User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 19
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    268
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Mens doubles- front player Tips

    Any tips to help get involved more when your the front man in mens doubles? If you watch the pro matches, they get involved ALOT , although often by covering the opened up rear corner after the defense whips it across.
    How do you guys get more involved ?

    Im a fairly decent player but am much more comfortable attacking from the back or driving. When im at the front I find the flattened out returns of smashes go past me too fast , and the steep smashes get returned over my swinging racket as i try to jump to intercept. Tips/strategies? I stand about a foot behind the T. Should I bias myself completely to one side for the straight lift return, or should I stay central?

    Bonus Question! - Watching pros, after a serve the server very often can block the push return , be it down the middle or wide - are they randomly guessing the direction and just going for it ? Perhaps observing opponents grip and return patterns and serving into areas that make it more likely? Or are they just that insanely fast that they can get a racket to these shots?

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    907
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The front player should be constantly moving. He should mostly be staying on the same side as the shuttle in play, be in on his side or his opponent side. This is to allow him to handle the faster, higher percentage shots, the straight replies (assuming his partner mostly plays straight shots).

    When his opponent lifts, he should back away from the net. The deeper the lift, the deeper he'd need to back up. If his partner smashes, he needs to first stay back in anticipation of the faster drive returns. Block returns to the net tends to be slower. If his partner drops, he'd need to move closer to the net to cover net replies, and threaten his opponent to play a high lift.

    He seldom straddles the center line, unless the shots are exchanged right around the center.

    To be able to intercept more shots, his racket needs to be at net level and in front of him often. On the other hand, his partner's shot selection could help proactively prevent a wide-angle cross-court drive to begin with. E.g. hitting to the inside of his opponent in front, instead of hitting down the line shots, or hitting more to the center, paying attention to downward angle more, hitting straight shots instead of constantly hitting cross-court.

    Finally, I'd suggest you dig up some Doubles videos by Lee Jae Bok. First there's a general Doubles video that talks about the basic. Then there's another one called something like "Front Player helping Back Player".

  3. #3
    Regular Member Badmintan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    AMK (Singapore)
    Posts
    1,008
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mojopin View Post
    Bonus Question! - Watching pros, after a serve the server very often can block the push return , be it down the middle or wide - are they randomly guessing the direction and just going for it ? Perhaps observing opponents grip and return patterns and serving into areas that make it more likely? Or are they just that insanely fast that they can get a racket to these shots?
    The videos mentioned by Raymond offers good tips on the cooperation and understanding of doubles play. Probably most important is both players are on the same page.

    I may not be a coach, but high probability (P>0.005) , gripping the racquet higher near the cone and short hitting action allows fast movement to netkill or intercept drives/pushes. I remember, Gillian Clark in some Badminton video mentioned that always hold the racquet high and aggressively hunt the shuttle if you're the frontman (after serving).

    Holding the racquet higher allows you to hit downwards and able to intercept at the highest point. Also I believe, it should be slightly biased to the non-dominant side to allow you to do the round the head action.

    gd luck.
    Last edited by Badmintan; 03-12-2010 at 02:34 AM.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    england, london
    Posts
    139
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i'm left handed and my partner is left when i smash down the line and they flick it to my backhand should my partner bounce from the T and smash the shuttle?every time he just leaves it and i have to dive across to reach it, but when hes smashing from the left i would quickly move from the T and smash it down like to pros so we are always on the attack

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charliebadders View Post
    i'm left handed and my partner is left when i smash down the line and they flick it to my backhand should my partner bounce from the T and smash the shuttle?every time he just leaves it and i have to dive across to reach it, but when hes smashing from the left i would quickly move from the T and smash it down like to pros so we are always on the attack
    If your smash has enough angle, they wouldn't be able to fast drive it to your backhand side. However, if this occurs, the front player should always be aware. He should always have his racket up and interecept if he has the chance.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eunos (Singapore)
    Posts
    129
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The front player can get more action when he/she does not stand too far in front. Otherwise, he/she's only useful when incoming net shots or drops are played, and he/she may become a bystander at the T watching at the fast drives fly all around past him/her. The professional players stand very close to the T at opening rallies because their reflexes are trained to respond at incredible speeds and i think they are also trained to anticipate the trajectory of incoming shots.
    Typically at amateur level, the front player gets less than 50% of shuttle play time during any rally. Standing further back (1 or 2 steps backwards from the T), he/she can increase his chances of:
    - more shuttle play (I'm not exactly advocating the front player trying to snatch all shots: look at the situation)
    - intercepting drive shots flying around him,
    - snatching the initiative from the opponents and pressing it against them,
    - easing any undue pressure on his partner behind him, particularly if his partner was being pinned at any rear corners

    Standing further back from the T only has one disadvantage: the front player has less time to react to net shots and drops.

    Feel free to dissect anything!

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    London
    Posts
    573
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re

    Check out the Lee Jae Bok videos on youtube if you haven't already seen it.

