets interesting posers for Indonesia-Singapore defence and foreign relations.

    The 90m-long warship should not be welcome in Singapore territorial waters, as the so-named man-of-war would tear open old wounds sustained during a violent time in our bilateral relations.

    While ties are presently warm and friendly, the passage of KRI Usman Harun in Singapore's waters will inevitably turn the spotlight on the campaign of urban terrorism Indonesia unleashed against our island-nation during an undeclared war which history records euphemistically as the Confrontation.

    The choice of name would also ignite debate on what constitutes a "hero".

    If the March 1965 attack on MacDonald House by the two Indonesian marines was staged in today's context, it would be clearly and unambiguously defined as urban terror, and elicit the same degree of condemnation, odium and disgust civilised people feel towards war waged against unarmed civilians by saboteurs who flee once their sinister deed has been triggered.

    In essence, the bombing of MacDonald House by KRI Usman Harun's namesakes was carried out in that unseemly fashion. As soldiers, they obeyed their mission orders faithfully. This defence - that they were merely following orders - is the same smokescreen combatants brought to justice for crimes against humanity have hoisted to explain away or soothe over misdeeds like attacks on civilians.

    As fate decreed, Singapore police caught the duo after an islandwide manhunt. The Indonesian saboteurs, Osman Mohamed Ali and Harun Said, were tried and convicted for murder and hanged in Changi prison in October 1968.

    Executed as murderers in the Lion City, the dead marines were feted as heroes when their bodies were returned to Indonesia. News of their deaths angered Indonesian mobs, which sacked the Singapore Embassy in Jakarta.

    Alas, if you thought Singapore has put this regrettable episode in our bilateral ties behind us and moved on, the past caught up with us this week.

    So, while the vast majority of Singaporeans - youth and adults - would likely think of the fast-food chain upon hearing the word "MacDonald" in spoken form, we all received a refresher on our country's birth pangs when the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) shared its thoughts on the matter.

    In response to media queries on Indonesian press reports on the naming of a warship as KRI Usman Harun, an MFA spokesman said: "The two Indonesian marines were found guilty of the bombing which killed three people and injured 33 others. Singapore had considered this difficult chapter in the bilateral relationship closed in May 1973 when then PM Lee Kuan Yew visited and scattered flowers on the graves of the two marines.

    "Minister for Foreign Affairs K. Shanmugam spoke to Indonesian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Dr Marty Natalegawa, to register Singapore's concerns over the naming of the navy ship and the impact this would have on the feelings of Singaporeans, especially the families of the victims."

    Three Singapore ministers have weighed in on this issue, underscoring the gravity of the matter. On Wednesday, Mr Shanmugam registered his concerns with his Indonesian counterpart. This was followed on Thursday with calls made by Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean and Minister for Defence Ng Eng Hen to their Indonesian counterparts to reinforce the point made by Mr Shanmugam.

    We in Singapore should never forget the pain, the sorrow and the bloodletting, so senseless and indiscriminate, that the string of urban terror attacks inflicted upon countless Singaporean families during the Confrontation.

    Attacks against civilians are a heinous act of war that no military should be proud of, a dishonourable blemish, a smear on the operational record of any self-respecting armed forces, a cowardly hit-and-run affair unworthy of hero worship.

    That tainted record will be shouted out resoundingly at every foreign port of call
    , reminding foreigners both of the namesakes' dark deeds and Singapore's swift and decisive response to terrorism.

    The KRI Usman Harun episode is a teachable moment for Singaporeans. It is another update to our National Education library from a country which coined the popular catchphrase "little red dot", a reminder of how the sensibilities and sensitivities of our small island-nation can be brushed aside by mindsets that see themselves as the strong armed cukong (power broker), the dominant entity in an imagined abang-adik (big brother-small brother) relationship rather than one where neighbouring states are viewed as equal, sovereign entities.

    Singapore should tag KRI Usman Harun as a contact of interest as the warship is due to enter service later this year.

    Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) warships should politely decline any passage exercises with this vessel, as joint training with it would be a flirtation with a hull that fetes saboteurs who drew civilian blood on our soil.

    Singapore's warships should never come alongside that ship, be it for a heaving line transfer or courtesy call on its deck
    . Imagine the odd and unfortunate picture of RSN officers dining in the wardroom of that ship with portraits of its dead namesakes staring down on the assembled ranks.

    The RSN should further make it clear that that name plate will not be welcome within its naval bases, whether as part of the Exercise Eagle war games or naval shows like Imdex.

    It is well within the sovereign rights of nations to call their warships anything they want.

    It is also well within Singapore's sovereign right to decline the passage of men-of-war whose presence would reopen old wounds, whose show of flag would inflame and provoke anger and stoke memories of a deadly act of terrorism for which the authors paid with their lives.


    stopinion@sph.com.sg
    A former Straits Times defence correspondent, David Boey blogs on defence issues at kementah.blogspot.sg and is a member of the Advisory Council on Community Relations in Defence

  7. #7997
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Singapore Airshow's aerobatic display to start earlier

    This is to avoid disrupting peak-hour commercial flights at Changi Airport



    Published on Feb 10, 2014
    7:52 AM



    A static display of private aircraft at the Changi Exhibition Centre ahead of the Singapore Airshow, which opens tomorrow. About 90 aircraft, including the Airbus 350 and Boeing 787 Dreamliner, will be on display. -- PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE


    By Karamjit Kaur Aviation Corresponden

    Trade and public visitors to the Singapore Airshow which opens tomorrow will have to make an earlier start to enjoy the thrills and spills of the aerobatic flying displays.

    Except on opening day, the much-anticipated flying segment will kick off at 10.25am daily, about half an hour earlier than the usual start time at previous shows.

    The earlier start is to avoid Changi's peak hours so that fewer commercial flights are delayed, said Mr Jimmy Lau, managing director of event organiser Experia Events.

    The airspace is closed during the segment, which means planes cannot land or take off at Changi Airport.

  8. #7998
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default S’pore’s aviation hub status likely to grow: Rolls-Royce

    Mr Jonathan Asherson, Rolls-Royce’s Regional Director for Southeast...
    [More]

    Rolls-Royce employees prepare a Trent 1000 aero engine for testing at...
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    By David Bottomley
    Published: 10 February, 4:06 AM

    SINGAPORE — The Republic’s status as an aviation hub is likely to be enhanced as more companies will want to tap into the expanding aerospace ecosystem here, according to Rolls-Royce’s Regional Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific Jonathan Asherson.

    In an email interview with TODAY ahead of this week’s Singapore Airshow, Mr Asherson said the company had benefited from the country’s talent pool, infrastructure and geographical location as it ramped up its maintenance and manufacturing presence here, and other businesses will want to follow suit.

    Noting that a number of other leading companies and supply chain partners have set up their own facilities in Singapore since Rolls-Royce decided to expand its footprint here, he said the trend is likely to continue.

    “Combined with world-class connectivity to the Asia-Pacific region,” he said, “a highly-skilled workforce, strong engineering capabilities, comprehensive intellectual property laws and a pro-business environment ensure that Singapore is well positioned to capitalise on massive future opportunities from emerging markets and further strengthen its standing as an important aviation hub in the region.”

    Rolls-Royce accounts for more than 15 per cent of Singapore’s aerospace output
    and, with its joint-venture partners, employs more than 2,200 people. Its S$700-million Seletar Campus was opened in February 2012.

    Making such a major investment made sense for Rolls-Royce as Singapore is at the heart of a region that offers significant growth opportunities, said Mr Asherson.

    “Singapore’s location enables closer proximity to our growing customer and supplier base in an increasingly important region for us, with over US$11.5 billion (S$14.6 billion) new orders received in 2013 from customers in Asia and the Middle East.”

    But while Rolls-Royce has expanded rapidly in Singapore in recent years, it sees that there is still further room for growth. In May 2012, it signed a Memorandum of Understanding with local research partners and other industry leaders to establish an Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Centre (ARTC) in Singapore.

