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  1. #1
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    Default Switching from long serve to short serve in singles

    Hey everyone, over the last month or two, I have been working on switching my singles serve; I use to serve forehand/long serve, and now I serve backhand style/short serve.

    Sometimes people hit it on my backhand and I am forced to do a backhand clear or a tight drop shot; other times people do a double action move followed by a net shot.

    I noticed that the short serve gives some of my singles opponents problems, while other opponents have trouble with a long high serve.

    Anyone have some advice on the whole short/long serve situation? Like, what shots should I be worried about on the backhand short serve, or the long/high serve?

    Cheers

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    It depend on situations.If you serve in forehand court,then you must aware in backhand court.Another is you serve in backhand court so do not worry in your backhand rear court you can get it.About return with drop shot do not worry ,let's concentate in your short serve if you do it as close as possible in short serve line with projection low down ,for me if you can do this it very hard for me to do tight spin net shot.And the last about deception,you need to gain in experience ,no need to worry if they can do well then just let's it gone and next time you will learn it.Then it will make them harder to deceptive you again.

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    If you're serving backhand in singles, you have to able to keep your opponent guessing by having and using an occasional deep flick serve. If you're always serving short, you will be in trouble.

    And in order to be able to do a proper flick serve, it is very important that you stand with your racket foot forward by 6-12 inches. You will see this proper stance in all high level competitors using the backhand serve.

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    I am a big advocate of the high serve in singles. Even at fairly high levels it often gets a more favourable reply than the short serve. The short serve is very easy to return and gain the attack in singles. You will find that most players can do a lot of things to hurt you off a shot serve; it's very easy to hit a flatter lift in to either corner. There are numerous other shots that can put you in all kinds of trouble as well - if they pick the serve early and can hit a tight net shot it's bad but not catastrophic; that is unless you move back too early. To hit the shot serve and make it effective in singles you need two things - speed and confidence. Speed should be pretty obvious, if you're fast you'll find it much easier to cover some of the difficult shots that you'll probably end up having to cover. Of course, this is true in badminton in general, not just after serving short. The second point, confidence, is perhaps less obvious to some of you but I think it's important when you're serving short because without it you'll probably commit to a move too early and then watch the shuttle go in completely the opposite direction. Having the confidence in yourself to wait and see what your opponent does instead of just taking a guess is essential for your short serve to be effective.

    To second what visor posted, any serve be it backhand or forehand needs variety, you can't be successful at the higher the higher levels without being able to hit a good flick/high serve and a good short/low serve to keep your opponent guessing. Most people, even at the professional level, have a "bread and butter" serve - the serve that they favour over the other and use perhaps 60% of the time if not more. Of course, you'll find that most pro players' other serves are also exemplary despite the fact they are not employed quite as regularly.

    If I'm playing an opponent who is clearly struggling with one of my serves or gives very ordinary returns I'll use that serve more often than not whilst still throwing in some of the other serve on occasion for variety. For example, I remember playing a tournament a couple of months ago and my first round opponent hit a high lift off every short serve I played, hence why I used the short serve a lot and won the match quite comfortably. Sometimes variety isn't essential and picking on a weakness turns out to be more effective but you should still hit one or two of the other serve in a game just to keep your opponent guessing.

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    Great points! You guys are right, I need to add more variety to my serve, keep my opponents guessing right
    from the start of the game. So often, I just play the serve too straight forward and then wonder why I lost so many points
    off my serve.

    My backhand flick serve is really weak right now; I can only do it a couple of times before all of my flick ability is gone.
    I'm not sure what muscles or technique is required to do a good backhand flick serve but I would be interested in learning if
    anyone wanted to share.

    I also think the long serve is underplayed in singles; however, I am enjoying the backhand short serve as it's new to me
    and kind of exciting...lol

    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinG View Post
    My backhand flick serve is really weak right now; I can only do it a couple of times before all of my flick ability is gone.
    I'm not sure what muscles or technique is required to do a good backhand flick serve but I would be interested in learning if
    anyone wanted to share.
    Cheers
    Make sure you're standing with your racket foot forward by 6-12 inches as I mentioned above. This will give you room to swing for a flick serve effectively. Practice alternating short and flick serves in this position for 15 minutes and you'll get the hang of it.

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    I can't agree more. Thanks for your advice!

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Make sure you're standing with your racket foot forward by 6-12 inches as I mentioned above. This will give you room to swing for a flick serve effectively. Practice alternating short and flick serves in this position for 15 minutes and you'll get the hang of it.
    I agree with half of this. You should have your racket foot in front (I usually just put my feet shoulder-width apart along the center line, with toes pointing more or less towards the net, not with your feet perpendicular to the net), but that should be your foot positioning for both normal short serves and flicks. The point of a "flick" is that there's not a big swing involved. It's supposed to be a last-second wrist snap that catches your opponent offguard. The basic motion up until the last second should be identical for short serves and flick serves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by supralover23 View Post
    I agree with half of this. You should have your racket foot in front (I usually just put my feet shoulder-width apart along the center line, with toes pointing more or less towards the net, not with your feet perpendicular to the net), but that should be your foot positioning for both normal short serves and flicks. The point of a "flick" is that there's not a big swing involved. It's supposed to be a last-second wrist snap that catches your opponent offguard. The basic motion up until the last second should be identical for short serves and flick serves.
    Yes, I didn't make myself clear enough.

    The initial basic swing should be exactly the same for both short and flick serves for effective deception. Only just before the contact with the bird, then you can decide to decelerate and push it short, or accelerate with the wrist and flick it deep.

    Having said that, standing with the racket foot forward a bit allows a slightly longer initial basic swing and also helps to loosen your muscles for a more effective flick serve, if you choose to do it. If you look at the pro players, they're either standing with both feet even or racket foot forward when serving backhand... never non-racket foot forward.

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    I played badminton today and to my amazement, what you guys told me
    to do on my backhand flick serve actually worked!

    I thought it would take weeks of practise, but with a little bit of effort and direction,
    I was able to flick serve quite well; however, I wasn't able to flick it all the way to the back of the court but I think that will come with some more practise.

    Cheers

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