User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 18 to 23 of 23
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,937
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danstevens View Post
    ...for smash returns, I think it's good practise to keep the racket a little higher than you suggest. About head height and out in front of you. This encourages you to take the shuttle early and makes it easier to punish any bad smashes you might get.
    That's generally a bad idea, although it does work well in specific circumstances.

    You should train your smash defence to cope with powerful, steep smashes. If your racket is up near head height, you have no chance of returning these.

    If your opponent constantly smashes flat, then by all means bring your racket up to head height (this is "crouch defence"), and improve your counter-attack.

    Generally, however, it's better to be ready for the steeper smashes. If a flat smash comes, you still have time to switch into crouch defence (flat smashes are necessarily slower smashes, or they will go out the back).
    Last edited by Gollum; 11-20-2009 at 03:48 AM.

  2. #19
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    4,211
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    There is the added issue that if your racket head is too high you will be blocking smashes that are going to go long.

    Lee Jae Bok, in one of his online coaching videos, suggests having the racket head no higher than chest height; if something comes in higher than this you can leave it to go long. Of course, if the opponent can get some mental angles, or is very close to the net, this doesn't always work...

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Edmonton, AB
    Posts
    1,534
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I try to keep my racket at waist level with a slight downward angle and unless I'm playing very hard smashers I like to keep my elbow in close to my side to allow for a forehand shot if needed.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    vancouver
    Posts
    212
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    a good tip i was taught was to have the BASE of your thumb firmly on the grip as well, not just the tip of the thumb touching,(so your entire thumb is flush against the grip) makes your shot more solid, the smash wont rattle your racket, and you can reply with ease.

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Ameria
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vorxaw View Post
    a good tip i was taught was to have the BASE of your thumb firmly on the grip as well, not just the tip of the thumb touching,(so your entire thumb is flush against the grip) makes your shot more solid, the smash wont rattle your racket, and you can reply with ease.
    Bad idea. If your whole thumb is on the racket you won't be able to push with it, use grip tightening, or apply the additional rotation power that it can provide.

    My smash defense is simply the basic grip which allow me to use all the methods I listed above as well as covering the forehand and left hand. I hold the racket low in front on me, but usually a bit toward the forehand side.

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Aus, Vic, Melbourne
    Posts
    152
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danstevens View Post
    Sound advise, as always from Brad. You shouldn't really be making much of a swing with your arm, just a firm flick of the wrist coupled with a small arm movement should be enough.



    I disagree somewhat with your emboldened statement. Doubles is all about getting on the attack; generally, if you're attacking, you have a strong chance of winning the rally. Therefore, for smash returns, I think it's good practise to keep the racket a little higher than you suggest. About head height and out in front of you. This encourages you to take the shuttle early and makes it easier to punish any bad smashes you might get. As an added benefit, keeping the racket around that sort of height protects your face from any incoming smashes to that area.
    Not sure if you learnt doubles footwork. Offensive Position ie: You are performing drop shot, smash, net, or short serve you and your partner stand front and back

    Whereas in defence ie: clear, lift you stand side by side to take smashes or drop shots from the opponent.

    Not that i'm saying YOU HAVE to have your racquet below your waist to return smash normally a strong player's smash is very sharp not flat if it is flat smash then take advantage.

    Quote: You shouldn't really be making much of a swing with your arm, just a firm flick of the wrist coupled with a small arm movement should be enough.

    If you take smash you should have some sort of arm movement so that when you strike the shuttle your arm will move so that the shuttle will be high above and land on the opponent's baseline.
    Flick is more like in singles whereas your opponent smash you on the side of the court you slightly flick your wrist so that the shuttle can just nick over the net.

    Note: I'm not sure if i explained very well because doubles and singles method of returning smash are totally different

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Backhand clear from rear court to opponents rear court
    By michael_khong in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 5
    : 08-12-2007, 01:56 PM
  2. Commenting on opponents?
    By raptorman in forum General Forum
    Replies: 13
    : 05-21-2005, 10:50 AM
  3. steep smashes vs flatter smashes
    By checkthemc in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 5
    : 05-11-2005, 10:03 PM
  4. Taunting opponents?
    By Somboa in forum General Forum
    Replies: 6
    : 04-17-2005, 04:59 AM
  5. Analysing Your Opponents
    By mongoose in forum Jonas Rasmussen Forum
    Replies: 3
    : 09-13-2003, 09:52 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •