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  1. #1
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    Default Coaching : Best Approach for your Son

    One passion that most badminton coaches share is the continuous efforts poured in order to see the positive progress of whatever lessons that they've given to their students. Being a coach and a player myself, it always my ambition that one day, besides coaching my current students, i also can train my son, personally, until he can become a better player.

    My two grown daughter, due to their ultimate no interest in badminton causes me to unable to influence them to learn about badminton.........because they love to dance....well, can't blame them. Then the breakthrough came when i got a baby boy 7 years ago. So happy i was, every night and day, whenever he goes to sleep, i will put my badminton racket besides him. As he grows up and able to grasp, i ask him to hold the racket and don't mind being whack at the face. Every time i go to my coaching session, tournaments or friendly, I'll bring him. Then when he starts to learn to walk, i buy him a nice sport shoes and end up most of the time on the badminton court running with me.
    When he started to learn to speak and understand my conversation, i ask him mostly everyday " do you want daddy to teach you badminton?"...and i smile because the answer is always with a nod

    As he grows up, i started to train him personally, at the age of 5+. He learned fast. Now nearly a year at 6+ and if your son starts going for any coaching session, i noticed there are crucial things that need to be understood first for his benefit:

    - Be supportive. By being supportive can boost his moral and interest to learn more. This will accelerate his learning ability.
    - Be patient and slow on him. Badminton is a game of vast knowledge and delicate technical approach that require a lot of patient to absorb.
    - Safety. Make sure he wear his shoes properly with socks, warm up etc..
    - The best sparring partner..............is you. Regularly play with him.
    - Whatever failure he gain in games translated it into motivation...never blamed him.


  2. #2
    Regular Member lcleing's Avatar
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    Seem like you are having fun with your child. Good for you. Having daughters who loves to dance is cool too, you can join them sometimes and dance your heart out .

    Anyway, being supportive to kids at a young age is very important. This will simulate their interest to learn further.
    Teaching them proper basics, techniques and the footwork is very crucial at this stage as any wrong taught basics will be very hard to correct in the future especially to a kid who picked up the habit as young as 5.

    I agree with what you said. Being supportive is good since at this stage you focus around letting your kids have the most fun of badminton.

    At a later stage, it will depend very much on what both of you want from this sport:
    1. Do you want him to be a world beater?
    As age grows and when he is getting into his early teenage stage, you gonna be a bit stricter on the discipline side if you plan to mold him to become a world beater. He needs to understand that mental toughness, hard work and discipline are very important to succed in the international stage. At the same time you should also send him to other badminton academy to further improve his techniques(I believe you alone can never teach him everything in this sport) from other advanced coaches and let him expose to players with different playing styles and strategy.

    2. Do you want him to keep the sport as a hobby?
    If this is he case, then just continue to have fun I guess! Just make sure he won't point his finger at you and ask you:'why you didn't train me to be the next Lin Dan?' in the future.
    Last edited by lcleing; 08-30-2010 at 05:21 AM.

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    Regular Member lcleing's Avatar
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    Last edited by lcleing; 09-02-2010 at 04:13 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by lcleing View Post
    Seem like you are having fun with your child. Good for you. Having daughters who loves to dance is cool too, you can join them sometimes and dance your heart out .

    Anyway, being supportive to kids at a young age is very important. This will simulate their interest to learn further.
    Teaching them proper basics, techniques and the footwork is very crucial at this stage as any wrong taught basics will be very hard to correct in the future especially to a kid who picked up the habit as young as 5.

    I agree with what you said. Being supportive is good since at this stage you focus around letting your kids have the most fun of badminton.

    At a later stage, it will depend very much on what both of you want from this sport:
    1. Do you want him to be a world beater?
    As age grows and when he is getting into his early teenage stage, you gonna be a bit stricter on the discipline side if you plan to mold him to become a world beater. He needs to understand that mental toughness, hard work and discipline are very important to succed in the international stage. At the same time you should also send him to other badminton academy to further improve his techniques(I believe you alone can never teach him everything in this sport) from other advanced coaches and let him expose to players with different playing styles and strategy.

    2. Do you want him to keep the sport as a hobby?
    If this is he case, then just continue to have fun I guess! Just make sure he won't point his finger at you and ask you:'why you didn't train me to be the next Lin Dan?' in the future.
    Absolutely right icleing. When they're having fun of what they're doing, ultimately they are interested to learn more.............and then they can become the next Zhao Jian Hua.....but only without the similar height

  5. #5
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    Shooting stroke,

    I just came across this interesting article.

    My older daughter plays but not too motivated to play games. Easily disappointed at failures and then becomes a poor listener.

    Initially it was frustrating to see a poor learning attitude. In fact, I am not too concerned about the skills. I think a decent level of skill can come, if the learning attitude was better. With the help of another person, we have got the girl to have a better attitude. It's the attitude that is important. We are not asking to be an expert player but are asking to concentrate in the short period of time. I extrapolate this into a life learning principle for school:

    You can get results you want but:

    A) focus and concentrate in the time you have
    B) hard work always necessary
    C) listen to the teacher
    D) sometimes learning or remembering is not fun - but what is important is that you know you can overcome the obstacles given the right skill set.

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