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  1. #1
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default The Importance of Sleep to avoid Heart Attack

    I like to share the following story with all sportspeople:


    Ranjan Das, CEO and MD of SAP-Indian subcontinent died after a massive cardiac arrest in Mumbai recently.

    One of the youngest CEOs, he was only 42.

    What killed Ranjan Das?


    He was very active in sports, was a fitness freak and a marathon runner.

    After his workout, he collapsed with a massive heart attack and died. He is survived by his wife and two very young kids.

    It was certainly a wake-up call for corporate India. However, it was even more disastrous for runners.

    The question arises as to why an exceptionally active, athletic person succumbed to a heart attack at 42 years of age.

    WHAT IS THE REAL REASON?


    Everyone missed out a small line in the reports that Ranjan used to manage with 4-5 hours of sleep.

    In an earlier interview of Ranjan on NDTV in the program 'Boss' day out', Ranjan Das himself admitted that he sleeps less and would love to get more sleep.

    Short sleep duration (<5 or 5-6 hours) increases risk for high BP by 350% to 500% compared to those who slept longer than 6 hours per night.

    Young people (25-49 years of age) are twice as likely to get high BP if they sleep less.

    Individuals who sleep less than 5 hours a night have a 3-fold increased risk of heart attacks.

    Just one night of sleep loss increases very toxic substances in body such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP). They also cause cancer, arthritis and heart disease.

    WHAT IS IDEAL SLEEP?


    In brief, sleep is composed of two stages: REM (Rapid Eye Movement) and non-REM. The former helps in mental consolidation while the latter helps in physical repair and rebuilding.

    No wonder when one wakes up with an alarm clock after 5-6 hours of sleep, he/she is mentally irritable throughout the day (lack REM sleep).

    And if somebody has slept for less than 5 hours, the body is in a complete physical mess (lack of non-REM sleep), the person is tired throughout the day and immunity is way down.

    IN CONCLUSION:

    Barring stress control, Ranjan Das did everything right: eating proper food, exercising, maintaining proper weight. But he missed getting proper and adequate sleep, minimum 7 hours. That killed him.

    We are playing with fire if we are sleeping less than 7 hours even if we have low stress.

    Do not set your alarm clock under 7 hours.

    Ranjan Das is not alone.

    From:
    Dr N Siva
    (Senior Cardiologist)

    PS: Do share it with all the Good People in your life.

  2. #2
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    Very interesting and I too am very active but sometimes sleep far less than I really should. I need to rectify this. Thanks for sharing.

    Kindest regards,

    -Ajay-

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  3. #3
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    Short sleep duration (<5 or 5-6 hours) increases risk for high BP by 350% to 500% compared to those who slept longer than 6 hours per night.

    Young people (25-49 years of age) are twice as likely to get high BP if they sleep less.

    Individuals who sleep less than 5 hours a night have a 3-fold increased risk of heart attacks.

    Just one night of sleep loss increases very toxic substances in body such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP). They also cause cancer, arthritis and heart disease.
    That article is too simplistic and sensationalistic, especially that paragraph above. Where are the studies to back up those findings?

    Like I said in the other thread, if all you need is sleep to reduce the risks of heart attacks, then sleeping pills will be marketed to prevent heart attacks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    That article is too simplistic and sensationalistic, especially that paragraph above. Where are the studies to back up those findings?

    Like I said in the other thread, if all you need is sleep to reduce the risks of heart attacks, then sleeping pills will be marketed to prevent heart attacks.
    I understand what you're saying but articles like are probably aimed at readers of all ages to understand and digest easily. So although I agree, there is certainly more to it than that, it simply emphasises the importance of sleep and how it could relates to cardio problems.

    I remember when my son was a baby, my immune system was so low due to lack of sleep, I caught the common cold at least half a dozen times in the first year, when I would usually only catch it once a year if at all normally.

    Sleep massively affects my badminton, not only physically but mentally as I seem to lack creativity and the concentration when I've had a bad nights sleep.

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Yes, sleep is definitely important, just as exercise, diet, family history, healthy living in moderation, etc.

