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  1. #18
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    Originally posted by badrad
    that's too bad. $45 will go towards buying string supplies.

    My friend in Australia recently bought the Smart 909 from Eagnas. I think he dealt directly with Taiwan, the order was shipped from there. It took a month for delivery by sea, and when it arrived, it was missing some critical bolts and securing hardware. Although they promptly mailed out a replacement set for the missing hardware, my friend wound up having to go to local hardware store to obtain the missing pieces. If not he probably would have had to wait another two or three weeks until these other pieces finally arrive.

    He did some string jobs, and sent me two Ashaways with his string worksmanship. Impressive, tight - but we have a discrepancy in tension. He says he strung at 22/23, and I and few others felt it more like 26. Pete_lsd, WWC and Marky got a chance to see and hit with the Ashaway (TMP990) which is a dead knockoff of the MP99.
    That's the biggest concern with buying overseas. Good luck getting replacement parts if there is a problem. Kinda surprised that the tension is not on, considering the price of the machine.

  2. #19
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    Originally posted by badrad
    That's good deal from CP. How will you handle the max weight problem?
    Just got an email back from maxline and they can send the easy-3 by parcel post for $10 more. I am still leaning towards the flex740. I think I will buy that one if they can send it by post as well.

  3. #20
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    noticed the price discount for the flex 740. that's a better deal than the easy3. also the 6 point suspension works quite well, it is identical to the smart series.

  4. #21
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    Originally posted by badrad
    noticed the price discount for the flex 740. that's a better deal than the easy3. also the 6 point suspension works quite well, it is identical to the smart series.
    It's actually not that much of a difference. The flex comes with the tennis clamps, so you need to buy the badminton clamps. The cheap ones are $18 each. They are diamond coated aluminum clamps. I don't think the ones made for tennis will work on badminton rackets. So when you add $229 to $36 then it's only $24 difference. Now the easy-3 uses a crank but only has 1 fixed clamp. The question now is, 2 fixed clamps vs 1, drop weight vs crank (which will be faster, I guess) and the ability to do tennis rackets (no plans). The 6-point clamping system on the easy-3 seems more secure. And I do like the 2 fixed clamps. There are pros and cons to both machines.
    Any thoughts?

  5. #22
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    Hi, sorry to barge in on your conversation. I have an Eagnas ST-200 which was upgraded to an Easy3. I have noted the following 2 problems. Some of it may be technique, but at least part of the problems are design problems.

    1. The single fixed clamp does a better job than 2 Yonex flying clamps at holding the tension. As a result, the side I use the fixed clamp on ends up with higher tension than the side I use the flying clamps as judged by the note of the strings when plucked.

    2. The clamps for holding down the racket have a habit of loosening during stringing, no matter how much I tighten them.

    The 2nd problem is particularly irritating. Does anyone else who use this machine has the same problem?


  6. #23
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    Originally posted by AKFT
    Hi, sorry to barge in on your conversation. I have an Eagnas ST-200 which was upgraded to an Easy3. I have noted the following 2 problems. Some of it may be technique, but at least part of the problems are design problems.

    1. The single fixed clamp does a better job than 2 Yonex flying clamps at holding the tension. As a result, the side I use the fixed clamp on ends up with higher tension than the side I use the flying clamps as judged by the note of the strings when plucked.

    2. The clamps for holding down the racket have a habit of loosening during stringing, no matter how much I tighten them.

    The 2nd problem is particularly irritating. Does anyone else who use this machine has the same problem?

    So you think I'll be better off with the flex740 with the 2 fixed clamps? The air suspension system with the k-clamps I guess will tighten itself down to the bed of the machine when tensioning the mains which will try to force the racket frame wider? I read in another board that someone was getting inconsistent tensions from the flex740 on each pull. That's kinda scary. Now I'm even more confused :-( I thought that a drop weight machine would be just about foolproof becase it is so simple in construction.

  7. #24
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    Originally posted by ryeung
    So you think I'll be better off with the flex740 with the 2 fixed clamps? The air suspension system with the k-clamps I guess will tighten itself down to the bed of the machine when tensioning the mains which will try to force the racket frame wider? I read in another board that someone was getting inconsistent tensions from the flex740 on each pull. That's kinda scary. Now I'm even more confused :-( I thought that a drop weight machine would be just about foolproof becase it is so simple in construction.
    didn't notice the discount price did not include badminton clamps. I would think though if you don't plan on doing tennis, you could probably get them to put in badminton clamps instead. That's what I did when I ordered my older unit years ago, they just swapped the clamps.
    In general fixed clamps will be more secure over floating clamps. I'm not totally sold on just the one float/one fixed.
    the suspension method rather than clamps(bolts) provides a surer hold, and less prone to mechanical loosening. On my unit, if I did not properly install the racquet and secure, the bolts will loosen, creating problems.
    As for drop weight, not sure why the post prior would indicate difference in pulling tensions. The only discrepancies with drop weight are usually at the hands of the operator (weight not resting horizontal).

  8. #25
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    oh, there is another reason for discrepancy in pull tension differences - racquet head position changes during the pull. when you are about to pull you do need to make sure the pulling is aligned to the tension. In some cases, this might not always be possible due to the position of the grommet. If your unit has a clutch or brake to prevent movement of the racquet head during the pull, it should remain constant. If the head is not secured during the pull, the racquet could shift slighly giving incorrect tension. Not a big deal, but just means you have to re-pull that string.

  9. #26
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    Originally posted by badrad
    oh, there is another reason for discrepancy in pull tension differences - racquet head position changes during the pull. when you are about to pull you do need to make sure the pulling is aligned to the tension. In some cases, this might not always be possible due to the position of the grommet. If your unit has a clutch or brake to prevent movement of the racquet head during the pull, it should remain constant. If the head is not secured during the pull, the racquet could shift slighly giving incorrect tension. Not a big deal, but just means you have to re-pull that string.
    I got this from another board. It is a tennis board but this should apply to badminton as well. In fact if it's a friction problem, it will be worse with the lighter weight. I really can't see how you can have so much friction to cause a problem, unless the bold holding the weight bar to the frame is way too tight. I thought that you weren't supposed to drop the weight but rather to just let it down. I can see dropping the weight to really cause problems.



    From talk.tennis-warehouse.com ....


    My Flex-740 is very, very inconsistent.

    I think itís a friction problem. The tension arm on my old stringer (Klippermate) didnít actually touch the support it was mounted to, but this one does. There is a washer between the wheel of the tensioning arm and the support.

    When the arm drops it doesnít ďbobbleĒ when it runs out of slack the way the Klippermate does. It just stops, like itís sticking.

    So I tested it with a calibrator and am not happy with the results. If I lower the arm very, very slowly, supporting it all the way I get somewhat consistant results (albeit 5lbs over the selected tension) If I let the arm drop by itself (from 45degrees, just like I used to do, and just like the Eagnas manual says) I can be anywhere from3lbs to 10lbs over the selected tension.

    Is this a problem with Eagnas stringers in general, or just mine? Iím really surprised that a dropweight stringer would be so inconsistent.

    Itís disappointing because I think the rest of the machine is top flight, but if Iím not confident in the tension, Iím not going to be confident in the string job.

  10. #27
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    Originally posted by ryeung
    I got this from another board. It is a tennis board but this should apply to badminton as well. In fact if it's a friction problem, it will be worse with the lighter weight. I really can't see how you can have so much friction to cause a problem, unless the bold holding the weight bar to the frame is way too tight. I thought that you weren't supposed to drop the weight but rather to just let it down. I can see dropping the weight to really cause problems.



    From talk.tennis-warehouse.com ....


    My Flex-740 is very, very inconsistent.

    I think itís a friction problem. The tension arm on my old stringer (Klippermate) didnít actually touch the support it was mounted to, but this one does. There is a washer between the wheel of the tensioning arm and the support.

    When the arm drops it doesnít ďbobbleĒ when it runs out of slack the way the Klippermate does. It just stops, like itís sticking.

    So I tested it with a calibrator and am not happy with the results. If I lower the arm very, very slowly, supporting it all the way I get somewhat consistant results (albeit 5lbs over the selected tension) If I let the arm drop by itself (from 45degrees, just like I used to do, and just like the Eagnas manual says) I can be anywhere from3lbs to 10lbs over the selected tension.