    “When it opens in the second half of 2014, the ARTC will serve as the first Asian location and the seventh in a global network of Advanced Manufacturing Research Centres aimed at developing innovative manufacturing and remanufacturing technologies,” said Mr Asherson.

    And as Rolls-Royce expands, Singaporeans are likely to reap the benefits.

    “With 40 per cent of Singaporeans having technology-related education, the country offers a skilled workforce who can be trained to develop high-value skills through internationally-recognised qualification programmes,” said Mr Asherson.

  9. #7999
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Airshow reflects Singapore’s position as major aerospace player

    Aircraft on static display at the Singapore Airshow. PHOTO: WONG WEI HAN


    More than 100 companies in industry, providing many good jobs: EDB Managing Director


    By Wong Wei Han

    Published: 10 February, 4:06 AM


    SINGAPORE — The Republic is fast becoming the top player in Asia Pacific’s aviation and aerospace industry, with a growing number of companies setting up shop here to leverage on its robust infrastructure and talent pool.

    And as Singapore kick-starts its biggest airshow yet this week, a strong global interest in Asia’s growth opportunities should further cement its status as a regional hub.

    “Today, there are more than 100 aerospace companies in Singapore that provide many good jobs and exciting careers for Singaporeans,” Mr Yeoh Keat Chuan, Managing Director of the Economic Development Board (EDB), told TODAY.

    There is a growing cluster of companies that are expanding their presence in the Seletar Aerospace Park, he noted, where companies such as Pratt & Whitney, Rolls-Royce, Bombardier and Meggitt have made significant investments.

    “Our talent and capabilities position Singapore well to ride this growth,” he added. “The prospects for the aerospace industry in Singapore are very bright.”

    Around 35,000 new aircraft are set to be delivered worldwide in the next two decades, with a third in the Asia-Pacific, the EDB said. “With our strategic location, Singapore is well positioned to ride this growth.”

    Reflecting the allure of Asia, the number of participants at the Airshow this year has grown around 10 per cent from the last event in 2012 to over 1,000 companies from 47 countries. The show will also feature more than 90 display aircraft, up from 2012’s 72.

    The United States, as this year’s feature country, has 163 companies at the show, including global giants Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Textron. Its stronger presence at the Airshow in part highlights the country’s commitment to Asia, US Ambassador to Singapore Kirk Wagar told reporters.

    “The real opportunity for growth is in Asia and a lot of our companies are already in this region, developing relationships with strategic partners … But with the Airshow, we also want to re-emphasise (US) President Barack Obama’s balance to Asia,” he said. “This is one of the most tangible weeks where people will see and understand what the US’s rebalancing to Asia is all about.”

    Meanwhile, ST Engineering also hopes to wow its international clients and folks at home during the Airshow, with the Singapore company taking up the biggest floor space this year.
    “We are showcasing our capabilities incorporating the latest technologies in aviation, combat and environmental solutions,” Executive Vice-President Of International Marketing Patrick Choy told TODAY.

    “We have grown with Singapore over the past 40 years and our revenue from commercial business is now more than 60 per cent of our total revenue,” Mr Choy added.

    Today, we serve customers across Asia, North America, the Middle East and Europe.” As a result, ST Aerospace — the group’s aviation arm — is ranked the world’s top maintenance service provider, having clocked 11.5 million hours of maintenance man-hours for commercial airframes globally in 2012.

    However, even with growing success at home and abroad, much remains to be done for Singapore’s aerospace industry, Mr Yeoh said. Part of that is to expand infrastructure to accommodate future growth. “To meet growing demand, we are working with JTC to accelerate Phase 3 development at Seletar Aerospace Park, which will add 60 more hectares of industrial land,” he said. “Singapore’s master plan for Changi East will also include a third runway and a Terminal 5 by mid-2020s, expanding our passenger handling capacity to 135 million people per annum.”

  10. #8000
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    Default 450,000 eligible for Pioneer Generation Package, says PM

    Singapore's pioneer generation was honoured at the Istana today, where Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced that 450,000 older Singaporeans will be eligible for the Pioneer Generation Package.