    But to present it like it was done, for the purpose of sensationalizing to the naive reader who doesn't have a strong scientific background, who takes it at face value without questioning the validity of the data, that is irresponsible journalism.

    The author could have just said it was his opinion, but he used unproven statistics and pseudo science mumbo jumbo to present his case... that is what irks me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Yes, sleep is definitely important, just as exercise, diet, family history, healthy living in moderation, etc.

    But to present it like it was done, for the purpose of sensationalizing to the naive reader who doesn't have a strong scientific background, who takes it at face value without questioning the validity of the data, that is irresponsible journalism.

    The author could have just said it was his opinion, but he used unproven statistics and pseudo science mumbo jumbo to present his case... that is what irks me.
    I dont' know visor.
    You sound like a man who is justifying the common unhealthy doctor lifestyle!

    "Sure, residents need to work 48-hrs straight. If I had to do it, then they should have to do it, too! Didn't hurt me one bit! Whatcha say? Why am I so loud and cranky?!! It's not lack of sleep! Got a full 2 hours last night. Maybe just not in a row. All I need is another coffee. Now let's go operate!!"

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    I find the article somewhat .... speculative.

    Without references to research (and well designed research), the article is a bit useless for those who need a little more convincing. I like the bit where sleep is said to cause high blood pressure. Is it really causation or association (or speculation!)?

    And then, people vary with the amount of sleep they need. Some need more, some need less. People sleep less as they get older.

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    A quick google search didn't throw up any articles that looked like saying more sleep would prevent heart attack. I'm sure if there was such a research paper, it would have come right up near to the top of the list.

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    You didn't look properly Strong research conducted in 2011:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...rt-attack.html

    http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders...cts-your-heart

    http://www.drsinatra.com/a-lack-of-s...ck-and-stroke/

    Nothing goes on NHS website without good research behind it:
    http://www.nhs.uk/livewell/tiredness...lth-risks.aspx

    Kindest regards,

    -Ajay-

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  10. #10
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    I couldn't open the NHS website.

    Here's the crunch. Less sleep is a predictor of the risk.

    It could well be that a lack of sleep increases risk. However, there could well be another unknown factor (e.g. The busy lifestyle) that is the cause of both the lack of sleep and the heart attack. So, the lack of sleep is not a cause in this scenario. I notice the webMD site also did not say lack of sleep caused an increase risk. Merely that it's a predictor of risk. Careful use of wording means a big difference in the science and logical argument.

    And nobody proved sleeping more will decrease your chances of a heart attack but intuitively, it is unlikely that to cause much harm by sleeping a bit longer. Your cardiologist link extrapolated beyond the study that he quoted. It's wrong that he implied sleeping more will decrease risk of heart attack. But extrapolation beyond what the study actually shows is quite common in newspapers and those who want to draw attention to themselves....

    Sorry about that. I don't mind correct information based on good science but the above is the reason why 'sleeping more is good for the heart' needs more proof. It's only a hypothesis that remains to be proven.
    Last edited by Cheung; 01-24-2015 at 09:00 PM.

  11. #11
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.m.webmd.com/sleep-disorde...cts-your-heart

    "A 2011 European Heart Journal review of 15 medical studies involving almost 475,000 people found that short sleepers had a 48% increased risk of developing or dying from coronary heart disease (CHD) in a seven to 25-year follow-up period (depending on the study) and a 15% greater risk of developing or dying from stroke during this same time. Interestingly, long sleepers -- those who averaged nine or more hours a night -- also showed a 38% increased risk of developing or dying from CHD and a 65% increased risk of stroke.

    Researchers caution that the mechanisms behind shortened and prolonged sleep and heart disease aren't completely understood. "Lack of sleep doesn't necessarily cause heart disease," says Phyllis Zee, MD, PhD, professor of neurology and director of the Sleep Disorders Program at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. "It really increases the risk factors for heart disease."
    Last edited by visor; 01-24-2015 at 10:49 PM.

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    which is why I wrote 'sleep a bit longer'.

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