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  1. #18
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    Thats partialy true.
    In this case there are 2 kinds of acurracy.
    The technical kinda and mentally kind.
    Technically if string tension is higher it will make the birde fly over to the direction the racket head is facing more accurate.
    Then mentally its all in stroke, grip, and mind. i don't think string tension has anything to do with that tho haha.
    just a thought.

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    I personally feel more accuracy with higher tension assuming that you can play comfortably at that higher tension. Why? Because the margin of error, such as when you play a netshot aiming for a tumblespin is narrower due to the tighter and less bouncier string. It's much like computer gamers choosing to go for very low mouse sensitivity and need more movement for a cursor movement on screen (like you need more power for a tighter string at higher tension). If you play games like Counterstrike during your younger days, you will know what I mean.

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    Here we go again. Once tension gets mentioned it confuses everyone!

    There is a lot of correct information in this thread so let's get the facts straight.

    1) higher tension reduces the sweet spot in the string bed.
    2) higher tensions increase the potential to break strings through mishits.
    3) higher tension = greater control but not necessarily greater power.
    4) you need excellent technique to get the best out of higher tension as your consistency in hitting means you rarely miss the sweet spot
    5) lower tension gives better string repulsion and therefore the strings work harder to give you power
    6) lower standard players are recommended to use lower tensions because the sweet spot is bigger and they therefore can develop their technique safely.
    7) higher tensions have been the cause of many players developing tennis elbow or shoulder injuries. These can be long term injuries and that is why it's safer to begin with lower tension until your technique is better.
    8) Many racket companies recommend lower tension 24lbs in their rackets to avoid frame breakage. Sponsored players exceed these tensions but there again, they usually don't have to pay for replacement rackets. Exceeding recommended tension will invalidate your racket warranty.

    OK, facts over. Hope this helps. I know many players find higher tensions work for them. So are right and some do it for their ego only.

    Paul
    www.badminton-coach.co.uk

  4. #21
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    any ideas As to how to train your wrist and machines or devieces I can purchase ? Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by LD rules! View Post
    any ideas As to how to train your wrist and machines or devieces I can purchase ? Thanks
    courtesy of BC's very own Mr. Paul Stewart

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLlYpja1nRo

    very simple but useful lesson.

    cheers!

  6. #23
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    Lower tensions were used in the old days because the racquet frames then were mainly made of wood or aluminum, which besides not being able to be strung to high tensions without warping also did not have high enough youngs modulus to take advantage of very high tensions.
    In a way low tensions are a carry-over from the old days. Low tensions depend more on the resilience or stretching/compression of the stringbed to send the bird on its way.
    Today's carbon graphite racquets, which can range from low youngs modulus to ultra high modulus graphite, are very much stiffer than the old wooden or aluminum racquets. Unlike the old racquets whose frame will vibrate when hit at very high tensions due to the less rigid materials used, resulting in significant loss of energy, today's racquets of especially the very stiff ones like the Li Ning N series are best used at very high tensions. With very high tensions on frames that are super stiff-stiff as in youngs modulus-the stringbed at very high tensions and the racquet becomes a more lethal weapon because of its "oneness" instead of two separate pieces of frame + stringbed of the old days where the frame makes almost no contribution to power and high speed shots that we see today.
    This means that if you have very stiff or high youngs modulus racquets, then use high tensions to access their full potential. Of course they can be used at low tensions but this is not what very stiff or high modulus racquets are designed for.

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    Higher tension generates more power if you're strong. Gollum correctly stated that if you were to start with a low tension and gradually move up, you'll find you generate more power up to a certain point. At that point, if you increase the tension more, you lose power.

    String tension works on a similar principle to shaft flexibility. Your string-bed is like a trampoline, pure and simple. When the shuttle makes contact with the string-bed, it bends the strings back. The strings then snap back into place, which propels the shuttle forwards. Like I said, exactly like a trampoline: you land on the trampoline, you bend the surface down, and then it springs you back up in order to regain its original shape.

    So let's say you start off at a neutral tension. We'll say 23 lbs. At the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing bends the strings back, let's say 2 cm. The strings then snap back into place and propels the bird forwards. So we'll use that as a standard.

    Then you increase your tension to say, 26 lbs. IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm. Except now, because the tension is higher, the strings snap back into their original position at a faster speed and thus, increases the repulsion. Lo and behold, all the increased speed and repulsion translates to a more powerful smash.

    Wonderful. This increasing tension thing seems to be working. So now you decide to increase the tension to 30 lbs. Theoretically, it should work the same way. The higher tension should snap the strings back at an even faster speed and generate even more repulsion right? Well, that depends on your ability TO BEND THE STRINGS BACK 2 CM. If you are strong enough to bend the strings back 2 cm, then yes, you will create more power. However, if the tension has gotten so high that you can't even generate enough power to bend the strings back 2 cm, then the strings will only bend, say 1 cm (or less). In THIS scenario, then, yes, the strings will still snap back at a faster speed... but they're only snapping the distance of 1 cm, not 2. When that happens, you lose power (and you'll feel like you're hitting the shuttle with a wooden board).

    So you want to aim for an optimum balance right? You want to increase your tension as high as you can (for the increase in repulsion) WITHOUT compromising your ability to bend the strings. That's why professionals use super high tensions. THEY have the strength to bend the strings, even at comically high tensions. As a result, they reap the reward that is a more powerful and explosive smash. But if you don't have the strength to bend the strings, then you won't be able to reap the benefits of those same high tensions.
    Last edited by wristworks; 01-06-2010 at 06:46 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post

    So let's say you start off at a neutral tension. We'll say 23 lbs. At the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing bends the strings back, let's say 2 cm. The strings then snap back into place and propels the bird forwards. So we'll use that as a standard.

    Then you increase your tension to say, 26 lbs. IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm. Except now, because the tension is higher, the strings snap back into their original position at a faster speed and thus, increases the repulsion. Lo and behold, all the increased speed and repulsion translates to a more powerful smash.

    Wonderful. This increasing tension thing seems to be working. So now you decide to increase the tension to 30 lbs. Theoretically, it should work the same way. The higher tension should snap the strings back at an even faster speed and generate even more repulsion right? Well, that depends on your ability TO BEND THE STRINGS BACK 2 CM. If you are strong enough to bend the strings back 2 cm, then yes, you will create more power. However, if the tension has gotten so high that you can't even generate enough power to bend the strings back 2 cm, then the strings will only bend, say 1 cm (or less). In THIS scenario, then, yes, the strings will still snap back at a faster speed... but they're only snapping the distance of 1 cm, not 2. When that happens, you lose power (and you'll feel like you're hitting the shuttle with a wooden board).
    the physics explained in a simple manner---i think you nailed it

  9. #26
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    Thumbs up Excellence explaination.

    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    Higher tension generates more power if you're strong. Gollum correctly stated that if you were to start with a low tension and gradually move up, you'll find you generate more power up to a certain point. At that point, if you increase the tension more, you lose power.

    String tension works on a similar principle to shaft flexibility. Your string-bed is like a trampoline, pure and simple. When the shuttle makes contact with the string-bed, it bends the strings back. The strings then snap back into place, which propels the shuttle forwards. Like I said, exactly like a trampoline: you land on the trampoline, you bend the surface down, and then it springs you back up in order to regain its original shape.

    So let's say you start off at a neutral tension. We'll say 23 lbs. At the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing bends the strings back, let's say 2 cm. The strings then snap back into place and propels the bird forwards. So we'll use that as a standard.

    Then you increase your tension to say, 26 lbs. IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm. Except now, because the tension is higher, the strings snap back into their original position at a faster speed and thus, increases the repulsion. Lo and behold, all the increased speed and repulsion translates to a more powerful smash.

    Wonderful. This increasing tension thing seems to be working. So now you decide to increase the tension to 30 lbs. Theoretically, it should work the same way. The higher tension should snap the strings back at an even faster speed and generate even more repulsion right? Well, that depends on your ability TO BEND THE STRINGS BACK 2 CM. If you are strong enough to bend the strings back 2 cm, then yes, you will create more power. However, if the tension has gotten so high that you can't even generate enough power to bend the strings back 2 cm, then the strings will only bend, say 1 cm (or less). In THIS scenario, then, yes, the strings will still snap back at a faster speed... but they're only snapping the distance of 1 cm, not 2. When that happens, you lose power (and you'll feel like you're hitting the shuttle with a wooden board).

    So you want to aim for an optimum balance right? You want to increase your tension as high as you can (for the increase in repulsion) WITHOUT compromising your ability to bend the strings. That's why professionals use super high tensions. THEY have the strength to bend the strings, even at comically high tensions. As a result, they reap the reward that is a more powerful and explosive smash. But if you don't have the strength to bend the strings, then you won't be able to reap the benefits of those same high tensions.
    My stringer allow to increase the tension by .5 lbs, so I am happy with 25.5lbs now.

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    Higher tension generates more power if you're strong. Gollum correctly stated that if you were to start with a low tension and gradually move up, you'll find you generate more power up to a certain point. At that point, if you increase the tension more, you lose power.

    String tension works on a similar principle to shaft flexibility. Your string-bed is like a trampoline, pure and simple. When the shuttle makes contact with the string-bed, it bends the strings back. The strings then snap back into place, which propels the shuttle forwards. Like I said, exactly like a trampoline: you land on the trampoline, you bend the surface down, and then it springs you back up in order to regain its original shape.

    So let's say you start off at a neutral tension. We'll say 23 lbs. At the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing bends the strings back, let's say 2 cm. The strings then snap back into place and propels the bird forwards. So we'll use that as a standard.

    Then you increase your tension to say, 26 lbs. IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm. Except now, because the tension is higher, the strings snap back into their original position at a faster speed and thus, increases the repulsion. Lo and behold, all the increased speed and repulsion translates to a more powerful smash.

    Wonderful. This increasing tension thing seems to be working. So now you decide to increase the tension to 30 lbs. Theoretically, it should work the same way. The higher tension should snap the strings back at an even faster speed and generate even more repulsion right? Well, that depends on your ability TO BEND THE STRINGS BACK 2 CM. If you are strong enough to bend the strings back 2 cm, then yes, you will create more power. However, if the tension has gotten so high that you can't even generate enough power to bend the strings back 2 cm, then the strings will only bend, say 1 cm (or less). In THIS scenario, then, yes, the strings will still snap back at a faster speed... but they're only snapping the distance of 1 cm, not 2. When that happens, you lose power (and you'll feel like you're hitting the shuttle with a wooden board).

    So you want to aim for an optimum balance right? You want to increase your tension as high as you can (for the increase in repulsion) WITHOUT compromising your ability to bend the strings. That's why professionals use super high tensions. THEY have the strength to bend the strings, even at comically high tensions. As a result, they reap the reward that is a more powerful and explosive smash. But if you don't have the strength to bend the strings, then you won't be able to reap the benefits of those same high tensions.
    This is one of the best explanation on the string tension on this forum , someone should make it a sticky !

  11. #28
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    You miss an important point in this explanation, which debunks the myth that higher tension gives you more power.

    Physically, there is no way correlation between string tension and the velocity that a badminton bird (or any object) leaves the racquet with the tension of the strings because energy must be conserved. A high string tension does not more waste energy to be created in the transfer of energy from the "swing" (input energy).
    However, you are correct in what you said because you specified that MORE input energy will be given in a higher tension racquet:
    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm.
    Basically, i think you mislead a lot of people reading this because you didn't point out that it is not the string which is causing more power to in imparted, but you yourself. If you swing at the same speed or "power", you will NOT be able to bend the string back 2 cm like you were able to with the lower tension racquet and the resultant velocity will be the same. Your increased STRENGTH (to quote your own post) and the resultant increased SPEED of your swing causes the increased MOMENTUM of your racquet which causes the increased resultant velocity of the shuttleock.

    The laws of physics must be observed!

    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    Higher tension generates more power if you're strong. Gollum correctly stated that if you were to start with a low tension and gradually move up, you'll find you generate more power up to a certain point. At that point, if you increase the tension more, you lose power.

    String tension works on a similar principle to shaft flexibility. Your string-bed is like a trampoline, pure and simple. When the shuttle makes contact with the string-bed, it bends the strings back. The strings then snap back into place, which propels the shuttle forwards. Like I said, exactly like a trampoline: you land on the trampoline, you bend the surface down, and then it springs you back up in order to regain its original shape.

    So let's say you start off at a neutral tension. We'll say 23 lbs. At the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing bends the strings back, let's say 2 cm. The strings then snap back into place and propels the bird forwards. So we'll use that as a standard.

    Then you increase your tension to say, 26 lbs. IF YOU ARE STRONG, then at the moment that you contact the bird, the force of your swing will still be able to bend the strings back 2 cm. Except now, because the tension is higher, the strings snap back into their original position at a faster speed and thus, increases the repulsion. Lo and behold, all the increased speed and repulsion translates to a more powerful smash.

    Wonderful. This increasing tension thing seems to be working. So now you decide to increase the tension to 30 lbs. Theoretically, it should work the same way. The higher tension should snap the strings back at an even faster speed and generate even more repulsion right? Well, that depends on your ability TO BEND THE STRINGS BACK 2 CM. If you are strong enough to bend the strings back 2 cm, then yes, you will create more power. However, if the tension has gotten so high that you can't even generate enough power to bend the strings back 2 cm, then the strings will only bend, say 1 cm (or less). In THIS scenario, then, yes, the strings will still snap back at a faster speed... but they're only snapping the distance of 1 cm, not 2. When that happens, you lose power (and you'll feel like you're hitting the shuttle with a wooden board).

    So you want to aim for an optimum balance right? You want to increase your tension as high as you can (for the increase in repulsion) WITHOUT compromising your ability to bend the strings. That's why professionals use super high tensions. THEY have the strength to bend the strings, even at comically high tensions. As a result, they reap the reward that is a more powerful and explosive smash. But if you don't have the strength to bend the strings, then you won't be able to reap the benefits of those same high tensions.

  12. #29
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    The premise of high string tension + high racket speed to give big smash speed is too simplistic. It's somewhat true but in large part, not necessarily true. Big smashes aren't necessarily dependent on high tension string bed. People who use the tennis racket principle to say low tension string would yield more power(speed) from trampoline effect is also somewhat correct but in large part, not necessarily correct. The key driver to high shuttle speed generation is so simple, it is how fast u swing your racket using good old fashion muscle power + proper stroke technique. Making improvement on your racket speed is another topic and it's up to u and your coach to work on. However, i can give u real examples to support my claim. A BC member, Vining W., can launch shuttle bombs with a racket string tension of 17-19 lbs. Clearly his string bed isn't trampolining the shuttle out with rocket speed, it's his racket doing the job mostly, the string is there just to hold onto the shuttle. On the other extreme, Fu Haifung and TBH hold the top smashing speed record (i quoted these two players as fastest shuttle speed were tested under 2 different condition). I believe their racket string tension aren't the highest, right? I'm sure there are top pros out there that use higher tension than Fu HF and TBH but yet can not top current smash speed record holders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler View Post
    People who use the tennis racket principle to say low tension string would yield more power(speed) from trampoline effect is also somewhat correct (wrong.) but in large part, not necessarily correct.
    This has been scientifically disproved (i can link you to the journal where they did the experiment if you really want, unfortunately no such test has been done for a badminton racquet and shuttlecock). With all other variables the same (swing speed, point of impact, angle etc), the string tension does not affect the speed of the tennis ball.

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    I said right from the get go that high string tension only increases power if you're strong so I don't know where all this misleading comes from. In fact, throughout the entire post, I made it a point to say that you have to be strong in order to properly utilize higher string tensions.

    What I am doing is illustrating the difference between having a low string tension vs. having a high string tension. As I said, if you are NOT strong, none of this will matter because you will only ever get power from a low tension. But I posit the assumption that, say you are a strong player. So let's say I'm a world class player. I'm pretty much as strong as you can get for a badminton player. Is there a difference in power between playing with a 19 lbs string tension vs. a 27 lbs string tension? Of course. Because your input will always remain constant: everyone smashes as hard as they can, regardless of string tension... you don't decide to "decrease" the amount of strength you put into your smash just because you have lower tension strings.

    So everyone's input will be relatively consistent, i.e. I will always use as much strength as I can when I smash, regardless of whether my tension is 19 or 27. So, as I said, let's assume I am a world class player. My input will always be consistently very high. With that consistent input, a racquet strung at 27 lbs will give me more power than a racquet strung at 19 lbs because 27 lbs will release energy FASTER after it's been loaded with potential energy. Sure, you can load the exact same amount of energy onto a racquet strung at 19 lbs. But because the tension is so much lower, the amount of time it takes for that potential energy to be released as kinetic energy is longer. As it stands, that increase in time already means that more energy is wasted. Furthermore, because the racquet is moving at such a fast speed, a lower tension means that the strings might not even be finished snapping before the shuttle leaves your racquet.

    If you want to really technical, the Conservation of Linear Momentum actually proves my point further. Momentum is retained in collisions, but KINETIC energy isn't. The more rigid two objects are, the more kinetic energy is retained (i.e. billiard balls and Newton's Cradle). If you had a case where 2 objects were perfectly rigid (only theoretically possible), then you would retain 100% of the kinetic energy. However, as the objects lose their rigidity, kinetic energy gets diffused. So for badminton, the lower the string tension, the more kinetic energy gets wasted.

    It's like throwing a deflated tennis ball against the ground with all your might vs. throwing a brand new tennis ball against the ground with all your might. The brand new ball bounces higher right? Same principle. Or compare throwing a tennis ball against a brick wall vs throwing it against a mattress.
    Last edited by wristworks; 01-09-2010 at 02:55 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    I said right from the get go that high string tension only increases power if you're strong so I don't know where all this misleading comes from. In fact, throughout the entire post, I made it a point to say that you have to be strong in order to properly utilize higher string tensions.
    I do agree with your point, but I just thought it wasn't clear that it was you and not your string tension that was causing a speed difference (since your post seemed to indicate that a speed difference existed with a change in string tension).
    the other gripe i had was when you said "optimum balance" in the end - which implies that different tension WOULD give you different resultant speeds, which does contradict what i thought. But your explanation of it
    Quote Originally Posted by wristworks View Post
    So everyone's input will be relatively consistent, i.e. I will always use as much strength as I can when I smash, regardless of whether my tension is 19 or 27. So, as I said, let's assume I am a world class player. My input will always be consistently very high. With that consistent input, a racquet strung at 27 lbs will give me more power than a racquet strung at 19 lbs because 27 lbs will release energy FASTER after it's been loaded with potential energy. Sure, you can load the exact same amount of energy onto a racquet strung at 19 lbs. But because the tension is so much lower, the amount of time it takes for that potential energy to be released as kinetic energy is longer. As it stands, that increase in time already means that more energy is wasted. Furthermore, because the racquet is moving at such a fast speed, a lower tension means that the strings might not even be finished snapping before the shuttle leaves your racquet.
    that actually makes a lot of sense, and I hadn't gotten that technical in my thought experiment yet, since i was mostly comparing it with studies done for tennis which showed no difference. But you've changed my mind. That explanation is good.
    Last edited by t3tsubo; 01-09-2010 at 03:09 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by t3tsubo View Post
    This has been scientifically disproved (i can link you to the journal where they did the experiment if you really want, unfortunately no such test has been done for a badminton racquet and shuttlecock). With all other variables the same (swing speed, point of impact, angle etc), the string tension does not affect the speed of the tennis ball.
    You do that, go find that scientific journal.
    I do not believe a science paper will say in tennis, string tension has absolutely no effect on the exiting ball speed.
    Also, don't convince me as i said "but in large part, not necessarily correct". Convince this guy. http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...16&postcount=9
    Last edited by cooler; 01-09-2010 at 03:20 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by t3tsubo View Post
    I do agree with your point, but I just thought it wasn't clear that it was you and not your string tension that was causing a speed difference (since your post seemed to indicate that a speed difference existed with a change in string tension).
    the other gripe i had was when you said "optimum balance" in the end - which implies that different tension WOULD give you different resultant speeds, which does contradict what i thought. But your explanation of it


    that actually makes a lot of sense, and I hadn't gotten that technical in my thought experiment yet, since i was mostly comparing it with studies done for tennis which showed no difference. But you've changed my mind. That explanation is good.
    u should clear up your technical thought before discrediting others base solely on some papers that u probably did not fully understood.

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