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  1. #1
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    Default malaysia badminton at grass root level

    what do u think about badminton in schools and ect.

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    May 23, 2010 22:28 PM

    Badminton Development Should Be Intensified, Says Misbun


    MELAKA, May 23 (Bernama) -- The badminton development programme in the country should be intensified to be on par with that of other countries, especially China, national singles coach Datuk Misbun Sidek said Sunday.

    He said China had been giving its young shuttlers intensive training from the age of 13 and when they reached 17 or 18, most of them had become world-class shuttlers.

    "In Malaysia, we usually wait until they finish secondary school (17 years old) before we give them intensive training.

    "By then, we are three or four years behind," he told reporters when met at the closing of the Nusa Mahsuri Badminton Camp by Melaka Welfare, Unity, Youth and Sports Committee chairman Datuk Ab Karim Ab Sulaiman, here, today.

    Misbun said the camp, organised annually over the past 10 years, was opened only to those aged eight to 12, in a bid to develop their talent before they reached 17.

    After attending the camp, the young shuttlers would be exposed to badminton tournaments at the school, state and national levels, and those with the potential to shine in the sport, would be recommended to join the Bukit Jalil Sports School, he added.

    -- BERNAMA

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    Misbun is right on this. BAM and the Ministry of Sports may want to send a fact finding delegation to China as guests of CBA to learn more.

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    misbun is wrong and shallow-minded for a national coach.
    he shld instead learn from south korea and japan 1st b4 wasting time to visit CHN.

    how can badminton minnows like JPN can beat MAS in boleh-land? HOW ?
    last time, we also engaged PJB as head coach but what happened? there was no achievement.

    how can South Korea ladies beat the invincible Chinese in UC final? HOW?
    last time, we also engaged Li Mao, Tan Kim Her but what happened? again, there was no achievement.

    maybe he juz wanna find excuse and opportunity to 'taste' the PRC delicacy there.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pralinescream View Post
    how can badminton minnows like JPN can beat MAS in boleh-land? HOW ?
    last time, we also engaged PJB as head coach but what happened? there was no achievement.
    well
    thats because u stil live in the pass
    as if malaysia still that good to beat japan 3-0

    for ur question
    that show not the problem of the coach we hired
    is the how the manager deal with the coach
    lol
    3 years old question

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    Quote Originally Posted by alwayslolzzz View Post
    what do u think about badminton in schools and ect.
    Malaysian badminton at school eat grass! Why? Allow me to share a true story, may be it is typically happening all over the country.

    My son started badminton very late during his Form 4-5 days, no thanks to the lack of sports activity in school. One day I noticed that he was actually playing at private courts with his classmates. So I asked why didn't they play at school. His immediate reply was that there was no badminton hall. I was surprised. Surely the school would have a hall for school assemblies. His answer was the assembly was held outdoor, in case it rains, the "dewan" (hall) is the ground floor space below the classrooms. I was told, actually there were outdoor courts in the school but there were no nets available or it was difficult to borrow from the sports teacher. I suggested they buy and share a net. However, my son admitted that the net was not actually the problem. Guess what the biggest joke was? There was no post from the net!

    It is difficult to imagine a modern, government secondary school in KL, with more than 1000 students do not have the basic sports facility. No indoor hall, no net and no posts for badminton. Badminton and sports in general are really neglected nowadays especially at the government schools. At this rate, we can never reach out to uncover the badminton talents needed to win back the Thomas Cup.

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    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    I'm sure there are still a lot of 'kampung' talent in Malaysia out there.

    Just the 'one' in charge doesn't do their job good.

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    I find these personal attack on Misbun unwarranted. Misbun seems to do no right. When he was player criticism was heaped on him. Granted that he didnt produce much results as a player. The guy who use Japan as an example too doesnt seem to understand what's developing in Japan.

    Misbun is right when he says about systematic training. Why? Because he was a victim of a lack of Systematic training. China being a communist country invest heavily in sports and Badminton takes up a lot of attention from the government. In the 60s, there was no badminton talent in CHina. The three best Badminton players were imported from Indonesia. China set up soviet style training and scouting regime all over the country. It took them 15 years to produce next generation of players capable of taking over Thing, How and Fang.

    Typically their juniors at the 16 to 19 age do not seem to shine too brightly from other nations. But those young bodies were trained from 13 years up, daily from 6 to 6. Doing smashes robotically in one hour and strokes in another. From 20 years onwards the juniors were pushed hard to close the gap if not surpass the seniors in achievements.

    Malaysia after 1970s, the training methods were still in amateur mode with dedicated part timers trying very hard to find the next Aik Huang, Ng Boon Bee, Punch Gunalan. With no help from the government, no enthusiasm from parents who would rather their children put time in academics rather than sports.

    Thus our players in the 70s though not as bad as it seemed but they were not prepared for the commitment and support of governments like Indonesia were investing in their team.

    Give this back drop, an enthusiastic and patriotic father did to his sons what the Chinese Government were doing nationwide with 100 million children. Haji Sidek did what he could to hone the skills of his sons. He was not technically trained in all aspect of the game but he did what he could. He could not force his beat his sons to do 100 push ups nor do 100 jump smashes no father could do that.

    No Malaysian father would even allow a coach to do that to his children then and now.

    Other dedicated coaches spotted his children's talents and brought them to VI to train at least VI has a long tradition of emphasis in sports, Had they stayed in Banting, finding a badminton net pole would be akin to finding a pot of gold they would have disappeared into oblivion like their father when he was a player in the late 50s. There were no 100 Jump smashes in training. Emphasis was on stroke development and tactics. The athlete was treated as an amateur not to punish his body to the limits. AT VI Misbun trained more often but he was already 17 and very skinny.
    Han Jian Liem Swee King Luan Jin were all beefy and muscular.
    Misbun had talent and used it to make an impact. But his game and his training methods were fit for the 50s and 60s not the fast and power play of the late 70s and early 80s. Because of his sudden rise as a dark horse that had beaten several top players in 82 and 83, the government took notice. The juniors too were a little bit more inspired. Foo Kok Keong fellow Victorian though several years junior once told that had Misbun not made an impact in those years he would have hung up his racket as he was leaving school but Misbun’s exploits gave the juniors then some hope of challenging China and Indonesia.
    Because of this, Chinese coaches were brought in to modernise our players. But they could only work on 18 year old and the seniors, too late to turn them into world champions less so to even dominate. But at least it was a start.
    That ‘s why you will find that most Malaysian single players would only stamp their mark around the age of 25 to 27 often they would be rank around 4 or 5 rarely rank No.1 because China and Indonesia’s talents were trained systematically much earlier than ours.

    But I disagree with Misbun that we must emulate China, We cant we are a democratic nation no matter how flawed and our government cannot force or take away our children to be trained as robotic champions for the glory of the nation. It must be by voluntary basis and Malaysia has lost many potential talents because some of them chose academics rather then sports.
    As for Misbun the coach, which Malaysian coach has coached two All England champions? Tepuklah dada Tanya selera.
    Japanese players have improved. This is because there is more emphasis of developing their players’ techniques and physical strength. That’s why their singles have made an impact. Couple with a talented badminton offspring of another badminton playing family has raise Japan’s profile a bit these last few years and maybe another 5 years. However without the systematic training and scouting and financial support of the Chinese government the Japanese success could not be sustained.

  9. #9
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    I would say Malaysia still have future in badminton though. Still it will always be an up and down situation. Competition is always there from the big nations like China and Indonesia. There will also be a few from India, Thailand and Denmark or even Japan once a while.

    The important thing is to keep up with the momentum of having more badminton tournaments from school level, town level (closed games), district level (circuits), state level (sukma) and national level. That is why it is important for BAM to guide and fund these small bodies accordingly. Still some are very enterprising by hooking up with local sponsors (eg. Taiping Open managed to get sponsors and give reasonable price money to attract top players).

    During my days, courts, shuttles and rackets are difficult to come by and we are glad to get the chance to see the top state players in the 80s like the young cheah soon kit, chong weng kai, fung brothers playing in small towns and in various towns. This gives them exposure as they get the chance to play against very experience veterans. Even cheah soon kit lost to some of the veterans (in doubles of course). In singles, he breezes through with his liem swee king like smashes. Exposure is very very important, it just make a player much more versatile having exposed to different players. Volume does matters in badminton. Not that many are as gifted as lindan or taufik. LCW worked hard for it by waking up early and doing all the routines no matter how boring it is. This is call perseverance and attitude.

    So, the momentum is there, just get some responsible and credible people to manage the association/club. Not easy though as the world is full of people with different agendas. Having a cohesive committee would be good. Eg. the Taiping members with one experience Malaysian umpire (Mr Tang) does help to develop the sport. Even though Taiping does not have any top players, they still managed to attract top players to entertain the crowd. They even managed to attract people from england to join in (like a bunch of 40 of them).

    So, all is not lost. For the juniors, just work hard and look for a role model be it LCW or Lindan. Once you can develop a mentality like them, you can be successful. No one is expecting you to be top all the time though. Certainly not easy. Once you are a big champion like All england or WC.. its satisfying and you may hang your racket, enjoy life and retire peacefully.

    As for ways to deal with officials with their own agendas, just report them and bring it to this forum anonymously. This will make them wake up and straight things out again. Make full use of the media or resources like internet. No one can be a dictator now days. Its democracy and say what you like (sensibly of course). You are reading this right? Just do it.

    I like Misbun spirit of going pro and goin AWOL and came back with a bang. Thats the spirit.

  10. #10
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    ..as i mentioned before, just wait a few more yrs til LD, BCL and FHF & CY retire & their younger players rise and be challenged...then we'd probably see a glimmer of hope for not only MAS, but other baddy powerhouses..some also would say the CHN's women's team's domination is "over" or their "wall has been cracked", after their loss to KOR in this yr's UC, but we shall see in a few yrs time..
    Last edited by ctjcad; 06-08-2010 at 12:10 PM.

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    well i think there should be more tournaments at town and district levels. i've seen many young players who have the talent to at least make it as a state player but fail. having only 2 or 3 tournaments per year and many of these playrs geting a really crappy draw for all these tournaments most don't make it even at state level. i'm not sying they have no chance but when they are good enough to at least make the semi finals but yet they are drawn to play either the eventual champion or runner up they really do get disheartend. further more because of the lack of tournaments these players do not get the exposure. if an inexperienced player can get 19 or force a deuce when playing an experienced state player, that guy has got talent. but sadly they don't get many chances to show what they have and without the exposure their potential are not realized. this is a real problem in states like johor sabah sarawak ect.

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