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  1. #18
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    You may be surprised that it is easier to execute a clear from back line to the back line on the other side than to pass the shuttle speed test.
    Just try it and you can see what I mean. For Malaysia at sea level try with a speed 76 shuttle of a high quality shuttle that is used in tournaments.
    A mere foot difference in shuttle speed test is effectively more than a foot difference in a clear.
    I am not suggesting that tournament women players use a slower shuttle speed than those used by men tournament players. What I am suggesting is that players who are not advanced enough to clear the shuttle speed test, especially applicable to the less advanced weaker ***, would be better off using a higher speed shuttle.
    Now please try this if you are in Malaysia. Use a speed 76 high quality shuttlecock and try out the speed test. Most recreational players will fail to reach the minimum distance by at least a foot or two. One foot short is one speed short.
    Many recreational players will initially complain that a higher speed shuttle (say 77 in Malaysia) is too fast and they constantly hit out. Such complaints are almost always from shots hit at mid-court or near the net. The real test is to do a clear from back line to back line or to lift or clear from underhand at the back line to the opposite court back line. If you cannot do this but still complain the shuttle is too fast, based on shots hit at mid-court or near the net, then you are not advanced enough.
    In the speed test please don't cheat. The shuttle must be struck over the back line, not in front, in an upward movement.

  2. #19
    Regular Member demolidor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    You know.. I could be wrong about the difference in power on the underhand stroke cause' I've never managed to get a few 'advanced' players to do the test. However, I do believe that if you ask Lin Dan to hit an "underhand stroke" as hard as he can when he was 19, compare that with a stroke that he would hit when he's 50.. I think there should quite a bit of difference. Power generated by a flexible and stronger person .. against an old stiff fellow.. um.. who knows?
    That's just it I guess: where do you get from it should be "as hard as you can"?


  3. #20
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    I wouldn't consider myself an advanced player.. but I can routinely beat the shuttlecock with an underhand stroke back to a chair where I keep my bag and shuttlecocks about 10 feet behind the court from mid court. The shuttle speed is 76. I've got to try the test from the back line when I play later today.

    The correct shuttle speed should be no less than 53cm (1.7 feet) and not more than 99cm (3.2 feet) from the back boundary line. That's a 152cm (5 feet) range. You said 1 foot shot is 1 speed shot. With that I conclude that there are 5 shuttle speeds within the "correct" shuttle speed range. The range is way to wide for a game that can be won or lost in centimeters. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if the above is true, the 'advanced' player should be able to put a shuttles with speeds from 75 up to 79 within the 'acceptable speed zone'.

  4. #21
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    Terence, have you seen Zhao Jianhua hit a shuttle at aged 40+ ?

    Because of his technique he doesnt have to even try to hit hard to get to the baseline and I'm sure he will be hitting just as hard at 50+

    Yes old age will hinder your strokes but bad technique will hinder it much much more.

  5. #22
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    The correct shuttle speed should be no less than 53cm (1.7 feet) and not more than 99cm (3.2 feet) from the back boundary line.

    46cm....

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    I wouldn't consider myself an advanced player.. but I can routinely beat the shuttlecock with an underhand stroke back to a chair where I keep my bag and shuttlecocks about 10 feet behind the court from mid court. The shuttle speed is 76. I've got to try the test from the back line when I play later today.

    The correct shuttle speed should be no less than 53cm (1.7 feet) and not more than 99cm (3.2 feet) from the back boundary line. That's a 152cm (5 feet) range. You said 1 foot shot is 1 speed shot. With that I conclude that there are 5 shuttle speeds within the "correct" shuttle speed range. The range is way to wide for a game that can be won or lost in centimeters. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if the above is true, the 'advanced' player should be able to put a shuttles with speeds from 75 up to 79 within the 'acceptable speed zone'.
    No, not even Lin Dan can use a speed 74 shuttle to reach the distance at sea level in Malaysia. The speed test is more forgiving with the minimum distance and it is extremely rare that a good player can reach the maximum distance with the correct speed shuttle. The minimum distance is about slightly less than 11 inches short of the back double service line. You will notice that the video shown above shows the shuttle barely making it, and even that the shuttle was struck slightly in front of the back line. If you can reach the back doubles service line then you are pretty good.
    The test demonstrates the shuttle's high-drag properties. It slows down considerably towards the end. The key is your racket hand speed which speeds the shuttle at its maximum initially and them slows down ever more after that.
    The moment the shuttle reaches its maximum height it will gyrate inwards, slowing it down, before dropping inwards. The trick is to go the longest distance before it drops and hand speed is important, not strength.
    Usually high quality shuttles will fall within a tight range of each other. The minimum and maximum distance is to cover more shuttles other than the top quality ones.
    Shuttle speeds are a general guide and is determined as a standard based on an advanced player. The game is won or lost by a human being, the player who uses control and not by a machine lobbing out shuttles at a predetermined force. If you are at the net and you use a sledgehammer-like smash you will hit the shuttle out by a mile-this is not due to a faster speed shuttle.
    How about doing the test in earnest? But do use a high quality grade A goose feather shuttle. Cheaper shuttles can sometimes fly out because they put lead shots in the cork base and they do not exhibit the characteristics of a high-drag shuttle but more like a small stone.

