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  1. #5611
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default A*STAR, GE Global Research to develop medical imaging technologies

    Posted: 19 January 2012 1305 hrs


    SINGAPORE: The Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) is partnering GE Global Research to develop medical imaging technologies and diagnostics.

    A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by the two research institutions will enable more accurate, earlier and faster clinical diagnoses of cancer and other diseases.

    As part of the MOU, A*STAR and GE Global Research will collaborate to enhance medical imaging technologies, ranging from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to computed tomography (CT).

    The two institutions will also build on a close partnership with local hospitals, which may lead to more prescriptive and effective cancer treatments for patients.

    Mr Michael Idelchik, vice president of Advanced Technology Programmes at GE Global Research said more advanced diagnostic tools will be needed to help doctors become more prescriptive in their diagnoses and treatment regimens, to more effectively combat cancer and other deadly diseases.

    Professor Low Teck Seng, managing director of A*STAR, believes this win-win public-private partnership between A*STAR and GE comes at an opportune time with the increasing research interest in diseases affecting the Asian population.

    - CNA/cc

  2. #5612
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Changi Airport handles record-breaking 46.5m passengers

    Published on Jan 20, 2012

    By Karamjit Kaur, Aviation Correspondent


    It was a record-breaking year for Changi Airport, which handled 46.5 million passengers in 2011.

    This was 10.7 per cent more than the total throughput in 2010, Changi Airport Group (CAG) said on Friday.

    Low-cost carriers like Jetstar, Tiger Airways and AirAsia accounted for a quarter of the total passenger traffic and about 30 per cent of all aircraft movements.


    December 2011 was the airport's busiest month ever, with 4.53 million passengers handled - 11.4 per cent more than a year ago.

    (Singapore's population is only 5 million, which means the number of passengers is 9.3 times.)


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    Last edited by Loh; 01-19-2012 at 11:43 PM.

  3. #5613
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Convertible bonds will give GIC 8 per cent of firm's enlarged share capital

    Published on Jan 21, 2012

    By Yasmine Yahya

    The Government of Singapore Investment Corp (GIC) is investing almost $40 million in China's largest sportswear maker Li Ning.

    The Beijing-based company, founded in 1990 by former Olympic gymnast Li Ning, aims to use the funds to further promote its brand in China's huge market for sportswear and athletic shoes.

    GIC is making the investment through a subscription to 189 million yuan (S$38 million) of convertible bonds issued by the Hong Kong-listed Li Ning.

    The five-year convertible bonds will bear an annual interest rate of 4 per cent, Li Ning said in a statement on Friday.

    *

  4. #5614
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Swimming to a bigger future

    OPP chairman Teo confident sport will do well again this year, but challenge is to keep talent pipeline flowing
    by Tan Yo-Hinn
    04:46 AM Jan 21, 2012

    SINGAPORE - If there is a sport in Singapore that can achieve a breakthrough this year, it is swimming, said Olympic Pathway Programme (OPP) steering committee chairman Teo Ser Luck.

    Last night, at the Singapore Swimming Association (SSA) annual awards and appreciation dinner at the RELC International - where a total of S$19,554 in cash awards were handed out to national swimmers - the synchronised swim team and open water swimmers were honoured for their achievements at last year's SEA Games in Indonesia.

    With major meets like the London Olympics looming, Teo felt the sport had a strong chance to do well this year.

    "Hopefully for 2012, we can see a breakthrough, and my hope for this breakthrough actually comes from swimming," said Teo, who is also Minister of State (Trade and Industry) and the event's guest-of-honour. "Swimming has always had a very strong club culture, and that has helped to ensure that the pipeline continued through the years. The challenge now is how to keep this going."

    The SSA cash awards recognise the achievements of the National Sports Associations' athletes from the five aquatic disciplines under its purview - swimming, waterpolo, diving, synchronised swimming and open water swimming - that falls outside the Multi-Million Dollar Awards Programme run by the Singapore National Olympic Council.

    Florida-based Joseph Schooling, 16, who won three gold medals at last year's SEA Games and currently holds four national individual records and has qualified for the Olympics' 200m butterfly event, collected S$1,650 for his achievements, which includes national records in the 50m butterfly (24.06secs) and 200m fly (1min 56.57secs).

    Teo also supported the SSA's application last month for Joseph to be part of the elite S$6.5 million OPP, which provides additional financial, technical and logistical support to elite Singapore athletes with Olympic medal potential.

    "Joseph should be included in the OPP for 2016, and I think more (swimmers) should be included in the programme," he said.

    Aiming for a podium finish in the women's 100m fly at the London Games is Singapore swim star Tao Li, who picked up S$1,500 for setting three national records last year.

    "My training (under coach Ian Turner) is progressing well, and I'm happy with my times so far," said the 22-year-old.

    "I am aware of the huge expectations on me, which is why I cannot afford to let down those who have supported me, and the best way to do so is to give it my best shot."

    Last night's dinner also saw former Singapore star and current national coach Ang Peng Siong honoured with a Special Award for being the fastest swimmer in the world in the 50m free in 1982.

    SSA president Jeffrey Leow also revealed that a high performance fund - via donations from stakeholders, including parents, coaches, sponsors and clubs - will be set up to help with the association's training programmes and activities.

    He said: "At the moment, we are reliant on the Singapore Sports Council for high performance support, and it will be nice if we could have some additional support to lean onto if we need to."





    OPP steering committee chairman Teo Ser Luck has tipped the likes of swimmer Tao Li (second from right, seen here at the SSA's awards and appreciation dinner) to do well at the Olympics this year. Photo by TAN YO-HINN
    Copyright © MediaCorp Press Ltd


  5. #5615
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Why Singapore has the cleanest govt money can buy: Bloomberg

    'More important than reducing the potential financial benefits of corruption is increasing the probability of detection and meaningful punishment'


    09:34 AM Jan 25, 2012

    SINGAPORE - Singapore's Prime Minister, Mr Lee Hsien Loong, isn't often taken publicly to task. But when you make S$3.1 million annually to run a country, people tend to expect results. When they don't get them, the aggrieved masses turn to that lowest-of-common-denominator gripes: Hey, how much are we paying this guy?

    Lots compared with, say, Mr Barack Obama, who as United States president gets US$400,000 (S$507,000) a year. Mr Lee's compensation will fall 36 per cent, and that of Singapore's President will drop 51 per cent, to S$1.54 million. The cuts were based on the recommendations of an advisory committee formed three weeks after last May's elections, when Opposition party candidates made hay with the pay issue - and the ruling People's Action Party won with the narrowest margin since Independence in 1965.

    Such still-fat paychecks may give pause. Yet let's applaud Singapore for what it's trying to achieve by paying top salaries to leaders and ministers: Attracting the best and brightest to public service and reducing the temptation to engage in graft. Done properly, such initiatives can make government more efficient and economies more vibrant.

    Transparency International has ranked Singapore among the world's top five least-corrupt governments since 2001, and according to Worldwide Governance Indicators, an index supported by the World Bank, it has also been among the best governed.



    ASIA'S MIXED RECORD

    Since the 1997 Asian crisis, the region's other governments have had a mixed record in holding public servants to account, making growth more efficient, and creating the institutions - independent judiciaries, central banks and media as well as freer watchdog groups - needed to clean up political and economic systems.

    One way for Asian countries, home to a big share of the world's households living on US$2 per day, to boost their economies is to increase the pay of their civil servants.

    Take Cambodia, which ranked at the bottom of a recent regional Transparency International corruption survey. Its government workers pad their paltry, sporadic pay by demanding bribes for everything from birth certificates to school grades. One oft-cited International Monetary Fund working paper argues that paying civil servants twice the wages of manufacturing workers is associated with a reduction in corruption. In Cambodia, civil servants make less than half what a garment worker makes.

    In China, corruption is the common link between state-owned banks doling out billions of dollars to cronies; land grabs by local government officials; and the negligence that killed 40 people in a high-speed rail crash last July. If Beijing paid higher salaries, it might reduce the incidence of graft and rent-seeking that aggravates the lopsidedness of China's development. Its Gini coefficient, an income-distribution gauge, has climbed to almost 0.5 from less than 0.3 a quarter-century ago.

    Japan should consider fattening public paycheques, too. Although Japan's best and brightest are still drawn by the prestige of a government career, over the past two decades the differential between private and public salaries has grown. Ministerial slush funds help make up the difference, and in recent years, numerous scandals have arisen involving bureaucrats using such money for limousines, louche excursions, and golf-club memberships.

    More fundamentally, Japan's economic model encourages dangerous collusion between the public and private sectors. The root of the problem is "amakudari", or "descent from heaven". It's the main gravy train for public servants; when they retire, ministers and bureaucrats get cushy jobs in industries they oversaw while in government. The incentive is to look out for your future employer, not taxpayers.


    JAPAN'S ROTTEN EXAMPLE

    Japan's nuclear crisis, for example, was made worse by power-industry regulators focused on their post-government careers, not Japan's 126 million people. Pledges by Japan's ruling Democratic Party of Japan to abolish amakudari have gone unfulfilled. But for the sake of its citizens' welfare, Japan needs to end the practice, perhaps in return for better salaries and pensions.

    Of course, throwing money at corruption won't make it go away. If it did, countries such as Kenya, which pays its members of Parliament handsomely - more than US$13,000 a month - would be paragons of virtue instead of cellar-dwellers in Transparency International's annual Corruption Perceptions Index.

    Decent salaries are just one incentive that can tilt the cost-benefit analyses of potential bribe-takers toward probity: More important than reducing the potential financial benefits of corruption is increasing the probability of detection and meaningful punishment.

    Singapore isn't exactly a hotbed of anti-corruption muckraking. According to the 2010 US State Department Human Rights Report, journalists in Singapore practice "self- censorship", the level of public debate is "moderate", and opposition parties face "formidable obstacles". Yet the city-state does have an aggressive Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau; professional courts; a ramrod political will inculcated by its first Prime Minister, Mr Lee Kwan Yew (father of Mr Lee Hsien Loong); and a ruthless, relentless emphasis on efficiency and results.

    Not every country can follow that recipe, especially those with larger, more diverse populations. Still, countries like Cambodia can start by auditing its public services to get a sense of how bad corruption really is - something that it will have to do in any case to comply with the United Nations Convention Against Corruption. Civil-society groups can help greatly in that process: We think the UN would be wise to let them take part in the process it has created to review a country's anti-corruption efforts.

    Japan could benefit greatly from an independent watchdog agency to investigate corruption; given its global influence, we also don't understand why it is one of only 35 countries yet to ratify the UN convention.

    And even if the huge internal challenges of fighting corruption in China risk tampering with the prerogatives of Communist Party control, the government could crack down on the pervasive bribe-mongering of Chinese companies overseas, which presents a huge global challenge.

    There's an old saying in Asia that the real money is in government. Not the paycheques, but the kickbacks. Isn't it possible that a bit more capitalism at the highest levels of public service will make capitalism itself more efficient and equitable? We think Singapore proves it can.


    This Bloomberg editorial was first published online on Jan 25.




    Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong makes a speech, Jan 17, in Parliament during the debate on ministers' pay. Screen capture.

  6. #5616
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default S'porean completes ultra-marathon in Brazil

    09:06 AM Jan 23, 2012

    SINGAPORE - Singaporean runner Lim Nghee Huat has completed the Brazil 135 ultra-marathon race in a time of 46 hours and 15 minutes.

    The race website has ranked Mr Lim as first to finish the gruelling 217-kilometre event but added that official results will only be updated on the website later.

    Mr Lim, a business news editor at MediaCorp, is the only Singaporean invited to take part in the race.

    The time limit for running the ultra-marathon is 60 hours, which he easily overcame.

    Family and friends have also started congratulating Mr Lim on Facebook.

    Mr Lim has pledged to donate the proceeds raised from his run, to charity. CHANNEL NEWSASIA





  7. #5617
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Singapore well placed to cope with global slowdown

    08:50 AM Jan 24, 2012

    SINGAPORE - Singaporeans can face the future with confidence, even as the country braces itself for leaner growth over the next couple of years, said President Tony Tan Keng Yam.

    Dr Tan said that Singapore is well positioned to cope with the global slowdown because it has an educated and well-skilled workforce and one of the most business-friendly environments in the world.

    He said: "We have an educated and well-skilled workforce and one of the most business-friendly environments in the world. Unlike countries with high sovereign debt, fiscal prudence over the years has enabled the Singapore Government to build up our reserves, providing us with the resources to intervene when necessary to support our businesses and households."

    Dr Tan was speaking at the Singapore Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry's annual Lunar New Year celebrations yesterday morning.

    The Singapore Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry has its own share of concerns.

    It hopes the government will consider the current economic uncertainties during the upcoming Budget, when pushing through more timely help schemes for industries.

    The Chamber's president, Teo Siong Seng, said this is especially necessary to help alleviate the high operating costs of local enterprises.

    Mr Teo said 54 per cent of the Chamber's members are pessimistic about the economic future. As such, they hope that the government can help the businesses, especially the SMEs, in terms of the cost of doing business.

    Mr Teo also said that employee crunch is also a concern, where many of its members find that they are unable to continue or expand their business as a result of this.

    Hence, in the upcoming Budget, he hopes the government can help the businesses in terms of cost of doing business and the manpower problem.

    The SCCCI is also playing its role to help new immigrants integrate into society.

    It has rolled out courses on English at the workplace and English in the community for new immigrants to familiarise themselves with the language and also to integrate with society.

    The Chamber's Foundation will provide a 50 per cent subsidy to all citizens and permanent residents who enrol for this new course. CHANNEL NEWSASIA




  8. #5618
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Secondary students learn to innovate

    Varsity-level course combining business and design modified for Sec 1 and 2 students at SJI

    Published on Jan 23, 2012


    SJI students (from left) Ayden Mohan, Mark Wee, Oo Guoxuan and Daryl Wong at the Business Design Thinking class, which trains students to think like product designers and come up with innovative solutions to problems. -- ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM

    By Stacey Chia

    A course normally taught at university level to encourage innovation is finding a place in secondary schools as well.

    Starting this year, Secondary 1 and 2 students at St Joseph's Institution (SJI) will have to take Business Design Thinking, a course that incorporates business and design thinking, as one of their subjects.

    They will be taught business fundamentals and how to think creatively through theoretical and practical lessons.

    But unlike the courses offered in universities, especially in North America where such programmes are popular, the teaching of the subject will be adapted to cater to younger students, while still giving them an idea of what is required in business.
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  9. #5619
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    Default Former SCDF, CNB chiefs out on bail


    by Teo Xuanwei and Neo Chai Chin
    04:46 AM Jan 26, 2012

    SINGAPORE - Former Singapore Civil Defence Force Commissioner Peter Lim and former Central Narcotics Bureau director Ng Boon Gay had been arrested under the Prevention of Corruption Act, the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) confirmed yesterday in response to media queries.

    The pair, who are now out on bail, are "continuing to assist the Bureau in separate investigations", the CPIB said.

    However, as investigations are ongoing, it is "premature to assume" that Mr Lim and Mr Ng would be "ultimately liable for any criminal proceedings", a CPIB spokesman added in a statement late last night.

    According to the CPIB, Mr Ng was arrested on Dec 19 while Mr Lim was arrested on Jan 4.

    The CPIB did not reveal the bail amount of each man, whether others have also been arrested in relation to their cases and if there were companies involved in the proceedings against the two men. "Given the nature of our work, CPIB is unable to provide further details on the current cases," its spokesman said.

    The CPIB spokesman reiterated that the bureau "takes a serious view" on corruption here and all complaints and allegations of corruption are "carefully evaluated".

    Upon completion of its investigations, the CPIB will "refer the investigation papers to the Attorney-General's Chambers with the necessary recommendations", its spokesman said.


    The spokesman added: "Prosecutorial discretion when any criminal wrongdoings are revealed lies with the Attorney-General. In the case of public servants especially where there are no criminal wrongdoings but where there may be serious misconduct, the matter may also be referred to the ministry or agency concerned for the appropriate disciplinary action to be taken."

    How tender process works: MHA

    Mr Ng and Mr Lim, who have been suspended and replaced at their respective agencies, are said to have been in a close working relationship with a female IT executive at a company that supplied IT-related products and services to several government agencies. Their cases are believed to be linked to tenders awarded to the company.

    Responding to media queries, a Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) spokesperson said Mr Lim and Mr Ng are employed under a non-pensionable scheme for uniformed MHA personnel called the Home Affairs Uniformed Service scheme.

    The MHA spokesperson added that key appointment holders in Home Team departments are selected on "the basis of their ability, performance track record and conduct, and the officers are subject to periodic character and security checks".

    The MHA spokesperson said it follows a tender and procurement process set by the Finance Ministry. The tenders are published in the Gebiz portal for the information of all potential tenderers. Quotations are called for purchases not exceeding S$70,000 and tenders are called for purchases above S$70,000. The level of approving authority varies with the value of the purchase.

    Quotations are evaluated and approved by the respective Home Team departments. The tender bids received are evaluated by a Tender Evaluation Committee, which then submits its recommendation to a Tenders Board for approval.

    Tenders between S$70,000 and up to S$1million are approved by a Tenders Board comprising three senior officers from the Home Team Department. Tenders above S$1 million are approved by a higher-level Tenders Board comprising MHA HQ senior management and a senior officer from the Home Team Department.

    "The tenders are evaluated independently based on their own merits. For both quotations and tenders, there are segregation of roles between the officers evaluating the quotations/tenders and the officers approving them," said the MHA spokesperson.


    Allow due process to take place, says Head of Civil Service

    In a press statement, Mr Peter Ong, head of the Civil Service, said the Singapore Public Service takes a "firm stance" on upholding integrity in public institutions and among public officers.

    He said: "The current investigations reaffirm this stance. They show that the Government will take firm and decisive action, regardless of the position or seniority of the officer."

    Even as he acknowledged that news of the investigations must "come as a shock" to public officers, Mr Ong spoke of the need for due process: "We must be fair to the officers facing the allegations and establish the facts... further comments on the cases, pending completion, will not be helpful".

    Mr Ong reiterated that the public service has "built a reputation of professionalism and efficiency, and more importantly, of integrity". "It is critical that the people of Singapore continue to trust the Public Service," he added.

    He urged public officers to "remain steadfast in their duties ... and not let this affect our commitment to serve Singapore and Singaporeans". Said Mr Ong: "If anything, this is a good reminder to us all that public trust and confidence in our Public Service is a precious asset to be protected."

    Meanwhile, the SCDF and CNB assured the public of their commitment to carrying out their duties. The CNB said its work is proceeding as per normal and its officers remain determined and committed to controlling the drug situation here.

    The SCDF said the morale of its staff remains high and it looks forward to continuing its initiatives, programmes and outreach efforts

  10. #5620
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default NTU to kick off scholars programme


    by Ng Jing Yng
    04:46 AM Jan 26, 2012

    SINGAPORE - Amid the growing competition among universities, the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has introduced a scholars programme which it hopes will help "attract the creme de la creme of post-secondary students".

    The NTU University Scholars Programme, which was announced yesterday, will kick off in August with an inaugural batch of 50 undergraduates.

    Selected students from junior colleges and polytechnics will be invited to participate in the programme. The selection will be based on merit, said NTU, which has started work to identify potential scholars.

    Under the NTU programme, which is similar to the National University of Singapore scholars programme, participants are required to complete the modules for their majors but are given a special range of electives to choose from, including medical humanities and population studies.

    And apart from being guaranteed overseas exposure and accommodation at NTU hostels, the NTU scholars will be given opportunities to interact with invited Nobel Laureates and take part in leadership development camps.

