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  1. #137
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Sliced Flat Clear

    .
    Adding in the term "Sliced Flat Clear" in our list before I forget.

    * Alley = The area between the tram lines (the 2 side lines and/or the 2 back lines).
    * Around-the-Head Forehand Shot = A stroke striking the shuttlecock high above our head on the backhand side using a forehand grip.
    * Back Tram Lines = The area between the last 2 lines at the back of the court.
    * Base Position = (For Singles Games) is the middle position between the net and the back line, and the middle position between the side lines.
    * Block = A shot hit by a racket-head swung with little or no movement at all. A Block Return of a Smash is most common.
    * Boleh = "Yes, we can" in Malaysian. It is yelled/cheered to players to encourage them to play better.
    * Bounce = A Dribble when we meet the shuttlecock 10cm below the net tape.
    * Carry = A scooping action on a shuttlecock during a stroke production. Some Australians call it a "Scoop".
    * Clear = Any shot played high (higher than the racket head held high) to our opponent.
    * Cut = Slice; A shot made when we hit the side of the cork of the shuttlecock.
    * Deception = To fool and/or to wrong foot our opponent. Make him/her think we are executing this shot when we are playing another shot.
    * Defensive Clear = An overhead or underarm Clear executed to our opponent's Back Tram Lines; allowing us more time to return to our base position.
    * Dribble = Any shot played from ones' own forecourt to the opponents' forecourt with the shuttle passing in close proximity to the net tape.
    * Drill = A repetitious exercise as a means of learning and perfecting our skills (strokes, footwork, etc, ...).
    * Drive Return of Smash = A shot driven back quickly before our opponent is ready to intercept or to return it.
    * Drive Service = A Service that is hit hard and fast, hoping to pass past a receiver before he/she is ready to intercept it.
    * Dropshot = A shot played from our overhead position to the Fore Court of our opponent's court.
    * Floating Base = The base area considered as best for us to get to the corners (in time), before the shuttlecock travels there.
    * Fore Court = The area between the service line and the net.
    * Jia You = "Add Fuel" in Chinese (Mandarin). It is yelled/cheered to players to become stronger physically and mentally.
    * Kill = Hitting the shuttlecock in a downward direction to opponent's court with maximum power hoping to finish a rally.
    * Lift = A Clear which is played from an underarm stroke.
    * Mid Court = The area between the Fore Court and the Back Tram Lines.
    * Overhead Backhand Stroke = A stroke striking the shuttlecock high above our head on the backhand side using a backhand grip.
    * Overhead Forehand Stroke = A stroke striking the shuttlecock high above our head with a forehand grip.
    * Overhead Stroke = A stroke striking the shuttlecock high above our head.
    * Punch Clear = An overhead Clear executed to just clear over the highest reach that can be met by our opponent.*
    * Push = A shot hit by a racket-head swung at constant velocity. A Doubles Low Service can be performed with a Push.
    * Service = The first stroke or shot played in a rally.
    * Shadow Badminton = A drill performed without using the shuttlecock.
    * Shot = How the shuttlecock travels. It describes the trajectory of the path taken by the shuttlecock.
    * Slice = A shot made when we hit the side of the cork of the shuttlecock. Slice Smash and Slice Dropshot are most common.
    * Sliced Flat Clear = A Punch Clear executed with spin to the shuttlecock; to slow it down quicker after passing over the receiver.
    * Sliced Smash = A smash by hitting at the side of the shuttlecock (to cause the feathers to rotate); causing it to dip down quicker.
    * Spinning Netplay = A shot played near the net to our opponent's Fore Court, creating the shuttlecock to spin (rotating) over the net.
    * Stick Smash = A Smash generated by the wrist with little arm movement involved.
    * Stroke = How a player executes a shot. It relates to our stroke production. It describes our body action.
    * Tactics = The art of arranging one's game-play, in order to win or gain an advantage over one's opponents.
    * Tumble = A shot played near the net to the our opponent's Fore Court, creating the shuttlecock to somersault once or more times over the net.
    * Wall Drill = Drill for perfecting our strokes by hitting against the wall.
    * Wood Shot = When the shuttlecock is struck by the frame of the racket-head. "Frame Shot" is now gradually replacing this term.
    * XD Push Shot = Pushing the shuttlecock to the Side Tram Lines; directing it to fall between the front and the back players.

    .

  2. #138
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Some badminton terms found here:
    http://www.worldbadminton.com/glossary.html

    Badminton Glossary

    Descriptions of many terms and expressions used in the sport of badminton.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Alley - extension of the court by 1-1/2 feet on both sides for doubles play
    Back Alley- Area between the back boundary line and the long service line for doubles.
    Backcourt- Back third of the court, in the area of the back boundary lines.
    Balk (Feint)- Any deceptive movement that disconcerts an opponent before or during the service.
    Baseline- Back boundary line at each end of the court, parallel to the net.
    Carry- An illegal tactic, also called a sling or a throw, in which the shuttle is caught and held on the racquet and then slung during the execution of a stroke.
    Center or Base Position- Location in the center of the court to which a singles player tries to return after each shot.
    Center Line- Line perpendicular to the net that separates the left and right service courts.
    Clear- A shot hit deep to the opponents back boundary line. The high clear is a defensive shot, while the flatter attacking clear is used offensively.
    Court- Area of play, as defined by the outer boundary lines.
    Drive- A fast and low shot that makes a horizontal flight over the net.
    Drop- A shot hit softly and with finesse to fall rapidly and close to the net on the opponent's side.
    Fault- A violation of the playing rules, either in serving, receiving, or during play.
    Feint (Balk)- Any deceptive movement that disconcerts an opponent before or during the service.
    Flick- A quick wrist and forearm rotation that surprises an opponent by changing an apparently soft shot into a faster passing one; used primarily on the serve and at the net.
    Forecourt- Front third of the court, between the net and the short service line.
    Hairpin Net Shot- Shot made from below and very close to the net with the shuttle rising, just clearing the net, and then dropping sharply down the other side. The shuttle's flight approximates the shape of a hairpin.
    Halfcourt Shot- A shot hit low and to midcourt, used effectively in doubles against the up-and-back formation.
    Kill- fast downward shot that cannot be returned; a "putaway".
    Let- A legitimate cessation of play to allow a rally to be replayed.
    Long Service Line- In singles, the back boundary line. In doubles a line 2-1/2 feet inside the back boundary line. The serve may not go past this line.
    Match- A series of games to determine a winner.
    Midcourt- The middle third of the court, halfway between the net and the back boundary line.
    Net Shot- Shot hit from the forecourt that just clears the net and then falls rapidly.
    Push Shot- Gentle shot played by pushing the shuttle with little wrist motion, usually from the net or midcourt to the opponent's midcourt.
    Racquet (Racket)- Instrument used by the player to hit the shuttlecock. Weight about 90 grams (3 oz). Length 680 mm (27 in). Made from metal alloys (steel/aluminum) or from ceramic, graphite or boron composites. Generally strung with synthetic strings or natural gut.
    Rally- Exchange of shots while the shuttle is in play.
    Serve (Service)- Stroke used to put the shuttlecock into play at the start of a rally.
    Service Court- Area into which the serve must be delivered. Different for singles and doubles play.
    Short Service Line- The line 6-1/2 feet from the net which a serve must reach to be legal.
    Shuttlecock (Shuttle)- Official name for the object that the players must hit. Composed of 16 goose feathers attached to a cork base covered with leather. Synthetic shuttles are also used by some.
    Smash- Hard-hit overhead shot that forces the shuttle sharply downward. Badminton's primary attacking stroke.
    Wood Shot- Shot that results when the base of the shuttle is hit by the frame of the racket. Once illegal, this shot was ruled acceptable by the International Badminton Federation in 1963.

    ================================================== =================

    I find the terms "bounce" and "dribble" used in chris-ccc's description rather out of place for badminton.

    If you try to bounce the shuttlecock, it implies that you are hitting it twice or more times which is a fault. Dribbling the bird is a delicate task that will most likely put you in trouble.

    A shuttlecock cannot be bounced up and down nor dribbled like a basketball or in a soccer game.

    I think the "Flick" serve is used more often than the "drive serve", but it can't be hit hard since one uses more of the wrist rather than the forearm and also to produce that element of surprise.

    The description of "clear" here seems to me to be clearer than an execution of a "Lob" or an underarm "Lift" from forecourt to the baseline.

    The inclusion of the lethal "Half-court" smash adds more ammunition to the shots.

    And of course the "Back Alley" does not mix with the normal tram-line "Alley".

    I always thought that "Tumble" is an unlikely shot that hits the net cord/tape before tumbling or somersaulting over to the other side of the net.
    Last edited by Loh; 04-07-2011 at 11:38 PM.

  3. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post

    I always thought that "Tumble" is an unlikely shot that hits the net cord/tape before tumbling or somersaulting over to the other side of the net.
    tumble is a spinning net shot.

  4. #140
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow More info about the difference between Spinning and Tumbling

    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    tumble is a spinning net shot.
    .
    We have added a little bit more to it. You can go back to Post #22 to read more about it.

    Basically, the difference is;
    * Spinning = The feathers are rotating or spinning
    * Tumbling = The shuttlecock is somersaulting or tumbling

    A Tumble with little spin will be tumbling faster; as the cork wants to point downwards quicker because of the gravitational effect.

    A Tumble with more spin will help the vertical axis of the cork to stay horizontal, inverted, lopsided, etc, ... longer.

    In other words, when the shuttlecock is tumbling while spinning, the gyroscopic effect comes into play; to maintain/hold its orientation longer.
    .

  5. #141
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Wood Shot - Shot that results when the base of the shuttle is hit by the frame of the racket. Once illegal, this shot was ruled acceptable by the International Badminton Federation in 1963.

    I think this term also relates to the old days when the racket frame was made of wood, like the brand "Dunlop/Maxply" which is heavier, unlike today. When you hit the wooden frame the shuttle can bounce off in an unexpected direction and can catch your opponent totally by surprise. It was once considered NOT a 'clean' hit, therefore a "fault". Not now anymore.

    I think similarly when the shuttle touches the net tape on its way to your opponent's court, it was once considered a fault or "re-serve" (let) depending on whether it landed on or beyond the short service line or not, like in table-tennis.

    Now, it is considered OK if it lands on or beyond the short service line.
    Last edited by Loh; 04-09-2011 at 10:24 AM.

  6. #142
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default The Wood Shot Abolished - Thanks to Dr Oon Chong Teck

    An interesting account of how the then Malayan medical student, Dr Oon initiated the proposal and finally won against the tide of European "colonial" politics:

    http://viweb.freehosting.net/OonCT.htm

    On the IBF Council

    In my final year in Cambridge in 1960, Teh Gin Sooi, the Secretary of the Badminton Association of Malaya, wrote to me appointing me the Malayan delegate to the International Badminton Federation meeting to be held that year in London. Malaya had proposed that the wood shot rule be abolished. The old rule had stated that any part of the racket frame hit by the shuttlecock was a fault. This was the first and not the last time I was to encounter European bureaucracy. It took me a long time to prepare and give my speech and although I had a standing ovation, the proposal was not passed. As I was already well known and respected in the badminton fraternity, I was elected as a council member.

    I found out that the voting system was very much loaded against the Asian countries. The President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer all had a vote. All the founder members, which consisted mainly of the European countries, Great Britain - conveniently split up into England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales with a vote each - had big votes. One vote was given for every 10 years of membership, and many of these European nations had been members for 30 to 40 years! One extra vote was given for participating in a Thomas cup or Uber cup competition. A country like England would have 6 votes while a new country like Indonesia 2 votes!

    Furthermore, no postal votes were allowed, and delegates had to be present to vote. Poor countries like the Philippines, Hong Kong and Ceylon could not afford to send any delegates and so could not vote. England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, France, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium usually all voted together to prevent this rule 14(h) from being changed. The western countries favoured this law because they felt that to play good badminton the shuttle must strike the centre of the racket. But Asians play so fast that they tend to wood shot more so the skilled Europeans could not retrieve it! Basically it was better for the sport to abolish rule 14(h) as ‘woods’ were so hard to detect and players often were penalized when a stroke sounded like a wood shot.

    Due to my persistence in fighting for abolition of rule 14(h) year after year, the opposing countries were very bored with my presence and I was not very popular since I was not one of them. Some of the opposing delegates, I found out, did not necessarily vote as instructed by their associations for many reasons and some countries requested the English secretary Mr Herbert Scheele, who was very pro-British and was not for the Asians, to find delegates for them!

    Being a council member of the International Badminton Federation was no fun, as the majority of the members were Europeans and they were very ‘colonial’ in their mentality, very arrogant, and tended to elect each other year after year. The few Asians who were there were the yes-men; they did not like opposition. Despite my studies and badminton commitment I fought very hard for the abolition of the wood shot. I even had a petition signed by the top English players but to no avail, as their representative to the IBF simply voted against it. Fortunately, I had the help of my family, especially my father, Oon Khye Beng who at that time had already retired to live in England. He did the secretarial work, and contacted all the members of the IBF that were neutral, so that they might come over to our side, as well as to convince those who were not for us. If e-mail had been available at that time it would have been a boon! We even made contact with the anti-apartheid African countries for their support, as well as the council of African Unity. Every year was a disappointment; we were always crushed!

    The big day came at the AGM of the IBF on July 2, 1963. At the meeting it appeared Malaya had to start all over again when the opposition found out that some of the countries that were supporting us were in arrears with their subscription and so would be barred from voting. Fortunately, I had enough money on me! So I straight away went across and paid all their arrears for them, even for a few years for some!! We needed a two thirds majority to have the wood shot rule changed. By the skin of our teeth we survived 60 votes for us, and 30 against - exactly the two thirds we needed! 26 countries had supported us while 8 were against. The report of this meeting appeared in The Straits Times of July 26, 1963, in which the BAM secretary, Teh Gin Sooi, said that "... Dr. Oon is to be congratulated for his yeoman service to the game and for his unflagging efforts to rally round the many nations to our side in the woodshot campaign...". This was my greatest victory in badminton, besides beating Tan Joe Hock the man responsible for the defeat of Malaya in the 1958 Thomas Cup later at the All-England and my most memorable contribution to the sport. The new rule has now stood the test of time for exactly 40 years - and a V.I. boy achieved it!! Players now enjoy the game more but most people today are not aware of how it was changed!

  7. #143
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Wood Shot (As per Post #66)

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    Wood Shot- Shot that results when the base of the shuttle is hit by the frame of the racket. Once illegal, this shot was ruled acceptable by the International Badminton Federation in 1963.
    .
    As per Post #66, Wood Shot = When the shuttlecock is struck by the frame of the racket-head. "Frame Shot" is now gradually replacing this term.

    BTW, not only the frame of the racket-head can be used legally to return the shuttlecock, but any part of the racket can be legal; be it the shaft or the handle.

    Soon we might have terms like; "Shaft Shot" and "Handle Shot".
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 05-10-2011 at 03:26 AM.

  8. #144
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    .
    As per Post #66, Wood Shot = When the shuttlecock is struck by the frame of the racket-head. "Frame Shot" is now gradually replacing this term.

    BTW, not only the frame of the racket-head can be used legally to return the shuttlecock, but any part of the racket can be legal; be it the shaft or the handle.

    Soon we might have terms like; "Shaft Shot" and "Handle Shot".
    .
    But don't stretch your luck too far and execute a "hand shot".

  9. #145
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up We have fun using the handle of the racket to hit/return the shuttlecock at Netplay

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    But don't stretch your luck too far and execute a "hand shot".
    .
    At our Coaching And Training Sessions, we do have fun using the handle of the racket to hit/return the shuttlecock (at Netplay).

    However, at any time when the shuttlecock touches our hand/fingers, a "Fault" shall be called.
    .

  10. #146
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    Default Dink Shot

    As a longtime USA racketball player and relative newcomer to badminton (about a year as of this writing) I am amazed that the dink shot has not been mentioned yet. This is all the more amazing to me because one of BC's most prolific members is DinkAlot.

    I assume he chose that screen name because he "dinks" a lot whenever he plays badminton. To me, a dink shot is the exact same as what has been called a "dribble" shot in this thread.

    One of my six kids, the tallest (6' 3" and 185 pounds) and most powerful hitter of my family, is also a frequent dinker. He can hit almost any reception of the shuttle with such power that you naturally position more rearward in the court to receive his smashes. But he is quick to sense that and will take advantage with either a half smash drop shot or an actual underhanded dink shot forcing you to race to the net to make a save.

    "Save", hey that's another term that could be added as meaning a desperation shot of any kind made solely to keep the shuttle in play no matter how poorly it lays up to your opponent. The only hope you have after most "save" type shots is that your opponent makes some major blunder in handling it.

    Anyway, the lesson I have learned is that a good dink shot is all the more valuable if you also have a big smash that you can employ anywhere on the court. Smashes and dinks are the yin and yang of badminton and all top players are good at both types of shots.

  11. #147
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    Hello,

    I was searching this thread for a stroke named "Pulled Shot". does anyone have come across this stroke? This is the term use by one coach here in Philippines who got trained in coaching in Denmark. This is executed in the rear court when the shuttle is low or waist level. Hope that someone can explain it more clearly. I believe this is more use by singles players especially when he/she is late to the Fh or bh side of the rear court.

  12. #148
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Dink Shot & Pulled Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by bsmith View Post
    As a longtime USA racketball player and relative newcomer to badminton (about a year as of this writing) I am amazed that the dink shot has not been mentioned yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by neavalmi0421 View Post
    I was searching this thread for a stroke named "Pulled Shot". does anyone have come across this stroke? This is the term use by one coach here in Philippines who got trained in coaching in Denmark. This is executed in the rear court when the shuttle is low or waist level. Hope that someone can explain it more clearly. I believe this is more use by singles players especially when he/she is late to the Fh or bh side of the rear court.
    .
    No, I haven't heard of the 'Dink Shot' and the 'Pulled Shot' before.

    Hope that BCers who know about these 2 shots would post here to enlighten us.
    .

  13. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by neavalmi0421 View Post
    I was searching this thread for a stroke named "Pulled Shot". ... in the rear court when the shuttle is low...
    You mean like in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFOY6MPBs48 at 11:33 (forehand) and again at 11:36 (backhand)? I haven't heard this name for it before; I think of it as a variation of the sliced drop shot.

  14. #150
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Question Dink Shot = Dropshot

    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    No, I haven't heard of the 'Dink Shot' before.
    .
    I have been told that the Dink Shot (a term used by Americans) is the Dropshot.

    We need knowledgeable American BCers to confirm if this is true.
    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexh View Post
    You mean like in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFOY6MPBs48 at 11:33 (forehand) and again at 11:36 (backhand)? I haven't heard this name for it before; I think of it as a variation of the sliced drop shot.
    Yes, the execution is correct and very similar to the coach demo, however the shuttle location in this video are shoulder height that's why they can be more like the sliced drop shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neavalmi0421 View Post
    Yes, the execution is correct and very similar to the coach demo, however the shuttle location in this video are shoulder height that's why they can be more like the sliced drop shot.
    As far as I can tell, you almost never see the pros play this shot at much below shoulder height. If the opponent's last shot was flat, they can intercept it midcourt rather than digging it out of the back corner. If the opponent's last shot was too high to intercept, then there's enough time to move back and take the shuttle before it drops too low.

    Of course for us mere mortals, we don't always move so quickly. If you're late getting to the back corner, my coach says you should bend your knees--you're still taking the shuttle at shoulder height, it's just that your shoulder height is lower!

  17. #153
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Lightbulb More terms used in Badminton?

    .
    I hope to learn more terms used in Badminton.

    To me terms are not just words, but about ideas how new strokes/footwork/etc, etc, ... are introduced into our sport.
    .

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