    The two players in the video are both England regulars.

  8. #8
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    14,191
    Mentioned
    48 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mojopin View Post
    Any tips to help get involved more when your the front man in mens doubles? If you watch the pro matches, they get involved ALOT , although often by covering the opened up rear corner after the defense whips it across.
    How do you guys get more involved ?
    Talk to your partner about playing shots that set you up at the front of the court.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    manila
    Posts
    1,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by david14700 View Post
    Check out the Lee Jae Bok videos on youtube if you haven't already seen it.

    The two players in the video are both England regulars.
    Yes. The videos are really helpful.

    It shows there that the player should not just stand immobile. The front player also moves in accordance to the movement and shot of the back player. If the back player is hitting from the far end of the court, the front player should back up near the midcourt. If the player is hitting slightly near the baseline, the front player should adjust by standing neart the short service line. If the back player is hitting from the left, the front player should stand to the left side also. If the back player is hitting from the right, the front player should also stand to the right side. If the player is hitting from the midcourt, the player should either open up or go nearer the net. If the back player hits a smash, the front player should be ready to intercept. If the back player hits a fast or slow drop, the front player should go near the net to anticipate a counterdrop. If the front player would like to help the rear player, his body should be in a diagonal stance. It really depends.

    Basically, being a front player could also be tiring.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    MY/SG
    Posts
    292
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    To ease you.
    Here are the video for double attacking system:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM36Y_90

    When you under pressure and need to help your partner, then watch these 2:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQBNu...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk_Bv...eature=related

    Make your partner to watch it together, then you know what you should do in double.
    Slow video but very useful.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    775
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ralph_lee View Post
    To ease you.
    Here are the video for double attacking system:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM36Y_90

    When you under pressure and need to help your partner, then watch these 2:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQBNu...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk_Bv...eature=related

    Make your partner to watch it together, then you know what you should do in double.
    Slow video but very useful.
    If I would try and practice that at the club, we will start bumping into each other ......you need a partner that also a good player (and someone you can trust) to even attempt practicing this routine ..gosh those pair in the video are really good !

  12. #12
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Penang MY or Melbourne AU
    Posts
    276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    May I share my humble thoughts? Somethings that I do often or observe or try to put in practice:

    1. Be aggressive at the front court and make them lift Once they lift, the front court is yours. Side pushes, mid court pushes or blocks from defence and rushing forward to cover the return drop/net will force them to lift.

    2. Know where your partner is. You gotta know which side is he on and which side he was on. Knowing this will tell you whether he is in an attacking position or is in trouble about to make a clear. Knowing this will also let you know how far you need to drop back to intercept, or know when and which side to drop for side to side defence when he clears.

    3. Keep your racquet up at all times. You need to be quick at the front, a wrist snap is all it takes. Say no need to arm swing. You may be tempted for the wrist snap for a fast quick kill, but you will be suprised at how a sudden block (change in game pace) at the front court will do to a defence.

    3. Hunt for the shuttle, follow the play, be like Ben Stiller in Waterboy.

    4. If you attempt to reach for the shuttle and couldn't (usually out of your reach at your side or above you), instantly alert your partner - a quick 'help!' will do, as he may have stopped going for it thinking you may have gotten it.

    5. Encourage one another and communicate. Never blame your partner. You are nothing without him.

    Justin

  13. #13
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    england, london
    Posts
    139
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    you mean adam sandler in waterboy :P

  14. #14
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scandinavia
    Posts
    43
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Try to look at this vid
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tqUHrEgG28

    Look at the black pair and see how the front player takes the cross lifts it has helped me alot

  15. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I found that keeping the racket up always at the net level tiring. I remember reading in another thread that the front player brings up the racket upon hearing the sound of the back players smash. I am waiting to partner with a good smasher to try this idea at my club.

  16. #16
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I too lift my racket just as my opponent is about to hit the shuttle. This is less tiring and my partner cant hit my racket. Also I show my opponent "look, you can hit in my direction, im not ready". When I lift my racket at the right moment my opponent might try to change direction and make a fault and when the shuttle comes to me, I WILL be ready. Raising the racket too early makes it easier for the opposing player to figure out where he can play safely and where not.

  17. #17
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    26,817
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Front player Tips

    .
    Just found your thread mojopin.

    How are you enjoying your Badminton?

    Hope to catch up with you again soon.
    .

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Short lift to mid court, what does front player do in doubles?
    By Capnx in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 9
    : 01-26-2012, 02:33 AM
  2. Doubles front player problem
    By Jyaki in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 9
    : 05-02-2009, 02:31 AM
  3. Tactics for mixed doubles vs. mens doubles, no gender tournament
    By macazteeg in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 30
    : 04-04-2009, 12:38 AM
  4. Doubles: front man position
    By boilermaker in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 2
    : 10-20-2004, 05:16 AM
  5. how to be effective front man in doubles
    By boilermaker in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 9
    : 02-11-2003, 01:17 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •