User Tag List

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 52 to 68 of 72
  1. #52
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    And so the noose tightens...

    http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/10/10...nce-armstrong/... T

    The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency saysWednesday more than 1,000detailing the involvement of cyclist Lance Armstrong in what the agency calls “the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.”Armstrong, who won an unprecedented seven Tour de France titles, announced in August that he would no longer fight doping charges that the USADA brought against him earlier in the year. The famed cyclist’s decision prompted the USADA to ban the 40-year-old athlete from competition and strip him of his wins there though 1998, to datingwhether the organization had the authority to take such action.The USADA filed doping charges against Armstrong in June. Armstrong retired from professional cycling in February 2011, though he continued to compete in triathlon events.The USADA, a quasi-government agency recognized as the official anti-doping agency for Olympic, Pan American and Paralympic sports in the United States, accused Armstrong of using, possessing, trafficking and giving to others performance-enhancing drugs, as well as covering up doping violations.Armstrong’s attorney blasted“wrong” and “baseless,” much like Armstrongvehemently denied other such claims in the past.Armstrong, when he announced in August that he wouldn’t fight the charges, said there wasphysical evidence” to support the USADA’s claims, and that he was “finished with this nonsense” of fighting after charges fightingallegations for years.“The only physical evidence there is the hundreds of controls I have passed with flying colors,” Armstrong said in August. “I made myself available around the clock and around the world. In-competition. Out of competition. Blood. Urine. Whatever they asked for I provided. What is the point of all this testing if, in the end, USADA will not stand by it?” Armstrong’s Wednesday,OnHincape admitted he used banned substances.“It is extremely difficult today to acknowledge that during a part of my career I used banned substances,” Hincape said in a statement. “Early in my professional me to clear became it career,widespread use of performance enhancing drugs by cyclists at the top of the profession,possible to compete at the highest level without them. I deeply regret that choice and sincerely apologize to my family, teammates and fans.”

  2. #53
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Canada, BC, Burnaby
    Posts
    763
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Looking pretty guilty

  3. #54
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    US
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  4. #55
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    icy cold place
    Posts
    3,778
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    There is 2 parts to Lance. One is he was the best cheater (won 7) than the rest of the cheaters in his sport. The other part is for for his contribution to humanity - raising $500M for cancer, fighting 3 forms of rare cancer as giving hope to cancer patients. i like to remember him for the latter part, how many sport personality has done that?.
    IMO, Lance could possibly win a few of his 7 triumphs without doping, but to continue at the top he resorted to dopes, prevalent among money sportsperson these days.

  5. #56
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OneToughBirdie View Post
    There is 2 parts to Lance. One is he was the best cheater (won 7) than the rest of the cheaters in his sport. The other part is for for his contribution to humanity - raising $500M for cancer, fighting 3 forms of rare cancer as giving hope to cancer patients. i like to remember him for the latter part, how many sport personality has done that?.IMO, Lance could possibly win a few of his 7 triumphs without doping, but to continue at the top he resorted to dopes, prevalent among money sportsperson these days.
    True. But he'll be forever known as the last one who refused to confess and face the music. His pride is his flaw and in the court of public opinion, he will be the loser whereas his other sorry riders will at least be partially forgiven.

    Of the Livestrong foundation, you can bet he will be a sore liability for them from now on and you'll never see him publicly represent them again.
    Last edited by visor; 10-12-2012 at 03:30 PM.

  6. #57
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    And as Nike dumps Armstrong so begins the exodus of supporters. Wisely he leaves the Livestrong Foundation to spare them his infamy. ...

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...02343fffacd.21

  7. #58
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,474
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Guess he'll have to live off the millions he made before.

  8. #59
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Perjury charges and jail time may be on the horizon for Armstrong a lŗ Marion Jones.

    http://www.3news.co.nz/Lance-Armstro...0/Default.aspx

  9. #60
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    So now that he's been officially stripped of all his wins, the psychoanalysis begins...

    Not that I'm interested in cycling, but I like understanding what makes exceptional people tick... and perhaps I like to indulge in a bit of schadenfreude...

    http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/cyc...-1226502263030


    A LEADING Australian expert on emotional intelligence believes Lance Armstrong is a classic "corporate psychopath" who has hustled and bullied his way to the top his whole life.


    According to Sydney-based lecturer and author Chris Golis, the characteristics of a corporate psychopath are their charm, their lack of natural empathy, their ability to deceive and their view that life is a game with winners and losers – and that they are winners.

    “Typically they are manipulative, lack ethics, desire power and are very active players in corporate politics,” Mr Golis explains.

    “They meet someone and they say, ‘what’s in it for me? How can I make money from this person?’”

    Mr Golis says well known examples of the character type in the corporate sphere include businessman Alan Bond and the late Sydney stockbroker Rene Rivkin. But he says top sportsmen often exhibit the characteristics too, and Lance Armstrong appears to fall smack bang into the category.

    “Corporate psychopaths have a phenomenal desire to win or to make money and the two often go together, of course.

    “Obviously Lance had an incredibly strong desire to win bike races, but he also very much has the desire to make money through the deals he signed left, right and centre.”

    Mr Golis says corporate psychopaths are not all bad. “They’re wonderful rogues and fantastic company. They’re hustlers, they’re the ones who get deals done and the world would be more dull without them.

    “The problem is, many of them have no moral compass.”

    Many people are now asking whether Armstrong has actually come to believe the lies he has repeated so frequently and convincingly over the years.

    Chris Golis doesn’t think so. He believes Armstrong likely knows he’s lying, but that he has justified those lies to himself and simply can’t bring himself to back down.

    “People like Lance Armstrong divide the world into winners and losers. Then when someone raises doubts, they reconcile their actions internally by saying ‘yeah, I’m doing that but that’s what we winners have to do.”

    If there’s one piece of good news for Armstrong, it’s that corporate psychopaths can mellow as they get older.

    “It can happen,” Chris Golis says. “You do get these people suddenly working hard and becoming benefactors. By the time Lance is 60 I would say yeah, he may able to show some remorse.”

  10. #61
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Interesting "apology" for Lance...

    http://sports.nationalpost.com/2012/...ll-never-give/

    The apology Lance Armstrong will never give

    Hello, everybody, and thanks for coming today. I know a lot of you never thought I would do this. Well, I never thought I would do this, either.
    My name is Lance Armstrong, and I love cycling. When I was young my anger and desire would overwhelm me when I competed, a blinding rage, and I could barely control it. I had a rough childhood, and cycling was my escape. I was a triathlon champion as a teenager, and I was the world road race champion at 21, and I came to Europe and watched Miguel Indurain pedal away from me like I was a kid. That was the 1994 Tour de France. He kicked my ass.
    Then everybody started to kick my ass. EPO came in, and guys were so much stronger, so much faster. I could win one-day races, but I wasnít the greatest climber, and I had to withdraw in three of my first four attempts at the Tour; the other time, I finished 36th. I wanted to be great, so I faced the same decision every other cyclist in the last 15 years faced: you dope, or you get dropped. That was the choice. Itís like my former friend Levi Leipheimer put it: this sport breaks your heart, bit by bit.
    Well, I donít regret my decision the way those other guys did. I needed to be the best, and you couldnít be the best and be clean in this sport. So I doped. And after I beat cancer I needed cycling more than ever, so I kept going. I doped better than anybody ó I got better information, I got the best doctors, I pushed the envelope even though EPO killed a bunch of pro cyclists in the 1980s and 1990s. There was no other way. I built a machine to take on pro cycling, and I destroyed fields full of guys who were as dirty as I was. I donít apologize for that.
    Iím sorry I had to dope to be great, but this problem didnít start with me, and didnít end with me. So while I accept my lifetime ban, I call on the UCI and WADA and the USADA to agree to a one-time truth and reconciliation commission, to allow other riders to tell the truth without fear of repercussions. The sport created us; the sport needs to let us talk about it.
    That being said, there are some things Iím sorry for. Iím sorry I ran Christophe Bassons, one of the sportís truly noble men, out of the Tour in 1999 for daring to say that you couldnít reach a top 10 at the Tour without doping. Iím sorry for attacking Frankie and Betsy Andreu for being in the hospital room with me in 1996 when I admitted to the doctors that I had used EPO, testosterone, growth hormone, cortisone and steroids. Iím sorry I sued our former soigneur, Emma OíReilly, who wouldnít back down from the truth. Iím sorry I called her a prostitute, and a drunk.

    Iím sorry for attacking journalists like David Walsh and Paul Kimmage, who is still being sued by the UCI in what is as unconscionable a lawsuit as even Iíve ever seen. Iím sorry I told Christian Vande Velde to dope or get dropped from the team, and Iím sorry I allowed David Zabriskie to dope, because he got into cycling to escape his drug-addict father, the way I used it to pedal away from my absent father and my abusive stepfather and the emptiness of Plano, Texas. Iím sorry David broke down and cried the night he agreed to go against everything he believed in.


    Iím sorry for sending a text message to Levi Leipheimerís wife Odessa after I found out he was testifying that said, ďRun, donít walk.Ē Iím sorry I threatened to blackmail Greg LeMond. Iím sorry for painting Floyd Landis as an unbalanced lunatic, and for telling Tyler Hamilton in an Aspen restaurant that I would make his life a living hell. Iím sorry that the International Cycling Union is so warped that its president, Pat McQuaid, called Landis and Hamilton ďscumbagsĒ on Monday. Iím sorry he was following my lead.
    Iím sorry I lied so many times, and that I used cancer as a shield, and to make money. Iím sorry I said stuff like, ďThe people who donít believe in cycling, the cynics, the skeptics, I feel sorry for you. Iím sorry you canít dream big and Iím sorry you donít believe in miracles.Ē Iím sorry I hurt so many people through litigation, by bullying, by using my money and my prominence in cycling and my political connections to destroy their careers.


    But all of this was the cover-up, not the crime, and I felt like I needed to do it to protect myself, and to protect what I was trying to do. The rage and desire consumed me again. Iím not sorry about Livestrong, because even if it doesnít fund cancer research it provides hope, because I provide hope. Some people might say it diverts money away from the science of curing cancer, but Iím not sorry that those yellow bracelets became totems to a lot of people.
    Itís like a guy named Michael Farber wrote in Sports Illustrated: he had been diagnosed with cancer, and while he was waiting in an oncologistís office another guy took the bracelet off his wrist and handed it to him, and said, ďHere.Ē And it gave that man hope, and hope matters. Heís in remission.
    Iíll never apologize for giving people hope.
    And this is going to cost me millions, personally, but the rest of my life is about one thing now; about continuing as a symbol of hope for people with cancer. Thatís why Iím coming clean today, to protect that.
    Because goddamnit, yeah, I doped. But I suffered on that bike, did anything I could on that bike, emptied myself on that bike. I pumped my veins full of whatever it took to win, no matter what it did to me, no matter what it cost. Does that sound familiar? Does it sound like anything else to you?
    Cycling was a lot like cancer to me. I faced overwhelming odds, and I beat them the only way I could. So I hope thereís a way for people to still look at me and feel their hearts lift a little, feel lightened, feel like anything is possible. After everything, thatís still important. After everything, thatís what I have left.
    Last edited by visor; 10-24-2012 at 02:02 AM.

  11. #62
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Arrakis
    Posts
    8,668
    Mentioned
    40 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yeah. Always the justification. Sounds familiar.

  12. #63
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    coming to a court near you...
    Posts
    28,044
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Haha, nice article (make sure you click on the link before reading ). The anti-apology.

  13. #64
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Arrakis
    Posts
    8,668
    Mentioned
    40 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Source: Disgraced cyclist Armstrong says he's 'sorry' to Livestrong staff

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/lance-armst...7476--spt.html

    Excerpts:

    AUSTIN, Texas - Lance Armstrong apologized to the staff at his Livestrong cancer foundation before heading to an interview with Oprah Winfrey, a person with direct knowledge of the meeting told The Associated Press.

    ...The cyclist will make a limited confession to Winfrey about his role as the head of a long-running scheme to dominate the Tour with the aid of performance-enhancing drugs, a person with knowledge of the situation has told the AP.

    ...In a text to the AP on Saturday, Armstrong said: "I told her (Winfrey) to go wherever she wants and I'll answer the questions directly, honestly and candidly. That's all I can say."

    ...Former teammate Floyd Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour de France title for doping, has filed a federal whistle-blower lawsuit that accused Armstrong of defrauding the U.S. Postal Service. The Justice Department has yet to decide whether it will join the suit as a plaintiff.

    The London-based Sunday Times also is suing Armstrong to recover about $500,000 it paid him to settle a libel lawsuit. On Sunday, the newspaper took out a full-page ad in the Chicago Tribune, offering Winfrey suggestions for what questions to ask Armstrong. Dallas-based SCA Promotions, which tried to deny Armstrong a promised bonus for a Tour de France win, has threatened to bring yet another lawsuit seeking to recover more than $7.5 million an arbitration panel awarded the cyclist in that dispute.

    The lawsuit most likely to be influenced by a confession might be the Sunday Times case. Potential perjury charges stemming from Armstrong's sworn testimony in the 2005 arbitration fight would not apply because of the statute of limitations. Armstrong was not deposed during the federal investigation that was closed last year.

    Many of his sponsors dropped Armstrong after the damning USADA report ó at the cost of tens of millions of dollars ó and soon after, he left the board of Livestrong, which he founded in 1997. Armstrong is still said to be worth about $100 million.

  14. #65
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,390
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    We'll see what he "admits" to when the Oprah Winfrey show airs on Thursday.

  15. #66
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Arrakis
    Posts
    8,668
    Mentioned
    40 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    He just might if he believes it will help him cling on to his fortune...

  16. #67
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    13,345
    Mentioned
    33 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    This headline

    "Cycling could be dropped from the Olympics if Lance Armstrong implicates the sport's governing body in a cover-up, says International Olympic Committee member Dick Pound. "

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/21034694

  17. #68
    Regular Member AlanY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    England
    Posts
    4,447
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    This headline

    "Cycling could be dropped from the Olympics if Lance Armstrong implicates the sport's governing body in a cover-up, says International Olympic Committee member Dick Pound. "

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/21034694
    why do we need the advises or even listen to a lying cheater!

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 143
    : 09-30-2010, 11:54 PM
  2. Is Bao chun lai cheating?? Chen Hong got red handed cheating!!!
    By eagle in forum Asian Games 2006 - Badminton
    Replies: 81
    : 09-06-2010, 01:00 AM
  3. Was Chen Jin cheating?
    By bogensaebel in forum World Championships 2010
    Replies: 430
    : 09-02-2010, 02:07 AM
  4. Year 2009: Lance Armstrong is back !!!
    By chris-ccc in forum Chit-Chat
    Replies: 64
    : 10-16-2009, 03:04 AM
  5. cheating...using the NSS
    By wing-omega5-0 in forum General Forum
    Replies: 16
    : 10-19-2006, 03:59 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •