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    Default how is the doubles rotation formation like?

    hi,i've been playing badminton leisurely for around 5 years (had some basic training before),so i'm pretty much an intermediate player..i'm lean,male,21,5' 7",and have an average strength level.

    i'm currently a doubles player,n i'm very interested in knowing how to use the doubles rotation formation..me n my partner both have footwork,but at times during attacking,our recovery period after a smash is still not too satisfying.if our opponent manages to lift one of our smashes to the other direction,the back player has to struggle to return it.one way to maintain attack is to work on our backcourt footwork (side to side stepping),or we can go for a rotation formation.since rotating switches the attacking player,this allows both players to take turns attacking (reduces fatigue).so we've decided to take this step while we slowly work on our footwork

    anyway,what is the sequence of the rotation?and are there only specific scenarios that uses this method?

    thx in advance!

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    One piece of advice I can give is to watch these youtube videos by Lee Jae Bok, I think it should help with what you are looking for:

    Doubles attacking system:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM...x=0&playnext=1

    Helping forecourt player:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQBNu...rom=PL&index=2

    And the one you're most interested in, helping rear court player:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk_Bv...rom=PL&index=1


    If people are putting your smash anywhere you might also want to try making it steeper, so the angle isn't there to put it across court. Try a bit less power but steeper, then move in slightly, gradually your opponent won't be able to return. This is assuming the smash is good, if not back off slightly to cover the return cross court.

    Hope that helps.

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    thanks! that's exactly what i was looking for.the third video explained evrything..though we kinda guessed that method a few weeks back when we brainstormed for ideas.since it confirmed the method,i think we'll just stick to it.

    but this positioning isn't really rotational is it? are there other formations that involve circling the court? coz i've read somewhere before that states doubles rotation as 'a rotation formation,used by experts,in a counterclockwise direction,eliminating the use of backhand' or something like that.

    and about steeping up the smashes,do i sharpen the angle or do i aim it straighter (like a powerful drive)? coz from my experience,head shots are more difficult to counter bcoz theres less room to swing (probably bcoz asians are generally shorter,so low drives are considered head shots haha).

    thx again for the feedback, it was very enlightening!

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    Maybe you could watch more women doubles on Youtube because that's where all the doubles formation can be seen. Men doubles is just too fast and flashy, and also seldom includes shots that recreational players use often (such as clears).

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    Quote Originally Posted by ianboy View Post
    and about steeping up the smashes,do i sharpen the angle or do i aim it straighter (like a powerful drive)? coz from my experience,head shots are more difficult to counter bcoz theres less room to swing (probably bcoz asians are generally shorter,so low drives are considered head shots haha).
    From my experience, flat smashes (aimed toward my head) are easier to counter because I can drive it back. I don't need a big swing from the racket because the force of the smash is enough to bounce it back very fast. To each his own.

    A steeper smash gives a lower option of return. It is harder to convert into an offensive shot. But let's not underestimate flat smashes because it's also a form of variety.

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    I'm not sure if this is exactly what you mean by rotation but this is partly what I was coached a while back. The rear court player moves forward if a player hits a poor lift, rear court player smashes well and anticipates a weak return. As the rear court player has forward momentum they move forward to cover the net and any possible returns.

    The front court player moves backwards, to the non racket side (or anticlockwise) of the rear court player moving forwards, this then eliminates the moving forward player having to play any backhand shots, they will be on the retreating players forehand. As the rear court players smash was good a deep defensive lift to the back is unlikely so the front player has time to get back and attack any weaker lifts. This can continue until the point is won.

    I'd be careful of over rotating though, if the opposing team manages to off balance the back player (through a good, deep defensive lift) then you could end up in a situation seen in the Lee Jae Bok coaching videos. If you the rear court player is off balance, or still moving backwards stay back, there's no point throwing yourself forward, off balance, let the fore court player help.

    It's good you have a permanent double partner to practise this with, you will get to know what your partner does over time and then gain a sixth sense of what they will do, making rotation and the things in the coaching videos easier to do. I wish I did, moving areas a lot over the past few months means I can't practise this

    One last point, I am not a coach, if anyone who is knows I have gotten something horribly wrong, please correct it!

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    Default Training exercises

    And now for a few coaching exercises to practise this (sorry for double post, it's clearer this way). Please keep in mind I cannot entirely remember these properly, I'm not sure on the first exercise whether you should rotate in different directions on opposite sides of the court. Or if you should rotate in the opposite direction if both player are left handed.

    You will need someone to feed you shuttles, or use the opposing doubles pair and have two feeders to keep up the speed of the feed if they're not good at feeding. You can then do the same for them.

    To get use to rotating around your partner:

    Use only half the court, this is net shots and kills only.
    The feeder should play shots to the net, keep things simple at first, higher shots that are slow. This helps the rotating players get a feel for it. Once they improve vary things up, tighter shots, varying speed etc. Don't let the shuttle go too far past the net though.

    The attacking players: The front court player should play the shot (net shot drive, kill) and then rotate anti-clockwise (to the left of the rear court player). The rear court player should then move forwards to the place the front court player was and attack the next shuttle. Repeat this until the feeder(s) run out of shuttles or the attacking players can no longer stand!

    Then repeat for the other side of the court and for the feeders (you don't want them doing no work do you!)

    Half court rotation:
    The job of the feeder(s) is to now vary the placement of the shuttle, if you can feed one shuttle and then defend against any oncoming smashes/net kills net shots. This makes the return shot more realistic, if you can attack their smash/drive the shuttle into them, or lift it deep, do so. It will help the player to get an idea of when to rotate and when not to. Remember to mix the shots up, from net play to lifts. Again don't start too aggressively, let the attackers get used to rotating first.

    The attackers should not rotate whenever. If the front court player attacks at the net they stay there ready for the next shot. If the rear court player has to clear (you would go sides in a full court, this isn't practical in a half court so stay where you are). If the rear court player plays a drop shot then everything stays as it is, the front court player prepares to attack at the net the rear court player gets ready for a lift.

    It's when the rear court player smashes that things get more interesting. First make sure the smash is strong, if it is then the rear court player should move forwards slightly, hopefully the return shot is weaker so the rear court player smashes again (or the front court player kills if it goes to the net). However as you move forward you will notice you're encroaching on the front players area. When this happens you should switch places (front court player goes to the left of rear court player), the new front player continues to attack (hopefully) while the new rear court tries to finish off any weak lifts.

    Continue until exhausted or the feeder runs out of shuttles. This is also a good way of improving the feeder(s) defence. Just remember, if you have 2 feeders it will be easier to have one person sit off if you are defending, not just feeding.

    The full court:
    Pretty much see the Lee Jae Bok videos.
    Feeders: This time there is a need for two feeders ideally (you can do it with one, it just becomes harder for the one feeder to defend shots back). The feeder should at first focus on feeding the shuttles to the middle area of the court, about a half court width, just to get the attackers used to a full court. Gradually widen the area of your feeding/defending if you can manage it to include the whole court. Again if they play a weak smash then try to attack it, although this isn't the main aim. The feeder/defender should keep thing simple at first, before becoming slightly more awkward as the attackers get the hang of it.

    The attackers should be in the formation described in the Lee Jae Bok videos. If something goes wrong with your attack see helping rear court/fore court players. If it works however then be prepared to rotate as in the half court game to keep up a sustained attack. The net player should try and cut out any shots that could become awkward for the rear court player (if it's going towards their backhand for example).


    I hope that helps anyone, sorry for the length, it's easier to explain in video but that's not an option at the moment. I'd be impressed if anyone manages to get the hang of it straight away! I certainly haven't!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sevex View Post
    One piece of advice I can give is to watch these youtube videos by Lee Jae Bok, I think it should help with what you are looking for:

    Doubles attacking system:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM...x=0&playnext=1

    Helping forecourt player:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQBNu...rom=PL&index=2

    And the one you're most interested in, helping rear court player:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk_Bv...rom=PL&index=1


    If people are putting your smash anywhere you might also want to try making it steeper, so the angle isn't there to put it across court. Try a bit less power but steeper, then move in slightly, gradually your opponent won't be able to return. This is assuming the smash is good, if not back off slightly to cover the return cross court.

    Hope that helps.
    WOW.... i learned so much. thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by venkatesh View Post
    From my experience, flat smashes (aimed toward my head) are easier to counter because I can drive it back. I don't need a big swing from the racket because the force of the smash is enough to bounce it back very fast. To each his own.

    A steeper smash gives a lower option of return. It is harder to convert into an offensive shot. But let's not underestimate flat smashes because it's also a form of variety.
    Steep smash gives lower option of returns and also more time to reply any returns because the return will be going up... even at the net. So front player should be alert and aggressive to make the kill and the back player must be ready to take everything else from midcourt to baseline.

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    Sevex gave some pretty good drills for rotation. I know of one where you get a doubles going but both side start in offensive formation. Each player can only play two shots before rotating out or get out of the way so his partner can come in and play his two shots: only the front player gets to hit. This basically forces both players to cover for one another. There's no smash, kills or net shot and everybody should try to keep the rally going as long as possible. The point is to not to kill the rally but rather to keep hitting and moving in rotation whatever way for the other player to play his two shots. It gets pretty fun once you get the hang of it. This drill not only improves your mobility, stance recovery and push/drive strokes but also make you aware of your partner's position. Lots of players usually stop and hit but this drill forces you to hit while moving.

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