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  1. #1
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Thumbs up A Training Centre for Coaches?

    Recently, we have been seeing a lot of upheaval with coaches leaving, resigning, changing, being re-assigned and even signing with foreign countries!

    But mostly, we have noticed that this is happening with people (coaches) who have been around for a long time. These coaches have been in the business of coaching for 15 or 20 years, or even longer. Obviously, they have a lot of experience and knowhow.

    I am interested in knowing which countries actually have a proper centre established for training coaches.

    Do they have any special programmes that allow coaches to update their knowledge and skills?

    Are there any special workshops in various aspects of coaching, which are carried out regularly?

    Do coaches also receive a grading based on their experience, capabilities, knowledge, attitude, achievements etc?

    What is the eligibility criteria for a person who wishes to become a "recognized" or "certified" coach?

    Is there a panel of people (ex-coaches, ex-players, others) who regularly monitor the performance and standards of excellence of the Training Centre itself?

    There are many people on this forum who are professionals, coaches, trainers and others who are very knowledgeable and close to the associations. I would really like to see all of you participate in this discussion. I believe this is a very important aspect of badminton which is not being discussed enough.
    Last edited by cobalt; 03-07-2011 at 01:06 PM. Reason: typo

  2. #2
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up It is part of BWF's idea to promote Badminton worldwide

    .
    In Australia, our National Association encourages coaches to do a 'Coaching Course' offered by them. It is part of BWF's idea to promote Badminton worldwide.

    Yes, I participated and learned much from the course. And BWF sometimes organises top coaches to be sent to different countries.

    I was lucky to meet up with 'The Thing' when he came to visit Australia.
    .

  3. #3
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    .
    In Australia, our National Association encourages coaches to do a 'Coaching Course' offered by them. It is part of BWF's idea to promote Badminton worldwide.

    Yes, I participated and learned much from the course. And BWF sometimes organises top coaches to be sent to different countries.

    I was lucky to meet up with 'The Thing' when he came to visit Australia.
    .
    That is a BWF initiative you have cited. What about individual countries and their national associations? What constant efforts do they take?

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    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow BWF assist all National Associations registered with them

    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    That is a BWF initiative you have cited. What about individual countries and their national associations? What constant efforts do they take?
    .
    BWF assist all National Associations registered with them.

    The coaching education course is an important BWF development project (for promoting Badminton worldwide). And it is available to all countries through their National Associations.
    .

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    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    .
    BWF assist all National Associations registered with them.

    The coaching education course is an important BWF development project (for promoting Badminton worldwide). And it is available to all countries through their National Associations.
    .
    How many years do you think it takes for a person to become a top-level coach?

    Do you know why so many countries and their national associations do not have enough good coaches at the highest levels?

    And do you think there is enough emphasis on acquiring and developing new coaching talent to replace coaches who retire or move elsewhere?

  6. #6
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Politics in their National Associations controls it

    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post

    (1) How many years do you think it takes for a person to become a top-level coach?

    (2) Do you know why so many countries and their national associations do not have enough good coaches at the highest levels?

    (3) And do you think there is enough emphasis on acquiring and developing new coaching talent to replace coaches who retire or move elsewhere?
    .
    (1) A coach is a teacher. A teacher does not need that many number of years (of teaching experience) to become a top-level teacher. Some good teachers have their natural talents that can make them excellent teachers in a very short time.

    (2) It can be said that good players do not necessarily become good coaches. It's just unlucky that some countries are unable to find their top players (who have retired from playing in tournaments) becoming good coaches.

    (3) Politics in their National Associations controls it.
    .

  7. #7
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Is it not possible to find potentially good coaches outside the bandwidth of top players and ex-players?

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    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Lightbulb The ability to coach has nothing to do with the ability to play

    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Is it not possible to find potentially good coaches outside the bandwidth of top players and ex-players?
    .
    Yes, it is possible.

    The ability to coach has nothing to do with the ability to play.
    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    That is a BWF initiative you have cited. What about individual countries and their national associations? What constant efforts do they take?
    In China, the professional players in order to become coaches, they have to go through a 2,000 hours course. To coach a local team, I believe any person could do it, but only individuals that attained the level of National player are eligible to coach a Provincial team.

