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  1. #18
    Regular Member blindfury's Avatar
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    when exactly did you discover this method? lol~

  2. #19
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    the past few months. i saw it in some Chinese stringing video on youtube (not the ES5Pro one). so i started experimenting with it and voila!

    the true master is the guy in the ES5Pro video, he made it so smooth and quick like it was 2nd nature.

  3. #20
    Regular Member johnlowe88's Avatar
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    Kwun,

    Hi. If I had joined this forum 10 years ago, I might have saved you guys a lot of time. Back in 1983 when I started stringing, we used a tennis awl to do this - basically one that does not have a sharp point. Photo attached. The awl is used to move the string on a shared grommet in order to thread the string. With a 2-point machine, we never did a preweave.
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    This awl is a multipurpose tool. We use it to remove string after it has been cut from a racquet, guide cross strings as we are pulling to avoid friction scoring or burning and for straightening string when tensioning. The only basic tools we used was this, a long-nosed plier and flying clamps - aside from the string cutter. By the way, the string cutter is like a small switch-blade, we cut down the crosses in one stroke, then across the mains in another stroke, then use the awl to pull the strings out (once the tension is released, they have a bit of a loop out of the grommets and the awl goes in and pull, then next one etc. The strings with knots, the plier is used to pull out from the inside.

    -John

  4. #21
    Regular Member CovinaStringer's Avatar
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    That's cool, I just make a sharp tip and lube the tip with chapstick and insert 1mm at a time. But that looks so effortless. The other way is to use a badminton awl and gently insert into the shared hole to clear the way for the string.

  5. #22
    Regular Member johnlowe88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CovinaStringer View Post
    That's cool, I just make a sharp tip and lube the tip with chapstick and insert 1mm at a time. But that looks so effortless. The other way is to use a badminton awl and gently insert into the shared hole to clear the way for the string.
    Hi, we stopped putting anything in the grommet - back then, steel and aluminium heads were quite sharp and pushing an awl into the grommet would more than likely damage the grommet, then next thing you know, the strings start breaking sometime later. I use a 10x loupe to visually inspect grommet where there are string breakage, and every so often, find one that has been cut through and we can see the metal.

    Maybe sometime I will take some video and show how this awl is used.

    -John

  6. #23
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    I've been using this technique ever since I started stringing.

    However, the opposite side grommet has been causing me some real frustration with some rackets. For some reason, doing this from inside the racket just doesn't work. I've even had to jump over that grommet once and come back down one cross (yes, shameful), after spending more than 20 minutes trying to get the string through.

    What techniques do you use to get the string through that one grommet ? (The one on the opposite side from the one shown in the video :P)

  7. #24
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    Thumbs up Hats off

    I noticed with new generations of rackets the manufacturers have a lot more consideration for the stringer overall, including providing larger grommets where they r shared and lately even skewed the non-shared grommets at the top where the previous string usually blanks out the underlying grommet making it difficult to get the string to by-pass the latter. Hats off to all that.

  8. #25
    Regular Member johnlowe88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yan.v View Post
    I've been using this technique ever since I started stringing.

    However, the opposite side grommet has been causing me some real frustration with some rackets. For some reason, doing this from inside the racket just doesn't work. I've even had to jump over that grommet once and come back down one cross (yes, shameful), after spending more than 20 minutes trying to get the string through.

    What techniques do you use to get the string through that one grommet ? (The one on the opposite side from the one shown in the video :P)
    A couple of hints perhaps.

    I cut the end of the string at an angle - sometimes this helps it to get into a shared hole easier, and push it a bit at a time using long nose pliers - I mentioned previously that over a short length, the string is quite stiff and will go through.

    If it doesn't, sometime it helps to use another string - a little thicker than the string you are using to string with, and push this in from the outside, just enough so that you can see it on the inside of the hole. Then push your string, and pull the other string out - it takes a little practice to feel the pressure, but this way, the thicker string going back out allows the thinner string to go through before the hole closes up from the existing string. Does this make sense?

    I also recently have been stringing my Babolat racquets - and the standard practice is to start the crosses - sort of in the middle. With occasional shared holes, it can be very awkward to get the string through from the inside, so a bit of patience and the techniques above usually work.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlowe88 View Post
    A couple of hints perhaps.

