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    Default Receiving service (doubles)

    Hello there. I do stand nearer to the service line but sometimes I'm struggle a bit when the opponent uses a flick serve, it is either i am slow reacting to the flick serve, or maybe i am taking too big of a swing? it is quite difficult for me to return the shuttle with threat. can anyone give me advice on how to return flick serve effectively ? thank you!

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    you can do a number of things depending on what level you play. If your at a lower level where doubles play does not rely on specific doubles tactics, then a simple clear will give you and your partner time to recover.

    On the other hand if your playing more advanced badminton and need to stick to the "attack" goal of doubles, then its all about wrist. A quick snap can get a good angle and keep the shuttle flat and low from almost any position. My advice, download some cai yun and fu haifeng videos and search through until you find the flick serves. These 2 are simply the best at keeping the attack right from the word go. (in my opinion)

    Once you can comfortably get an attacking shot achieved from the flick serve you need to start concentrating on where your placing the shuttle. EG you need to see the spare space in the court and attack it. Most of the time there will be a slight opening near 1 of the lines. Find your space and a quick wrist smash shot into this area will give you good results.

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    From my own personal experience at medium level of play, if your opponent (server) flick serve you, smash straight back into the body of the server. As the server had just finished his flick serve, he would not have the focus to receive your smash in time. If you smash to his partner who is not serviing, he can easily receive you smash as he is all prepared for a smash.

    If your opponent serve low, whenever possible especially when the backcourt player is standing quite behind anticipating to execute a smash, hit the shuttle in between the server and the backcourt player (preferably to his backhand side), this will force your opponent to return the shuttle by either hitting it to the backcourt for you to smash (attack) or drop shot, which you or your partner can easiler tap over.

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    Hello there milkycarton (indeed your name suggest you're from the galaxy milkyway)..
    From your post, your main concern is "how to return flick serve effectively ?" and this difficulty also contributes to as you "stand nearer to the service line" .......well bro, this is my opinion and advice in regards with your situation:

    Firstly, don't underestimate the tactical advantage by standing nearer to the service line since it has a huge advantage from 2 point of view. Firstly, by standing nearer to the service line, you will have the opportunity in retrieving the low serve from your opponent in a faster paste and, if you're capable, you can within a split second, able to place the shuttle within a strategic area for your own advantage.....and by having positioning yourself there and your opponent knows that you are well prepared in receiving his/her low serve, the second advantage comes that is.... it create a mental stress to your opponent because he has no choice other than to do a lift serve (be it flick or not). By doing this you will have...again, a tactical advantage to do an attacking manouvere be it drop or semi/full smash. The question is how can you return that flick serve effectively so that it can be in return be your own advantage?

    1. Eye coordination
    Focus your mental strength and eye on the shuttle!. Ignore your opponent whatever face appearance and eye placement style as this can distract you.

    2. Good ready position
    Position your racket frame at the level or above your eyesight as this will increase your forearm reflexes to retrieve any type of lift serve. Your foot stand also should be in such a way if you are eagerly wanted to leap up and backward instantly. All of this is to increase your preparation in terms of reflexes and momentum to receive.

    3. You need to have the paste
    Eventhough you tend to stand near to the service line.....a flick serve from your opponent will become an advantage for you if you have a good paste to position youself backwards faster. This will position yourself ideally to hit the shuttle faster and accurately as an attack....and sincerely,there is no other way to improve your paste other than by improving your footwork.

    4. Strong wrist
    Together with the above approach, having a very strong wrist also will give you an even a greater advantage in making a flick serve into an attack as you will able to hit downwards the shuttle quicker and powerfull.

    5. Anticipate your opponent
    Read his forearm/wrist/finger placement style during serve if possible to anticipate a flick serve.