    Having also participated on a Level 1 coaching course in Canada, I can say is quite different. Here it appears that anyone can register to a Level 1 coaching course, independent of their playing level. The Level 1 course here had a duration of 15 hours and divided the time between badminton techniques, teaching methodologies and the social aspects of the game.

    Before coming to Canada, I took 3 coaching courses on badminton. First one, a 30 hour technical skills conducted by a China National team coach. Second one, 50-hour for badminton (introductory level) theory and techniques by a China National level coach, first-aid by registered nurses, physiology by a sports medicine doctor and training theory (general) by a PE teacher. Third one, a 50 hour badminton theory and practice (intermediate level) by a China National coach, covering more on skills analysis, training and developmental methodologies for beginners and more advanced players.

    These courses are all free, sponsored by the Government, local Badminton Association and China Badminton Association. Participants are chosen by the respective clubs, usually not opened to the general public.

  10. #10
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    Agreed with Politics. So you have to be in the group to go up.

    It will help if you already play at competitive level. It's the mental, discipline, human communication, competency part which you need to focus on when training top level players.

    Everyone have similar physical speed or stamina. 99% mental, 1% physical

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    Regular Member pBmMalaysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Is it not possible to find potentially good coaches outside the bandwidth of top players and ex-players?
    Simply their education level,

    Most of the top players plays and train more than studying

    So when it comes to sports science it will be quite hard for them to excel

    Beside been a coach, you have to learn how to manage the players, eh.. almost everything

  12. #12
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by viver View Post
    In China, the professional players in order to become coaches, they have to go through a 2,000 hours course. To coach a local team, I believe any person could do it, but only individuals that attained the level of National player are eligible to coach a Provincial team.

    (snip...)

    Before coming to Canada, I took 3 coaching courses on badminton. First one, a 30 hour technical skills conducted by a China National team coach. Second one, 50-hour for badminton (introductory level) theory and techniques by a China National level coach, first-aid by registered nurses, physiology by a sports medicine doctor and training theory (general) by a PE teacher. Third one, a 50 hour badminton theory and practice (intermediate level) by a China National coach, covering more on skills analysis, training and developmental methodologies for beginners and more advanced players.

    These courses are all free, sponsored by the Government, local Badminton Association and China Badminton Association. Participants are chosen by the respective clubs, usually not opened to the general public.
    @vivier: Do you know how often these courses were conducted over a year, in China? Are the 130-hour courses held at just one centre, or are there more than one in the country?

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    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pBmMalaysia View Post
    Simply their education level,

    Most of the top players plays and train more than studying

    So when it comes to sports science it will be quite hard for them to excel

    Beside been a coach, you have to learn how to manage the players, eh.. almost everything
    Top players obviously have the advantage of picking up a lot of knowledge "on the job" or "on the field" and they are also able to instinctively judge the potential of a prospect. Most of the times, anyway.

    But coaching is more than just training on court. As many of you have pointed out, a top player does not necessarily make a top coach.

    In countries where training and coaching facilities exist for coaches, is there a panel of people (ex-coaches, ex-players, others) who regularly monitor the performance and standards of excellence of the Training Centre itself?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    @vivier: Do you know how often these courses were conducted over a year, in China? Are the 130-hour courses held at just one centre, or are there more than one in the country?
    These courses are held depending on the availability of the coaches. Often held during the off-season, usually during the months of summer when the players have their breaks. It's not something that is scheduled, but the local association does promote the courses whenever the opportunity arises.

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    Regular Member pBmMalaysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Top players obviously have the advantage of picking up a lot of knowledge "on the job" or "on the field" and they are also able to instinctively judge the potential of a prospect. Most of the times, anyway.

    But coaching is more than just training on court. As many of you have pointed out, a top player does not necessarily make a top coach.

    In countries where training and coaching facilities exist for coaches, is there a panel of people (ex-coaches, ex-players, others) who regularly monitor the performance and standards of excellence of the Training Centre itself?
    Not all top players picked up all knowledge "on the job" or "on the field"

    In Malaysia, we have communication problems with some players - English.

    So if they don't understand and don't bother to ask then they won't learn anything mentally but only physically.

    and probably very happy after they are over

    I know this because when I was taking my courses every time, there were ex national players inside.

    Believe me some doesn't even know the difference between aerobic and anaerobic just to quote one example

    For a former top player to make it into coaching arena, he or she has to have tons of passion for that.

    Willing to study hard for the courses at the same time and when they start off,

    They have to accept a smaller pay

    Pang cc is a good doubles coach and as assistant to rexy and he has been there for many years

    and his pay I don't think it's very high! It's his passion for badminton and a simple life style I suppose

    About those ex player giving feedback to national association, I think it will only works if they are part of it

  16. #16
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Who are the top coaches that BWF employs or uses as consultants, to provide traiing to national coaches? Are they all ex players, or are there also other professionals?

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    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default SBA (Singapore Badminton Association) Coaching Courses

    I observe that our SBA is conducting more coaching courses. There were fewer and sporadic courses in the past.

    Such courses used to be catered more to teachers who are in charge of their school teams and during school holidays, but I guess many outsiders are also interested as more kids and adults play the game now.

    Details can be found in SBA's website:

    http://www.singaporebadminton.org.sg...iteCentre.aspx

    In the old days, there was no formal assessment of one's badminton skills, but now the SBA makes sure that the trainee coach must possess certain basic skills before being allowed to attend the Level 1 course. I support this.

    From the SBA website can be found the following notices:

    BADMINTON SKILL TEST (BADMINTON COACHING COURSE)

    1. The above test is scheduled on Thursday, 14th April 2011 at 7pm, at the
    Singapore Sports School Badminton Hall.

    2. To ensure that you have the basic required skills to coach at the foundation
    level or Level 1, a panel of coaches qualified coaches (NCAP Level 2 or higher) to
    assess your basic skills prior to admitting you for the actual course. The test will
    enable you to assess your competency level in the sports and have a better idea on
    what is required of a badminton coach.

    3. Registration fee for the Skills Test is S$32.10 (inclusive of GST) per participant.

    NCAP Technical Level 1

    Fee: $374.50 (inclusive 7% GST)
    Date/Time: 3 – 16 May 2011, (weekdays,7pm-10pm)
    Venue: Singapore Sports School

    NCAP Technical Level 2

    Fee: $428.00 (inclusive 7% GST)
    Date/Time: 11 – 25 April 2011, (weekdays,7pm-10pm)
    Venue: Singapore Sports School

    The SBA only conducts the "Technical" or practical course while the "Theory" part is left to the Singapore Sports Council, which employs qualified professionals like physical education lecturers, sports scientists and other sports specialists to deliver the lectures. Our SSC has close collaboration with their counterparts in Australia and Canada especially, since English is the main medium of instruction and adopts the NCAP programme with modifications to suit the local context.

    To qualify for a full certificate, participants must pass both the technical and theory examinations and a certain time period of practical attachments.

    The lecturers for the Theory aspects are usually well-qualified on their specialised fields but I think the trainers for the Technical parts, Level 1 & 2, are usually from local coaches who many not be as qualified in "academic" terms, in the sense that they may not have a coaching certificate or degree from a recognized institution like a university or even the BWF, which conducts coaching courses from time to time.

    The SSC also provides NCAP Theory courses for Level 3 coaching, but I hardly see any Technical Level 3 courses organised by the SBA in recent history. There was one conducted in 2005 with a German lecturer who is now attached with BWF in one of its training academies in Europe. During that course, a number of ex-national players attended. I guess good and qualified lecturers are hard to come by for Level 3 badminton. But there are many more coaches who qualified at this level in other sports.

    However, ex-National players and foreign coaches with the right qualfications are accreditated with the SBA up to Technical Level 3 currently. Most of them come from China and Indonesia.

    And there is a National Registry of Coaches (NROC) to recognised all qualified and accreditated coaches:

    http://www.ssc.gov.sg/publish/Coache...roc_coach.html

    I wish someone can tell me more about the coach training system in China.
    Last edited by Loh; 04-13-2011 at 12:36 AM.

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