    I cut the end of the string at an angle - sometimes this helps it to get into a shared hole easier, and push it a bit at a time using long nose pliers - I mentioned previously that over a short length, the string is quite stiff and will go through.

    If it doesn't, sometime it helps to use another string - a little thicker than the string you are using to string with, and push this in from the outside, just enough so that you can see it on the inside of the hole. Then push your string, and pull the other string out - it takes a little practice to feel the pressure, but this way, the thicker string going back out allows the thinner string to go through before the hole closes up from the existing string. Does this make sense?

    I also recently have been stringing my Babolat racquets - and the standard practice is to start the crosses - sort of in the middle. With occasional shared holes, it can be very awkward to get the string through from the inside, so a bit of patience and the techniques above usually work.
    Cutting the string at an angle hasn't been working for me, but your other technique sounds like it could work very well, I'll try it!

    Thank you!

  10. #27
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    Default Awkward shared holes

    If I have a particularly awkward shared hole and have the 'right' type of string (Can only work with multifilament string that is well bound to the outer coating) I use the following technique:

    Using a trimming knife, trim off the outer coating of the string (about 15mm) as if stripping an electrical wire.

    Wet the exposed filaments which will now easily find there way through the shared hole, then pull the string through from the other side using pliers. It's fiddly but can be less frustrating than having many failed attempts.

    Sometimes the filaments may go either side of the string already in the hole, in which case try to push them through on one side or the other; alternatively just pull on the largest bulk of filaments which usually works.

    For some types of string this works every time without any stress, however some string is unsuitable for this technique. The outer coating will stick and pucker up instead of pulling through.

    Note the filaments are very fine so you will need a good of pliers with no gaps in the jaws.


    Hope this helps

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by seldont View Post
    If I have a particularly awkward shared hole and have the 'right' type of string (Can only work with multifilament string that is well bound to the outer coating) I use the following technique:

    Using a trimming knife, trim off the outer coating of the string (about 15mm) as if stripping an electrical wire.

    Wet the exposed filaments which will now easily find there way through the shared hole, then pull the string through from the other side using pliers. It's fiddly but can be less frustrating than having many failed attempts.

    Sometimes the filaments may go either side of the string already in the hole, in which case try to push them through on one side or the other; alternatively just pull on the largest bulk of filaments which usually works.

    For some types of string this works every time without any stress, however some string is unsuitable for this technique. The outer coating will stick and pucker up instead of pulling through.

    Note the filaments are very fine so you will need a good of pliers with no gaps in the jaws.


    Hope this helps
    You just saved my wall from a pliers throw and literally shaved off like 15-20 lost minutes when I'm stringing
    I'll be doing this from now on with noncooperative shared holes (from the inside)

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by seldont View Post
    If I have a particularly awkward shared hole and have the 'right' type of string (Can only work with multifilament string that is well bound to the outer coating) I use the following technique:
    ...
    Thanks for the great tip! I was about to give up on my first stringing job and was saved by this tip!

    Kwun,
    I used your technique to thread from outside in and it worked. However, I couldn't figure out how to thread from inside out. Can you make a video for that situation?

  13. #30
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    Hopefully this helps, when you're pulling the string with the string mover, pull them with the direction towards the North or South towers depending on which side you're on, North or South. This works both ways, inside grommet to out or outside to inside.

    Example (Yonex method): Start knot cross at B6, then first cross is at B9, then you'll fine a shared hole on B10 (outside to inside shared grommet), use the string mover and pull the main string in the direction towards the south tower or 6 o'clock, weave then do the same again at the other side of B10 (this time its inside to outside) and still pull with the string mover towards the south tower. This should help you get through your shared holes with ease.

    This works for both thin and thick strings but at very high tensions, you'll have to take more care in doing this as you'll have to make sure that your hook of the string mover is pulling the main strings properly or else it will slip (as when you're pulling a 30lbs 0.65mm main string and they don't really budge) and the string may break. The probability of having more problems is probably the last main string furthermost of the frame, B12 main string.

    Good luck

  14. #31
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    I tried to use the string puller some work fine and some don't and at the same time I actually saw the whole racket turn.

  15. #32
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    Yup tried this it helps a lot but sometimes from the inside-out it is more difficult to push.
    is there any tool for doing this faster.

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