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  1. #1
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    Default Erm... well its my own stupd fault

    So iīve been in Chile on a sort of holiday for 4 weeks now (no badminton sucks) going back tomorrow. We did some free climbing and i got stuck on a really steep wall with no hope of climbing off, so i jumped like ten meters onto sand. Only just landed the jump and thankfully no injuries. We went to this like abandoned town and i jumped off this 6 meter drop but this time i didnīt land it well
    i ripped my jeans and cut up my leg pretty bad. Iīve got a scab the size of... i dunno diameter is almost 3cm. its right on my knee so very difficult to live with. Went for a run this morning through santiago which was very nice except for the smog lol and it was fine but iīd like this to heal asap so i can be mroe flexible on the court.

    Long story short... how do you get a scab to heal faster, i know thereīs probably nothing but i thought iīd give here a try.

  2. #2
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    put a bandage or plaster on it for few days. A scab forms due to the oxygen from the air so the best way for it to heal quicker is to cover it up

    Hope this helps


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gingerphil79 View Post
    put a bandage or plaster on it for few days. A scab forms due to the oxygen from the air so the best way for it to heal quicker is to cover it up
    I don't think that's accurate.

    Scabs form naturally from blood clotting, which occurs even without the presence of oxygen (for example, a blood clot can form in the brain following haemorrhage). A scab is a tough, dried-out layer of platelets and fibrin that serves two main functions:

    • Stops you from bleeding to death.
    • Protects the wound, allowing it to heal undisturbed.


    Wounds will dry out better if left open to the air, allowing scabs to form more effectively. Once a scab has formed, avoid disturbing it: don't pick at it, and let it dry out after getting wet (showers, baths, swimming...).

    However, wounds must also be kept clean and protected. If a scab is likely to be bashed, consider covering it up with a padded dressing to protect it from being ripped open. Make sure the part of the dressing touching the wound is non-adherent, or it will stick to any exudate (such as pus). Check the dressing regularly and replace it if it becomes dirty on the inside (from blood, pus, sweat, or anything else).
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-11-2009 at 12:13 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    I don't think that's accurate.

    Scabs form naturally from blood clotting, which occurs even without the presence of oxygen (for example, a blood clot can form in the brain following haemorrhage). A scab is a tough, dried-out layer of platelets and fibrin that serves two main functions:
    • Stops you from bleeding to death.
    • Protects the wound, allowing it to heal undisturbed.

    Wounds will dry out better if left open to the air, allowing scabs to form more effectively. Once a scab has formed, avoid disturbing it: don't pick at it, and let it dry out after getting wet (showers, baths, swimming...).

    However, wounds must also be kept clean and protected. If a scab is likely to be bashed, consider covering it up with a padded dressing to protect it from being ripped open. Make sure the part of the dressing touching the wound is non-adherent, or it will stick to any exudate (such as pus). Check the dressing regularly and replace it if it becomes dirty on the inside (from blood, pus, sweat, or anything else).

    i acutally beleive it is better to put a bandade on top. THe bandade (with the help of polysporin) will help keep the moisture on the wound. I heard it is good to have moisture because when it is moist it will heal faster.

    I have tried it and it heals pretty fast this way and no infections haha =P

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    I don't think that's accurate.

    Scabs form naturally from blood clotting, which occurs even without the presence of oxygen (for example, a blood clot can form in the brain following haemorrhage). A scab is a tough, dried-out layer of platelets and fibrin that serves two main functions:
    • Stops you from bleeding to death.
    • Protects the wound, allowing it to heal undisturbed.

    Wounds will dry out better if left open to the air, allowing scabs to form more effectively. Once a scab has formed, avoid disturbing it: don't pick at it, and let it dry out after getting wet (showers, baths, swimming...).

    However, wounds must also be kept clean and protected. If a scab is likely to be bashed, consider covering it up with a padded dressing to protect it from being ripped open. Make sure the part of the dressing touching the wound is non-adherent, or it will stick to any exudate (such as pus). Check the dressing regularly and replace it if it becomes dirty on the inside (from blood, pus, sweat, or anything else).
    Ok fair enough my explanation mite not be accurate but I do know for a fact that it will heal quicker if a bandage is put on it for a few days. I have tried and tested this theory myself.

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    You may well be right about the wound healing faster if it's kept moist. The downside is that it's more vulnerable (on an expedition, I'm pleased to see a tough, thick scab. In any other setting, minor wounds don't matter ).

    In any case, once the scab has formed, you no longer have the choice.

    I would avoid antibacterial plasters or ointments, as these are cytotoxic: as well as destroying bacteria, they kill off some of your own cells. Antiseptics should be avoided for the same reason, unless the wound seems prone to infection.

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    Cheers guys, so you know i left the scab to form and didn't disturb it (apart from showers). The area the scab covers is now much less than before, around it is nice fresh VERY pink skin. Flexability is almost full as well, although i don't want to risk a full stretch. I've tried to keep my diet good with a bit more protein just in case that helped.

    I used a melonin dressing at first (when i was still in a foriegn country) to avoid infection and to reduce friction between clothes. The pain of ripping out my hairs and the fuss and expense were too much once i was back in the UK to bother with protecting it, shorts for the win.

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