    Is this a problem with Eagnas stringers in general, or just mine? Iím really surprised that a dropweight stringer would be so inconsistent.

    Itís disappointing because I think the rest of the machine is top flight, but if Iím not confident in the tension, Iím not going to be confident in the string job.
    The weight is supported or cradled by your hand on the way down. Not dropped or completely let go. You will naturally want to keep your hand in the area anyways, in case the string (god forbid) should snap, the weight arm will slam down onto your table or side of the unit. I've had that happen a few times with crappy string.

    The friction problem could be from dust, rust, wear, parts seizing, and otherwise lack of lubrication.

    keeping a cover over the unit, or storing it in a carry bag or box helps. sometimes the unit may be put in a cold part of the basement, which could cause rusting or other moisture related problems.

    Although there were no instructions for my unit, the construction of the drop arm assembly is simple enough. There is one main bolt to remove, but the disasembly requires a bit of manipulation to keep the spring in place. The spring was used to keep the drop weight pulling only in one direction, restricting backwards movement.

    In the lifetime of the unit, I have dissassemble it three times to replace washers, and lubricate the assembly. Takes around an hour each time.
    Last edited by badrad; 02-20-2003 at 01:52 AM.

  11. #28
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    Originally posted by badrad
    oh, there is another reason for discrepancy in pull tension differences - racquet head position changes during the pull. when you are about to pull you do need to make sure the pulling is aligned to the tension. In some cases, this might not always be possible due to the position of the grommet. If your unit has a clutch or brake to prevent movement of the racquet head during the pull, it should remain constant. If the head is not secured during the pull, the racquet could shift slighly giving incorrect tension. Not a big deal, but just means you have to re-pull that string.
    Brake... aha ! Thought this device on my stringing machine (crank) was for transport purposes only..
    But i don't get it why the racket head should move during the pull, apart from the 'initial pulling phase'
    On my crank machine, i define that phase as pulling very slowly ...and when the racket head moves, wait... until the racket head has moved itself to the most optimal position.
    From there, i continue pulling. In that second phase, i never experience racket head movement. Can't imagine that the movement of the rackethead in the initial phase causes incorrect tension.
    Sometimes, the racket head moves slightly while i'm securing the fixed clamp too roughly, giving incorrect tension. I will try using the brake for that purpose.

    Maybe offtopic, but often it is said that the constant pull, appropriate for dropweight and electronical machines, is so much better than pulling with a crank machine.
    I think with technique, this factor can be minimized by pulling slowly on a crank machine and, from experience, know the point where the 'click' is gonna settle the tension. Just before the click, wait a little so the string can stretch.
    With drop-weight, the weight is first supported with a hand and then reaches the, ok, '100%' correct pull, but nobody is going to drink a cup of coffee between every pull and clamping down the string.
    Just my thoughts

  12. #29
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    Originally posted by Yong
    Brake... aha ! Thought this device on my stringing machine (crank) was for transport purposes only..
    But i don't get it why the racket head should move during the pull, apart from the 'initial pulling phase'
    On my crank machine, i define that phase as pulling very slowly ...and when the racket head moves, wait... until the racket head has moved itself to the most optimal position.
    From there, i continue pulling. In that second phase, i never experience racket head movement. Can't imagine that the movement of the rackethead in the initial phase causes incorrect tension.
    Sometimes, the racket head moves slightly while i'm securing the fixed clamp too roughly, giving incorrect tension. I will try using the brake for that purpose.

    Maybe offtopic, but often it is said that the constant pull, appropriate for dropweight and electronical machines, is so much better than pulling with a crank machine.
    I think with technique, this factor can be minimized by pulling slowly on a crank machine and, from experience, know the point where the 'click' is gonna settle the tension. Just before the click, wait a little so the string can stretch.
    With drop-weight, the weight is first supported with a hand and then reaches the, ok, '100%' correct pull, but nobody is going to drink a cup of coffee between every pull and clamping down the string.
    Just my thoughts
    I thought that the brake is only used to help in tying knots. Are you not supposed to leave the machine free to pivot when you are stringing?

  13. #30
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by ryeung
    I thought that the brake is only used to help in tying knots. Are you not supposed to leave the machine free to pivot when you are stringing?
    You can leave the racquet head free to rotate while you are pulling. But because the head is oval and the grommets are not totally in-line with the string and pulling direction, the racquet head could further rotate as you continue the pull. True it will rest at an equilibrium point that it finds during the initial pulling, but as the tension increases, and as you are moving around the racquet (ie. getting the string clamps on) a slight knock could cause the racquet to move finding another equilibrium point from the tension.
    The brake helps it stay in position so you do not lose tension, or have the racqeut move, which could even cause injury if you are not cautious.
    Now, most portables dont' have too much of a brake, some is a simple twist screw. That is more of a nuisance so, allowing it to free rotate is easier. When I was using my older drop weight I never bothered using that just because it is a pain to use.
    with the Prince, the brake is easier to use, but I also only use it during corner pulls where there is the chance the racquet could continue to move.

  14. #31
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by badrad
    Originally posted by ryeung
    I thought that the brake is only used to help in tying knots. Are you not supposed to leave the machine free to pivot when you are stringing?
    You can leave the racquet head free to rotate while you are pulling. But because the head is oval and the grommets are not totally in-line with the string and pulling direction, the racquet head could further rotate as you continue the pull. True it will rest at an equilibrium point that it finds during the initial pulling, but as the tension increases, and as you are moving around the racquet (ie. getting the string clamps on) a slight knock could cause the racquet to move finding another equilibrium point from the tension.
    The brake helps it stay in position so you do not lose tension, or have the racqeut move, which could even cause injury if you are not cautious.
    Now, most portables dont' have too much of a brake, some is a simple twist screw. That is more of a nuisance so, allowing it to free rotate is easier. When I was using my older drop weight I never bothered using that just because it is a pain to use.
    with the Prince, the brake is easier to use, but I also only use it during corner pulls where there is the chance the racquet could continue to move.
    Well I ordered the flex740 today. They said they have it in stock and will be mailing it today or tomorrow. And they will exchange the tennis clamps for the badminton clamps. Just have to wait and see what their service is going to be like.

  15. #32
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    Default Flex740

    Ryeung,

    Let us know how the flex740 performs.

    I used to restring my racket by hand using a small device (much like a car jack) which I learned from a master stringer back in Malaysia. It is very convenience consider if you are going to tournament where there is no stringer around to fix your favourite racket to the precise tension that you want. It does take me a while to master the technique which include listening to the sound of the strings.

    I also have one of those stationary stringing machine (2 points) which was made during the 60s - drop weight, foot operated type, which is kind of common in Malaysia during those days. It is heavy but needs little maintenance other than some lubrication. It can string tennis,s quash and badminton rackets.

    Between the two (hand vs machine), I like the hand approach due to its convenience and portability. May be this is beacuse I started playing badminton using wood rackets which is kind of easy to string by hand when comparing to newer rackets such as graphite, titanium etc. I still play with Cab8 and wooden rackets occasionaly in local club.

    By the way, I really like this forum because it provides me with valuable tips on stringing badminton rackets (different made, type, strings etc).

    Have fun stringing!

  16. #33
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    Default Re: Flex740

    Originally posted by lengtai
    Ryeung,

    Let us know how the flex740 performs.

    I used to restring my racket by hand using a small device (much like a car jack) which I learned from a master stringer back in Malaysia. It is very convenience consider if you are going to tournament where there is no stringer around to fix your favourite racket to the precise tension that you want. It does take me a while to master the technique which include listening to the sound of the strings.

    I also have one of those stationary stringing machine (2 points) which was made during the 60s - drop weight, foot operated type, which is kind of common in Malaysia during those days. It is heavy but needs little maintenance other than some lubrication. It can string tennis,s quash and badminton rackets.

    Between the two (hand vs machine), I like the hand approach due to its convenience and portability. May be this is beacuse I started playing badminton using wood rackets which is kind of easy to string by hand when comparing to newer rackets such as graphite, titanium etc. I still play with Cab8 and wooden rackets occasionaly in local club.

    By the way, I really like this forum because it provides me with valuable tips on stringing badminton rackets (different made, type, strings etc).

    Have fun stringing!
    It'll be a little while before I can comment about this machine since I've never strung a racket before.

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