    Prime Minister Lee pays tribute to citizens 65 years and above at Istana par


    ByNeo Chai Chin

    Published: 10 February, 4:06 AM


    SINGAPORE — The contributions of the first generation of Singaporeans were what started the Republic on a remarkable journey and they taught us the values and spirit that enabled Singapore to succeed, said Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

    Paying tribute to the contributions of this special group yesterday, Mr Lee unveiled several details of the much-anticipated Pioneer Generation Package, which he described as a “sincere expression of our gratitude”.

    Those aged 65 years and above this year — in other words, those born in 1949 or before — and who became citizens before 1987 will qualify for extra financial support for their healthcare needs under the package
    he announced at a tribute party at the Istana for more than 1,000 guests from this pioneer generation. This was the first event of the SG50 campaign to celebrate Singapore’s 50 years of independence next year.

    The benefits for these 450,000 people, who are the first generation living and working in post-independence Singapore, include having to pay less in premiums for MediShield Life and getting extra subsidies for outpatient treatment at polyclinics, specialist outpatient clinics and general practitioners under the Community Health Assist Scheme. They will also receive additional annual top-ups to their Medisave accounts.

    The specifics of these benefits will be announced during the Budget on Feb 21 and those eligible will be informed in due course.

    Mr Lee also said everyone in the pioneer generation would get these benefits for life, with more for those who are older, so they get greater assurance in their golden years. He added that reducing their medical expenses would also enable these pioneers to save more for their other needs and reduce the burden on their children.

    Calling it a special package for a special generation, Mr Lee said: “But no matter how we design the package, it can never fully reflect the contributions that our pioneers have made to our nation.”

    For other older Singaporeans who do not qualify for the Pioneer Generation Package, he said the Government would continue to take care of them in many other ways that enable them to take care of themselves and their families. Explaining the package’s focus on healthcare benefits, Mr Lee said the Government’s consultations with the public have shown healthcare to be at the top of minds of older Singaporeans.

    He also noted that many in the pioneer generation do not have much in their Medisave accounts because the scheme had not been introduced when they were working. Even when Medisave was started, their low wages then limited their contributions to their accounts, he added.

    On the age criterion, which is set at those 16 years and above when Singapore became independent and would include those in the first batch of national servicemen called up in 1967, Mr Lee explained that people often started working in their late teens in the 1960s. The citizenship cut-off date of 1987 was due to gaps in the manual records of dates of citizenship registration before then, he added.

    In his speech, Mr Lee also touched on how these older Singaporeans’ contributions, both big and small, set Singapore on her path of development.

    Mothers and housewives brought up new generations of Singaporeans, while farmers, samsui women, traders and factory workers put food on the table and kept Singapore going, he said.

    Those in the Volunteer Corps or Vigilante Corps protected Singapore during Konfrontasi and kept streets safe from saboteurs, while the earliest regulars and national servicemen built up our defences, he added.

    As for doctors, nurses, and teachers, they took care of the sick and the young, and young officers in the public works and housing agencies built up our public infrastructure. And those volunteering in grassroots, unions, and political leaders rallied Singaporeans around the nation’s common cause, said Mr Lee.

    Noting that the nation will never forget their contributions, Mr Lee said: “You took part in the excitement and drama of the anti-colonial struggle, in the battle against the Communists, and in the fight against the communalists which led to Separation from Malaysia and independence for Singapore.

    “Despite difficult times and real danger of failure, you persevered, put Singapore first and worked together to build our nation,”
    Mr Lee told guests who included poet and Cultural Medallion awardee Edwin Thumboo, educator Carmee Lim and opposition politician Chiam See Tong.

    Mr Lee added that the biggest tribute that Singaporeans can pay to the pioneer generation is to build on their legacy and stay true to their pioneering spirit of self-reliance, having a never-say-die attitude and staying united in purpose

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    Default NTU-built drones to fly at Singapore Airshow

    Uni researchers’ system allows UAVs to fly without crashing into each other



    Published on Feb 08, 2014
    8:12 AM


    By Kenny Chee

    The air force's Black Knights will not be the only ones flying in formation at the Singapore Airshow. A group of drones built by the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) will be showing off some fancy aerial moves as well.

    This has been made possible after a research team from the university developed a system to solve the tricky problem of getting drones to move together, without crashing into each other.

    A possible use of the system, which took over three years to build, could be to co-ordinate the drones as they search for survivors in a disaster zone.



    Nanyang Technological University (NTU) shows off an unmanned aerial vehicle developed with the National University of Singapore and Ngee Ann Polytechnic at the Singapore Airshow 2014. The air force's Black Knights will not be the only ones flying in formation at the Singapore Airshow. A group of drones built by the NTU will be showing off some fancy aerial moves as well. -- ST PHOTO: NEO XIAOBIN

  12. #8002
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    Default NTU launches 3 new undergraduate degrees in 2014

    New courses include earth science, philosophy but uni to keep tech focus



    Published on Feb 10, 2014
    7:51 AM


    By Sandra Davie Senior Education Correspondent


    Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is launching three new undergraduate degrees this year - philosophy, earth science and one merging engineering with business.

    The university, with an annual intake of 6,000 students, will offer 95 places in the three courses starting in August. There will be 30 spots for the Bachelor of Engineering with Business degree, another 30 for earth science, and 35 for philosophy. All are four-year honours programmes.

    While NTU provost Freddy Boey admitted that offering a philosophy degree may seem like an odd choice for a science and engineering institution, he said this one will be different. It will include courses such as philosophy of science and philosophy of technology.

    "Science and technology has transformed our lives and will continue to do so. But there has also been a downside, for instance issues on environmental sustainability and the ethical limits to the genetic modification of animals and human beings," he explained

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    Default Malays who chose to stay helped nation succeed: PM

    Photo: Ooi Boon Keong


    Moment of choice in 1965 was significant in making Singapore what it is today


    By Neo Chai Chin

    Published: 10 February, 4:06 AM


    SINGAPORE — The pioneer generation of Malays who chose to remain in Singapore during the separation from Malaysia enabled Singapore to grow into a unique multi-racial and multi-religious society, said Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

    The Separation in 1965 was a moment of choice for the Malay community, between joining Malaysia as part of the majority and remaining in Singapore as a minority, he said.

    Many chose to stay and Mr Lee paid tribute to them during his Malay speech at yesterday’s Pioneer Generation event at the Istana, saying that they helped build a modern nation with many opportunities and a high quality of life.

    We are grateful for your confidence, loyalty and contributions,” the Prime Minister said, adding that the community has passed on to its children the values and ethos that will take Singapore forward.

    In his Mandarin speech, Mr Lee highlighted that the Pioneer Generation Package’s focus on healthcare would mean people have more resources for other needs, while also helping to reduce the burden on their children.

    The package is therefore not just a subsidy, but also a means to help pioneers live better in their old age, Mr Lee said.

    One of the guests at yesterday’s event, Mr Chng Bah Bee, 72, said the Package would give seniors assurance. A former port worker, Mr Chng said medication for his high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol cost over S$30 every three months, but that he and his wife, a cancer survivor, exercise daily and are well-covered by insurance bought by their children. “We took care of ourselves, and then the next generation,” he said.

    Meanwhile, Mr Lee also said Singapore owes its success to the pioneer generation, noting that the Republic had no natural resources when it became independent and the future was very bleak. But the pioneer generation persevered to ensure Singapore survived and grew, and their hard work set a strong foundation for the country’s development, he said.

    In paying tribute to the work of the older generation, Mr Lee said the package cannot fully repay Singapore’s pioneers for their contributions, but he hopes it will be accepted as a sincere gesture of thanks.

