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    Default Park Joo Bong coaching forecourt: switch feet

    This random video came up on youtube.

    He is feeding shuttles....very fast!!

    I have forgotten the Japanese player's name.

    Anyway, look at the footwork when it switches at 0.45s. The right foot lunges across for the backhand and then switches back so the player is face on.

    Now look at the french player at 1.25s. Can you see after playing the backhand, he doesn't come on as square on to the net? Makes him feel uncomfortable playing the round the head.




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    The first French guy did have a pretty good backhand kill.
    But one sees your point that he might not be ready to move across the net as quickly as the Japanese player who followed him.

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    Thanks for this Cheung. It's clear that the French chap is much slower and probably would struggle more to get to one (or at least maintain attack) on the forehand side if the next one was fed to his "dead zone" as his feet aren't ready for that. But could it be that he already knows or is expecting the next one to his backhand and so doesn't change feet positions?

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    Good observation Cheung.

    You could think of it like this:

    The forehand action and posture has much better coverage, especially when the reply is slightly loose (which is what you expect following an attempted kill).

    The reason for playing a backhand is that the shuttle was too far away for a good forehand. But once you have played the backhand, you are now positioned in your backhand net corner and no longer need a backhand. You can cover the replies with a forehand, and by being square on you are also better able to move quickly sideways along the net to any forehand shuttles.

    I also though Park Joo Bong had an epic side-beard, until I realised it was a headset mic.
    Last edited by Gollum; 03-13-2015 at 06:47 AM.

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    Park Joo Bong is an exceptional coach.

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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    Thanks for this Cheung. It's clear that the French chap is much slower and probably would struggle more to get to one (or at least maintain attack) on the forehand side if the next one was fed to his "dead zone" as his feet aren't ready for that. But could it be that he already knows or is expecting the next one to his backhand and so doesn't change feet positions?
    he's at a sever disadvantage anticipating like that.

    With that footwork, the French player can effectively only cover his left hand court. Even with a good backhand shot, you still have to be ready for the next shot. Stay on a backhand stance and he would not effectively cover anything forehand. As you guys pointed out, with his foot positioning, he cannot move across the net.

    In a game, if he cannot move across the net, the opposition only have to cross court block and easily get a lift. At the level he is playing at, his opponents are well capable of doing that.

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    With PJB shouting like that just before the player hits, is he doing that on purpose to get them to time the split step or anything?

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    Not sure. Could be just his own style of teaching. Is it me or does the French player seem to back off the net a bit after playing the backhand compared to the Japanese player?

    I really like this video. It's quite uncommon to find a direct comparison of two players at this level.

    Park Joo Bong also emphasizes using a short racquet swing.

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    Yes, the French guys were slower and more tentative up front.

    This is where speed, quick reactions, and compact stroke is paramount. Here you can really see the difference between fast twitch vs slow twitch muscles...
    Last edited by visor; 03-13-2015 at 08:46 PM.

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    I don't think the difference is fast slow twitch - or rather, not so significant because it might be the technique differences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    With PJB shouting like that just before the player hits, is he doing that on purpose to get them to time the split step or anything?
    I think his shouting is linked to intensity. When he feeds faster he makes a louder noise - so I think its to help the player with their intensity - moving quick when necessary, and slower when the shuttle is slower.

    What I find really interesting about the comparing the japanese players with the first french player, is WHERE they are standing.

    As Cheung mentions, the French player tends to come forwards for the backhand, and then move slightly backwards ready for an intercept straight at the expense of the cross court shot (which COULD arguably be left for their partner if the shuttle is really wide). The Japanese players however hold their ground and simply turn on the spot. They do not back off at all - they simply get ready for the next shot!

    The MOST interesting thing I can see about this (other than the fact it has taught me how to play at the net! Thanks COACH!) is how far forwards the players are standing. Its hard to tell exactly how far forwards they are, but the japanese players are definitely closer to the net than the front service line and never go back behind the front service line. The french players on the other hand are both predominantly BEHIND the front service line, and rarely go in front of it. So this is probably a court positioning difference of about 1 foot. Which is very interesting. Imagine how much better the taller french players would be if they had the same agility, low stance, and forwards court positioning than the japanese players.

    Absolutely love this video!

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    -edited----
    Last edited by OhSearsTower; 03-14-2015 at 05:04 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhSearsTower View Post
    dont forget that the french guys are taller and therefore naturally in a disadvantage regarding speed and agility
    That's one thing I don't fully understand... taller players have longer reach and step, so they should be feared at the front/net.

    But then there are some fast agile tall pro players like Mogensen, Hong Wei, Ivanov who would own the net.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    That's one thing I don't fully understand... taller players have longer reach and step, so they should be feared at the front/net.

    But then there are some fast agile tall pro players like Mogensen, Hong Wei, Ivanov who would own the net.
    I agree. Whilst taller player are generally not as quick or agile, I believe that is because of their development rather than their capability. As they are young, they will not need to be as fast as shorter players because they can cover the court more easily. Thus, when they reach professional level, they can cover the court really well, but in a very different way to shorter players (who have had to develop exceptional leg speed in order to be able to cover the court at all).

    Therefore, I believe taller players should be capable of training to be that agile, but due to their height, have not developed those talents at a younger age.

    I wonder if the tall agile players were shorter as children e.g. regular height and hence developed agility, before having a sudden growth spurt which gave them height. This is highly unusual, normally taller men are taller from a young age.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I think his shouting is linked to intensity. When he feeds faster he makes a louder noise - so I think its to help the player with their intensity - moving quick when necessary, and slower when the shuttle is slower.
    Here comes one example/application of "yelling on court". I feel vindicated as PJB also does it!

    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    What I find really interesting about the comparing the japanese players with the first french player, is WHERE they are standing.

    As Cheung mentions, the French player tends to come forwards for the backhand, and then move slightly backwards ready for an intercept straight at the expense of the cross court shot (which COULD arguably be left for their partner if the shuttle is really wide). The Japanese players however hold their ground and simply turn on the spot. They do not back off at all - they simply get ready for the next shot!
    There might be a difference in style in addition to agility. Hard to say who these players are. As this is in Japan, and those "French" guys (how do we know they're French guys, other than the word "France" at their back), can't possibly be in the Japan National team, who really are they? So the bottom line is, are some of these Singles players, and some Doubles?

    The reaction of the French guy is what is taught here to the juniors by Doubles specialist. Once you hit a shot (esp. if it's a good shot), you immediately lean backward a little with racket up and ready for a straight reply, as this reply would be the fastest. In other word, you'd position yourself to attack the next most likely shot in a circumstance, and possibly sacrifice the other corner. Your partner would have to cover that. If the cross court shot is slower, certainly, he could pick it up too.

    For all the alleged speed of the Japanese, it is interesting (or questionable) how he'd cope had the return is a fast straight drive back toward him. So if there's a difference in performance, what we're talking about here is just a matter of trade-off.

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    From Matt's observation on the difference in how close they are away from the net, those Japanese who stand so close to the net, is that intentional? Is that even correct, as in some other threads here people had talked about how a player might place himself out of position by standing too close to the net. Note also the position of PJB, in how far he's away from his side of the net.

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    There is another difference - their heights.
    If getting racket up at head height would help better prepared for the next shot, then the French folks would be ready for the higher feeds at their normal heights, but not for the flatter/tighter feeds PJB gave them. They could be ready for those lower shots by bending backward a bit more.

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