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    hi milky carton, after reading through the post. I realise that the one very important point that was not mentioned. That is u have got to strengthen your leg power. Why all the national players are standing at the serve line when receiving serve. It is because they have such a good footwork that allows them to push their body back and intercept the flick. Training up ur legs would enable you to push back fast enough so that u can intercept the flick half way through its flight. Dont depend too much on your wrist because without a proper position no matter how strong your wrist is its not going to work. IMPT: Dont try to hard when u are receiving the flick serve, u might hurt ur back. Be careful and take care. cheers

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    bradmyster: yea, thought about the wrist, could do with some power up !

    laivc: thanks for advice, already do so

    shooting stroke: any relevant footwork you can suggest? eg better to left with right or left foot first? since the starting position is left in front and right at the back

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    Quote Originally Posted by ::R:: View Post
    hi milky carton, after reading through the post. I realise that the one very important point that was not mentioned. That is u have got to strengthen your leg power. Why all the national players are standing at the serve line when receiving serve. It is because they have such a good footwork that allows them to push their body back and intercept the flick. Training up ur legs would enable you to push back fast enough so that u can intercept the flick half way through its flight. Dont depend too much on your wrist because without a proper position no matter how strong your wrist is its not going to work. IMPT: Dont try to hard when u are receiving the flick serve, u might hurt ur back. Be careful and take care. cheers
    thank you for the advice. well im quite young and willing to take challenges ^^.
    im playin intermediate level at the moment, often play against county players, I have only just started badminton a year ago but have had substantial results since a few months of training.

    have you got any recommendation for footwork training? thanks

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    okay, do u have a squash racket? if u dont go get one, its awesome. really helps alot, not only it helps your power but it also strengthen your legs. it can also show all the flaws of your stroke. there are a lot of things that i can do to help u with ur footwork but i tinks its quite difficult to do it here. if i have time i try to type out in a better format.

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    you mean play a normal game with a squash racket or just swing it with a squash racket?

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    okay, with the squash racket do footwork. 6 corners of the court if u have a training partner get him to point for u. also u can do drills with the squash racket. drills like smash drills or movement drills or multi-shuttle drills. smash drills mean u onli use half the court then u smash and move in to net and ur partner will lift for u to smash again and so on. this will help u strengthen up ur foot work and with alot of repetition u can power up ur legs too. so next time when ur opponent flicks u all u have to do is take one small step then jump up and smash.

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    So if you are standing near to the service line with racket at eye level and opposite foot to racket hand is forward, is the closest leg forward loose or tensed ready to spring either backwards or forwards? and is it all leg movement or also pushing off with the foot?

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    Predominant leg forward. Assume it'll be high. Expect it low.

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    it depends pretty much on the serve as well. if it is a flat flick then u jus need to jump up and smash it down. if its quite high then u have to take an additional small step. if u are right handed, ur left leg shld be up front and your right foot behind shld be bent jus lik a wound up spring ready to spring off. ur left leg provides the direction and ur right leg provides the push off power. the opposite goes for left handers. Important note: do look out for signs in ur opponent's movement that would give u hints that he is gna flick.

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    hmm shall be trying it out tmr. im sure i will be flicked serve hehe~ will post the results + questions later on

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    Quote Originally Posted by milkycarton View Post
    Hello there. I do stand nearer to the service line but sometimes I'm struggle a bit when the opponent uses a flick serve, it is either i am slow reacting to the flick serve, or maybe i am taking too big of a swing? it is quite difficult for me to return the shuttle with threat. can anyone give me advice on how to return flick serve effectively ? thank you!
    The stronger player the more front positioning.

    As you position upfront at the serve line, prepare for the flick serve always. On the other words, if you can prepare for the flick serve, you need to move up to the serve line.

    One tip for the preparation is (if you use right hand) to stand with your left foot a bit twisted so that the outer side of your left foot might be positioned parallel with the serve line. It will greatly help you to directly jump over to return the flick serve. Try it out to know what I'm talking about.

    In badminton, the secret always in the foot work and the preparations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by narnia View Post
    The stronger player the more front positioning.

    As you position upfront at the serve line, prepare for the flick serve always. On the other words, if you can prepare for the flick serve, you need to move up to the serve line.

    One tip for the preparation is (if you use right hand) to stand with your left foot a bit twisted so that the outer side of your left foot might be positioned parallel with the serve line. It will greatly help you to directly jump over to return the flick serve. Try it out to know what I'm talking about.

    In badminton, the secret always in the foot work and the preparations.
    yea, i see fu haifeng do that. looks painful, but still, gona give it a try in a few hours time hehe

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    tried it, not used to it yet, but i can see how you can benefit from it. anyway gona try again tmr

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