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    Default RSAF to celebrate 45 years with displays at Singapore Airshow

    The Black Knights fly in the new Spear formation, where four aircraft form the spearhead and the remaining two the tail, while executing the Spear Transition to Swan manoeuvre during a media preview at Pulau Sudong. Photo: Channel NewsAsia


    Popular aerial display by the Black Knights set to make return after five years



    By John Leong

    Published: 09 February, 8:25 AM
    Updated: 09 February, 8:30 AM


    SINGAPORE — The Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) celebrates its 45th anniversary this year and it will commemorate the occasion with visitors to the Singapore Airshow 2014, which opens its doors to the public next weekend.

    On show will be the ever-popular aerial display by the Black Knights, last seen at the Singapore Airshow in 2008, when the RSAF celebrated its 40th anniversary.

    The Black Knights, which is not a full-time aerobatics team, is also sporting a fresh look: The six F-16 Fighting Falcons now wear the Singapore flag’s crescent and stars on its fuselage, one of several changes the Black Knights have gone through over the years.

    The current batch is led by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Leong, a flying instructor in the 140 Squadron at Tengah Airbase ,who has clocked 4,000 hours on the F-5 and F-16 fighters.

    The 26-year veteran said Black Knights past and present are bonded by a common philosophy.

    He said: “The wisdom that they have given us, is not just the performance itself, but what the team symbolises — team excellence, professionalism, dedication, passion. And when everybody looks at us, they want to see that.”

    The aerial display of the Black Knights will be a major draw at the Singapore Airshow. Other aerobatics teams such as those from the US and South Korea will also be performing.

    Other aspects of the RSAF’s 45th anniversary celebrations at the Singapore Airshow will include a pavilion where visitors can learn how the RSAF works.

    The pavilion is divided into three zones. The first presents the RSAF’s heritage and transformation, while the second demonstrates its operational capabilities and the third showcases the RSAF’s people at work and at play.

    Also on display will be 17 types of RSAF aircraft and weapons systems, and a lucky few will get a chance to fly in a C-130 transport aircraft or Chinook helicopter.
    CHANNEL NEWSASIA

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    Default Inspiring sense of vigilance in S’pore youth a real challenge

    Deputy Director (Plans) of Nexus Judith Katherine d'Silva on 07 Feb...
    [More]



    To engage them, recent security threats, instead of only WWII events, should be highlighted, says Nexus Deputy Director


    By Xue Jianyue

    Published: 08 February, 4:02 AM


    SINGAPORE — Although Ms Judith Katherine d’Silva was born after World War II, tragic war stories told by her mother — about Ms d’Silva’s uncles dying during the Japanese Occupation, for instance — stayed fresh in her mind and reminded her of the necessity of Total Defence.

    However, these stories may not inspire the same sense of vigilance in the younger generation, said Ms d’Silva, who has been involved in engaging Singaporeans in Total Defence since 1999.

    “The current generation has not gone to war. It is a challenge for us to get people to understand it,” said the Deputy Director (Plans) at Nexus — the Ministry of Defence (Mindef) department in charge of Total Defence and National Education.

    Whenever war stories are brought up to young people, they will say “don’t keep on harping on that. It is so far away”, said Ms d’Silva, 61. She was speaking to TODAY ahead of this year’s Total Defence campaign, which starts next Saturday.

    People also have a misconception that Total Defence concerns external threats only. It involves protecting social cohesion, too, she said.

    To engage the next generation, Ms d’Silva felt that Singapore’s recent security challenges can be highlighted, instead of only the Japanese Occupation, which took place between 1942 and 1945.

    “It doesn’t mean (that) we forgot entirely about the past. It is just a shift in how you want to reach out to the young. You must get their attention first,” she said.

    One way Nexus has tried to involve more young people in Total Defence is through ciNE56, a short film competition. ciNE65 allows film-makers to express themselves through film on themes that revolve around national identity and sense of belonging, Ms d’Silva said.

    One misconception that many people have about Total Defence is that it is only about military and civil defence. These two pillars, she said, are simply more visible — compared with the social, psychological and economic defence pillars — because of the presence of hardware such as army vehicles.

    The rise of DRUMS — distortions, rumours, untruths, misinformation and smears on the Internet — has posed a new challenge for Singapore, with Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen saying in August that they could hamper Total Defence efforts.

    When asked what her department can do to address the impact of negative comments posted on social media have on social cohesion, Ms d’Silva said Nexus can continue our engagement efforts to build pride in, and a sense of belonging to, the country.

    “When we have the conviction that the peace we have enjoyed all these years is something we treasure and want to protect, we will know from deep within us how to behave and respond on social media.”

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    Default Showcase of vibrancy at Chingay 2014

    Published on Feb 09, 2014
    7:39 AM




    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...L_4026145e.jpg
    CHINA: The Fujian Ningde Huotong String Lions troupe displaying a local folk art from Fujian province with 1,000 years of history, which involves a performer using strings to control lion puppets. -- ST PHOTOS: LIM SIN THAI, DESMOND LIM



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...R_4026174e.jpg
    ITALY: Maesta della Battaglia flag-wavers and musicians playing drums and trumpets while putting on a vibrant show as part of an international medley at the Chingay parade. -- ST PHOTOS: LIM SIN THAI, DESMOND LIM



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...R_4026142e.jpg
    INDONESIA: Performers of the Gelar Tari Topeng, an Indonesian mask dance, which was accompanied by traditional gamelan music. A total of 500 performers from six foreign countries took part in the parade. -- ST PHOTOS: LIM SIN THAI, DESMOND LIM



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...W_4026144e.jpg
    JAPAN: Members of the Japanese Association in Singapore carrying a mikoshi (Japanese float-like portable shrine) as part of a performance titled ''Japanese culture: Smile for you''. -- ST PHOTOS: LIM SIN THAI, DESMOND LIM



    http://www.straitstimes.com/sites/st...L_4026175e.jpg
    President Tony Tan Keng Yam and his wife Mary waving at the crowds from the top of a float during the Chingay Parade yesterday. -- ST PHOTOS: LIM SIN THAI, DESMOND LIM



    Chingay this year saw twice as many foreign performers as last year, with many making the journey from South Korea, China, the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and even Italy, to join in the annual parade.

    A total of 500 performers from the six countries took part.

    President Tony Tan Keng Yam and his wife Mary yesterday joined People's Association (PA) deputy chairman and labour chief Lim Swee Say and PA chief executive director Ang Hak Seng at the closing night of this year's event.

    More than 3,000 performers took part in the Chingay Parade's finale, Knit With One Heart, last night.

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    Default New air traffic control centre to increase Singapore’s air traffic capacity

    Singapore's new Air Traffic Control Centre. Photo: Ernest Chua


    New long range radar can track more planes at a longer range


    Published: 10 February, 2:02 PM


    SINGAPORE — To meet growing demands of air traffic in the region, the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) today (Feb 10) unveiled its new Singapore Air Traffic Control Centre (SATCC) during the Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit Lunch.

    The SATCC houses the new Long Range Radar and Display System III – or LORADS III – which maximises advances in aircraft navigation accuracy and functionality, said Mr Rosly Saad, Director of CAAS Air Traffic Services during a media preview of the new centre.

    In operation since Oct 16, LORADS III is one of the most advanced air control systems in the world, with multi-surveillance features that enable air traffic controllers to track up to 2,000 planes at any one time, within a distance of 500 nautical miles.

    Singapore’s previous system, LORADS II, could track 500 planes within a distance of 250 nautical miles.

    “With Automated Dependent Surveillance–Broadcast procedures, we can reduce the spacing between aircrafts close over the high seas so that we have higher capacity to bring aircrafts in more efficiently and faster,” said Mr Kwek Chin Lin, CAAS Head of Air Traffic Management Operations Systems.

    Singapore’s aviation sector is expected to grow at an annual rate of five per cent until the end of the decade.

    The CAAS has trained 300 air traffic controllers to operate LORADS III at its academy, with plans to recruit another 80 controllers by the end of this year.

    The system, which costs S$300 million, is linked to other air traffic control towers in Changi and Seletar.

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