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  1. #1
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    Default The Art of Badminton Deception - Hold and Hit

    Performing a well executed deception can be used both as a useful strategy and part of your several "shots bank" that can give you the winning edge while playing. As valid as executing other shots such as a smash or drops, it also makes how we see badminton beautifully played since it a technical skills that is an art by itself.

    In regards with the way we play badminton now, which emphasize on speed and power, there are still place for deception since the millisecond of breathing space produced while executing it can be part of the preparation as a winner and theoretically it should be part of the coaching module. So can deception be coached?

    The answer is yes but its not easy. Before coaching a player to execute the correct technique about deception, that player must understand first on how to execute all the full range of normal shots using the correct technique. The other important ingredient to successfully execute a deception is to have a fair degree of forearm and wrist strength since they are used ultimately to energize for the late arrival of the racket head to the shuttle upon hitting it. Your eyes also needs to be very sharp and always alert so that you can have a clear vision and awareness on how you move your racket in refer to where is your opponent positioned in order to properly coordinate the next hit in ensuring the deception is a well executed one.

    As long as badminton has exist, the types of deception also has evolved since it is part of the badminton evolution. Therefore, there are a lot of deceptions available now and only "your fantasy" can be the limit to what available types of deception that can possibly exist. Personally, i have a lot of type of deception under my belt and frankly speaking, I've used them quite often and it helps me a lot as part of my winning edge in numbers of tournament. I've coached them also to my students as part of the advance modul in the coaching program and i can see its psychological advantage and positive breakthrough on how they are playing and i want to share this knowledge to you.

    Teaching deception theoretically using words and sentences is not easy since, it is the applied technical part that will give the full effect on how the correct technique should be executed. Therefore, by having the correct knowledge, continously practice on perfecting the technique so that it can eventually be executed correctly. Learning deception is one thing but perfecting it require full dedication and concentration because it is an art that you cannot master overnight.

    Deception 1 - Hold and Hit

    1. Intro

    Arguably among the most common deception used, the hold and hit type deception can be a lethal maneuver by itself if executed well. The "hit" portion can either end as a flick or net (if you're retrieving the shuttlecock as a net play) or a drive or drop (if you're retrieving the shuttlecock as a drive shot) depends on where your opponents reacts and moves. Its the combination of both "hold", that makes your opponent mind thinks it is going to be hit at that particular shot hence reacts to it and the "hit" portion where the direction of the shuttlecock upon hitting it will go to the opposite direction that act as a deceptive moves that eventually leaves your opponent stranded. One recent maneuver was performed by Peter Gade yesterday against a Japanese player, Yamada in this year WC.

    2. Type

    The "hold" and "hit" deception has two type of maneuver, the back swing follow through and no back swing follow through. These two different type exist because it is referring to the different technique applied in its "hold" component. This thread will only concentrate on teaching the "back swing follow through" "hold" and "hit" type of deception since this is the most difficult and among the most deceptive shot available.

    3. "Hold" and " Hit" - The back swing follow through

    3.1 Components

    The differences between the back swing follow through and no back swing follow through is at its "hold" component since it requires for the player to extend the forearm as like retrieving the shots but then, there are no immediate "contact/hit" perform yet. This is because the player needs to do a reverse movements or back swing of his forearm as to allow a synchronize movements backwards of the racket head in refer to the shuttlecock to create a time frame delay before hitting the shuttlecock at the last possible moments. The no back swing follow through will have minimal or no back swing movement and the time frame delay will be more shorter.

    3.2 Technique

    This deception has 4 phase which include preparation, the hold phase - retrieving, the hold phase - back swing follow through and finally the hit phase. Below is the diagram of all the phases and the explanation on what are techniques to executed them.

    Name:  Art of Badminton Deception - Hold and Hit.jpg
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    a. Preparation

    - Always hold the racket head level high. By doing this, you can address/retrieve the shuttlecock earlier and to make enough room for your forearm to extend.

    b. Hold - Retrieving

    - Extend your forearm as like your going to address the shuttlecock to hit it but don't hit it yet. The earlier you address is better since it will make more room for you to perform a back swing later.

    * As mention earlier, it is important also at this point to be clearly aware where is your opponent positioned.

    c. Hold - back swing follow through

    * This is the most tricky part as you need to have a good coordination to synchronize the forearm back swing movement with the shuttlecock travel trajectory together with the split second awareness where is your opponents position and his movements.

    - Do a reverse movement of your forearm/a back swing of your racket and synchronize its movement together with the speed and direction of the shuttlecock . This back swing action together with the shuttlecock movement and the wait to hit the shuttlecock until the last moment will in fact create the delay.
    - At the same time, coordinate this movement together with a clear awareness on where is your opponent moves.
    - The deceptive moves depends hugely on the amount of delay performed. The more room in performing a back swing will results in a more longer delay to hit the shuttle thus making your opponents clueless to where your going to hit it and at the same time will give you enough time to observe his reaction towards how you address the shuttlecock. This is why you need to address the shuttlecock earlier.

    d. The Hit

    - Once your opponent has react on how you address the shuttlecock and at the same time, you are also clearly aware where is your opponent moves, then at this last moment, you hit the shuttlecock to any opposite direction leaving your opponent possibly stranded.

    Hopes this is useful and may the deception force be with you.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by London_Player View Post
    Any video clips would be better, if available.
    This a good example of a hold and hit video. Observe closely that:




    - The racket level is high so he can address the shuttlecock earlier to allow him to make
    enough room to make the back swing / reverse movement of his forearm
    - The hold component that is the back swing follow through is done by
    synchronizing the racket head movement with the direction of the shuttlecock trajectory
    - The hit component end as a deceptive forehand cross court net.

  3. #3
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    excellent guide, albeit a bit dense and imposing.

    To offer my own two cents, while the hold-backswing-hit shot can be more deceptive, the simple hold and hit shot is much more useful and can be applied to many more aspects of your game. The same principles apply, preparing early in a neutral position - the difficulty lies in having the full range of shots open to you in that neutral position. The same principle applies, except instead of moving your racquet back you simply wait for the bird to be a centimeter away from your strings before initiating the motion. By waiting that long in the "neutral" position before starting your motion you can often trick players just as easily as if you did a backswing-hit.

    A backswing with the intent to "fake" your opponent in this sense will often be done incorrectly - a newer player favoring a certain motion for a deceptive crosscourt net as opposed to a deceptive straight net. That, in addition to backswinging at all which gives your opponent more time to be prepared for your shot in the middle of a pace-induced (or as commentators often like to put it "injected") rally, makes it a shot that might often fail to gain you any advantage, and indeed might lose you at upper hand in dictating the pace that allowed you to attempt such a shot. Of course there are spectacular example of it working and causing an outright winner, such as lindan's oft-used crosscourt lift from his forehand net or peter gade's similar shot on his backhand net, but those appear less often than winners produced the other way. Also, the "waiting till the last moment before hitting" can be applied to overhead strokes as well, though having the exact same motion up till when your strings are 1cm away from the bird in your overhead swing is a intensely difficult task.

    Regardless, your explanation of the backswing-hit deception is very accurate and insightful for new players - I'm simply advocating the other kind of deceptive shot that you chose not to cover in your guide. Great contribution!

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    Quote Originally Posted by t3tsubo View Post
    excellent guide, albeit a bit dense and imposing.

    To offer my own two cents, while the hold-backswing-hit shot can be more deceptive, the simple hold and hit shot is much more useful and can be applied to many more aspects of your game. The same principles apply, preparing early in a neutral position - the difficulty lies in having the full range of shots open to you in that neutral position. The same principle applies, except instead of moving your racquet back you simply wait for the bird to be a centimeter away from your strings before initiating the motion. By waiting that long in the "neutral" position before starting your motion you can often trick players just as easily as if you did a backswing-hit.

    A backswing with the intent to "fake" your opponent in this sense will often be done incorrectly - a newer player favoring a certain motion for a deceptive crosscourt net as opposed to a deceptive straight net. That, in addition to backswinging at all which gives your opponent more time to be prepared for your shot in the middle of a pace-induced (or as commentators often like to put it "injected") rally, makes it a shot that might often fail to gain you any advantage, and indeed might lose you at upper hand in dictating the pace that allowed you to attempt such a shot. Of course there are spectacular example of it working and causing an outright winner, such as lindan's oft-used crosscourt lift from his forehand net or peter gade's similar shot on his backhand net, but those appear less often than winners produced the other way. Also, the "waiting till the last moment before hitting" can be applied to overhead strokes as well, though having the exact same motion up till when your strings are 1cm away from the bird in your overhead swing is a intensely difficult task.

    Regardless, your explanation of the backswing-hit deception is very accurate and insightful for new players - I'm simply advocating the other kind of deceptive shot that you chose not to cover in your guide. Great contribution!
    Excellent. Your explanation about the the simple hold and hit deception ( no back swing follow through ) can't be explained more better in a concise and informative approach. Combined with the above hold and hit deception ( back swing follow through ), i assume it covers the Hold and Hit deception topics completely.

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