    Speaking at a press conference yesterday, NTU provost Freddy Boey said its scholars programme aims to attract top students who would otherwise go abroad to study.

    On why NTU was behind other universities in having such programmes - NUS launched its scholars programme more than a decade ago - Professor Boey said: "There are good practices around the world and it is no surprise that good universities aspire similar things … Different universities evolve (at) a different part of the curve."

    The NTU scholars programme comes at a time when the Singapore university landscape welcomes several new entrants.

    The Singapore University of Technology and Design will take in its first batch of students in April; The Yale-NUS College for liberal arts education is also starting recruitment next month and the college will open officially next year.

    Prof Boey reiterated that the objective of NTU's new scholars programme was not to compete with the other universities here for students.

    Rather, by seeking to attract top students, NTU will raise its standards further and this will benefit the rest of the university community, he said.

    Victoria Junior College student Fiona Chong, 18, who is waiting for her A-Levels results, welcomed NTU's initiative. However, she was not sure if it was attractive enough to convince those who are bent on getting the overseas study experience.

    She said: "The primary factors in choosing a university would be on the courses and reputation of the university, having such a programme is just a bonus."

    Meanwhile, NTU said yesterday that it is raising its intake for the coming academic year - starting in August - by another 50 places, to about 5,930.

    Responding to Today's queries, NTU director of admissions and financial aid Lalit Goel said the university has put in "additional resources" to increase the number of existing scholarships by some 20 per cent, or about 70 more scholarships.

    He added: "The actual number of scholarships awarded is dependent on the quality of the applicants. All deserving students who need financial assistance can be assured they will receive one from NTU if they meet the scholarship requirements such as strong academic merit, good co-curricular records and leadership potential."

  11. #5621
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Chinese clan associations play important role in integration: PM

    by Tan Weizhen
    04:46 AM Jan 26, 2012

    SINGAPORE - One important mission that Chinese clan associations have today is to help new immigrants integrate with Singapore society, said Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong yesterday.

    These clan associations, set up years ago to help ease Chinese settlers into a new life here, still play a useful role as they help mitigate integration issues, such as social tensions, through cultural exchanges and social activities, said Mr Lee.

    Speaking at the Chinese New Year reception organised by the Singapore Federation of Chinese Clan Associations, he stressed: "This is important for maintaining order and stability in society, especially in multi-racial, multi-cultural Singapore."

    "Policies on immigration and population have far-reaching consequences, and we need everyone's support to reduce the negative effects, so that Singapore can keep on growing," he added.

    Mr Lee noted that Singapore has changed rapidly in the last 40 years but clan associations have continued to adapt to the times, defining new roles and directions for themselves.

    Calling on citizens to support them, Mr Lee also pledged Government support for the associations' activities.

    He promised help for the new Chinese Cultural Centre that the federation intends to set up within three years.

    The centre will strive to promote Chinese culture and arts, while highlighting Singapore's multi-cultural identity, said the federation's chairman, Mr Chua Thian Poh.

    Five clans were also honoured yesterday for their efforts in promoting Chinese culture, with the inaugural "Clan of the Year" award. They are the Nanyang Khek Community Guild, Foo Clan Association, Singapore Amoy Association, Singapore Foochow Association and Singapore Hokkien Huay Kuan.


    Photo by WEE TECK HIAN

  12. #5622
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default St Andrew's Cathedral celebrates 150 years

    President Tan attends special thanksgiving service at cathedral

    Published on Jan 26, 2012
    St Andrew's Cathedral, in City Hall, was the first Anglican church in Singapore. It took six years to build and was completed in 1862. The site was expressly reserved for an Anglican church in 1823 by Sir Stamford Raffles. The cathedral was gazetted as a national monument in 1973.

    By Jennani Durai

    St Andrew's Cathedral celebrated the 150th anniversary of its consecration with a thanksgiving service on Wednesday evening.

    The two-hour service was attended by President Tony Tan Keng Yam and his wife Mary, who are Anglicans.

    It included traditional hymns, Holy Communion and a sermon from Archbishop John Chew, bishop of the Anglican Church in Singapore and Archbishop of South-east Asia.

    Background story

    History of Anglicans here

    THE first Anglican settlers who came to Singapore were from the British East India Company, and arrived in 1819.

    Singapore's founder, Sir Stamford Raffles, reserved a plot of land specifically for an Anglican church building in 1823. Three years later, the Anglican Church of Singapore was officially founded.

    The first Anglican school in Singapore was St Margaret's School, a girls' school founded in 1842 by missionary Maria Dyer. The Anglicans built nine other schools in Singapore, including well-known schools such as St Andrew's Junior School, Secondary School and Junior College, St Margaret's Primary and Secondary School, and Anglican High.

    The second parish
    to be established was St John's Church, which was built in 1884 in Jurong.

    Of the 27 parishes in Singapore, the first church, St Andrew's, is the most famous.
    The Cathedral was gazetted as a national monument in 1973. As conservation rules set by the Urban Redevelopment Authority did not allow for changes to be made to conserved buildings, the Cathedral built an extension underground to cope with a growing congregation. It was completed in 2005 and is known as the Cathedral New Sanctuary.

    There are now around 20,000 Anglicans in Singapore, and the congregation at St Andrew's numbers 4,200.


    Background story

    Special liturgy was also included in the service to mark the 150th anniversary of the church's consecration. Wednesday also marked the conversion of St Paul to Christianity on the liturgical calendar of the Anglican Church.
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    Default New book on late minister Goh Keng Swee

    Published on Jan 26, 2012

    The book by historian Samuel Dhoraisingam chronicles his experiences while working under Dr Goh. -- ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN


    When the late Dr Goh Keng Swee was defence minister, he would show up unannounced at Singapore Armed Forces bases.

    On one such visit, he arrived to find the commanding officer was nowhere to be found. He was told the officer had gone to the Defence Ministry's headquarters, but that proved to be untrue.

    The next day, the officer, a major, was instructed to see Dr Goh in his office, and he walked out a captain. Officers who sent him poorly conceived reports would often get them back with comments like 'You must have your head examined!' written at the top. These examples illustrate how Dr Goh was a 'hard taskmaster', as described by former president SR Nathan yesterday at the launch of a book on the late minister, a founding father of Singapore.

    It was held at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. The book, Working For Dr Goh Keng Swee: Collection Of Anecdotes, is written by local historian and retired civil servant Samuel Dhoraisingam, 87.
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  14. #5624
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default Admiral Hill in Sembawang takes 'scholarly' turn

    Sembawang site now home to private school

    Published on Jan 26, 2012

    With its new campus at Admiral Hill, FIS Institute unites its 400 students, mainly Chinese nationals, from its two former premises. Lessons have already begun even as development work continues on the compound. -- ST PHOTOS: SEAH KWANG PENG

    By Jessica Lim

    Admiral Hill in Sembawang is up and running at last - as the campus of a private school - after years of fits and starts.

    The 5.6ha plot is now home to FIS Institute, a 12-year-old school which prepares its 400 students, mostly China nationals, for the O- and A-level examinations.

    The school used to be at two smaller campuses, one in Beach Road and the other in Ubi. Its new campus thus unites the two and makes operations easier to manage, said its principal Li Wei, 47.

    Admiral Hill comprises three buildings, including Old Admiralty House, a national monument. The black-and-white colonial house was originally used by Royal Navy officers in 1939 until the British pulled out in the 1970s, when it became a seafood restaurant.
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    Default SAF's 41 years in overseas operations

    From Afghanistan to Timor Leste, the SAF has been making its presence felt in peacekeeping missions, reports Defence Correspondent JERMYN CHOW

    Published on Jan 26, 2012

    The career soldiers of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) are not the only ones going overseas to serve in peace support or humanitarian relief missions.

    Pitching in too for such operations are national servicemen. In the last 10 years, 43 operationally ready national servicemen (NSmen) and 250 full-time national servicemen (NSFs) have volunteered for tours of duty in trouble spots like Timor Leste, Afghanistan and the Gulf of Aden.

    But no NSFs have served in Afghanistan as the missions there are riskier. Sailor Ken Goh, 21, leapt at the chance to be part of 'a real maritime operational mission' to fight piracy in the Gulf of Aden last year, becoming one of 279 men and women chasing pirates in the waters off Somalia between August and December. But national servicemen make up only a fraction of the thousands of SAF personnel who have been deployed overseas.

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    SAF's 41 YEARS IN OVERSEAS OPERATIONSSince its first overseas mission in East Pakistan (now known as Bangladesh) to help victims of a deadly cyclone in 1970
    , the SAF has been involved in more than 50 peace support or humanitarian relief missions. It is still making Singapore's presence felt by sending troops to help rebuild Afghanistan and fight piracy in the Gulf of Aden.

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    Default 10 young scientists receive NRF Fellowship

    Posted: 25 January 2012 1456 hrs


    SINGAPORE: Ten young scientists are the latest to receive the prestigious Singapore National Research Foundation Fellowship.

    They were picked among 120 applications and now join the ranks of 38 others, since the award was started in 2007.

    The aim of the Fellowship is to build a pool of young, brilliant and passionate researchers in various fields of science and technology to add to Singapore's research talent pool.

    The NRF Fellowship will provide each recipient with up to S$3 million in funding support over five years to perform cutting-edge research in Singapore.

    Dr Francis Yeoh, CEO of the National Research Foundation said: "The NRF Fellowship gives bright, young scientists a wonderful opportunity to prove themselves in research. We welcome the newly awarded NRF Fellows to become part of the vibrant research community here in Singapore, taking up appointments as assistant professors in our universities.

    "We expect many to become international scientific leaders in due course as well as role models to aspiring students who want to pursue careers in research."

    Newly awarded NRF Fellow Dr Chong Yidong, a Singaporean who is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University said: "Optics and photonics research in Singapore has become increasingly prominent over the past several years, with many extremely active research groups. I look forward to being a productive and engaged member of this growing research community."

    - CNA/cc

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    Default A*STAR technologies helping companies stay competitive

    By Imelda Saad | Posted: 25 January 2012 1115 hrs


    SINGAPORE: Companies in Singapore are benefitting from technologies created by research institutes under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR).

    One example is Reachfield IT Solutions, a local e-Solutions provider.

    The company has signed an agreement with Exploit Technologies, the commercialisation arm of A*STAR, to develop and market the Scalable Multimedia Platform (SMP) technology.

    The technology simplifies the current media transcoding process and benefits video hosting service providers.

    Most products now require the creation of multiple files to cater to a range of bandwidths and device resolutions.

    The SMP technology creates just a single 'layered' source file that can adapt automatically to the device and bandwidth of end users.

    This provides substantial savings in the reduction of storage space and minimises the man-hours needed for file transcoding.

    So for example, if you're a fan of Titanic and wished to view the movie on multiple platforms like the iPhone, on a computer or on a High Definition TV (HDTV), all you need to download is a single file.

    With just a one-time encoding process, the source file can be loaded and read anytime, anywhere and on any device.

    The technology was developed at the Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R).

    Mr Winson Wee, Reachfield's vice president of Client Engagement and Projects said, "With the licensing of SMP, we are now able to expand our core business with scalable video product and service offerings, and be empowered as a differentiated local SME company to stay ahead of our competitors by delivering innovative digital media solutions and cost savings for our customers."

    "Reachfield is a good example of how an SME can effectively make use of promising homegrown technology to grow their business. Local companies need specialised measures to ramp them up, and we have just that- a suite of services tailored just for SMEs to enhance their growth strategies. We encourage more of Singapore's 154,000 SMEs to come forward and work with A*STAR. There are plenty of other good sciences ready for more of you to springboard to greater heights," said Mr Philip Lim, CEO of Exploit Technologies.

    A*Star said the Institute for Infocomm Research will progressively expand the capabilities of SMP from video-on-demand into other applications such as live event-casting, live broadcasting and video surveillance.

    - CNA/cc

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