  7. #24
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    terencechan, how did your shuttle speed test go?

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    Quote Originally Posted by taneepak View Post
    terencechan, how did your shuttle speed test go?
    Didn't manage to do the shuttlecock test last week. There were some 'issues' with the court. I'm moving to another court this Sat, I'll make sure to do the shuttle test this Sat. I'll update on Sunday

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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    Didn't manage to do the shuttlecock test last week. There were some 'issues' with the court. I'm moving to another court this Sat, I'll make sure to do the shuttle test this Sat. I'll update on Sunday
    Any update? Please let us know how it went.

  10. #27
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    Must have given up. lol.

  11. #28
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    Sorry .. sorry.. sorry.. 1000 apologies. Always forget the test.. I get too excited every time I step on the badminton court!.. I promise to do the test tomorrow. I'll update on Sunday night.

  12. #29
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    Just i thought its arm speed, which loosely related to strength and can be helped by increasing strength. You can have very fast skinny arms. Also long arms help.
    I am newbie to badminton but not to other sports. So i am not just drawing this opinion from watching badminton players.
    But obviously technique is the most important aspect of hitting the shuttle hard

  13. #30
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    Here is another test to try out on court. Try a high singles forehand serve that can reach 25 feet or more, at least 22 feet, high and have the shuttlecock land within 6" from the back line. If you can do it then you are an advanced player and here is one test that will see if all your skills on pronation, supination, and technique that you have learned bear fruition.
    Don't look down on this extreme high singles serve and it is harder than you think. It also does not require strength, just pure wrist and forearm and yes technique.

  14. #31
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    In answer to the OP's question.


    It's all about experience & getting consistent shuttles. I know how hard *I* expect to hit shuttle to get it it to the Service baseline. I'm assuming the majority of the shuttles I've used over the years are the right speed and have gotten used to the trajectory & flight characteristics.

    The point of the speed test is to get a consistent flight for a shuttle. Normally most clubs will have the right speed of shuttle for the conditions & everyone learns how to play with them.
    After a while most people will get a feel of how much power it takes to get the average shuttle to land on the service baseline. It depends on your power & technique but most people will use a "full" swing as adding another variable like "half swing" makes it more difficult to be consistent.

    Every now & again a batch of shuttles will be slightly fast/slow & using the test can help you determine if you need to adjust your game or if everyone playing agrees to tip the shuttle.
    You can have a number of people who do the test with the same shuttle & they don't all use the same power/technique. What they should all be able to do is have the same expectations based of experience of "average" flight characteristics & agree if a shuttle is fast/slow.

    It also means that in countries with Seasons (winter/summer) we can use the test to judge when to swap over to different speed shuttles.
    Last edited by mindfields; 11-18-2010 at 11:20 AM.

  15. #32
    Regular Member demolidor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mindfields View Post
    In answer to the OP's question.


    It's all about experience & getting consistent shuttles. I know how hard *I* expect to hit shuttle to get it it to the Service baseline. I'm assuming the majority of the shuttles I've used over the years are the right speed and have gotten used to the trajectory & flight characteristics.

    The point of the speed test is to get a consistent flight for a shuttle. Normally most clubs will have the right speed of shuttle for the conditions & everyone learns how to play with them.
    After a while most people will get a feel of how much power it takes to get the average shuttle to land on the service baseline. It depends on your power & technique but most people will use a "full" swing as adding another variable like "half swing" makes it more difficult to be consistent.

    Every now & again a batch of shuttles will be slightly fast/slow & using the test can help you determine if you need to adjust your game or if everyone playing agrees to tip the shuttle.
    You can have a number of people who do the test with the same shuttle & they don't all use the same power/technique. What they should all be able to do is have the same expectations based of experience of "average" flight characteristics & agree if a shuttle is fast/slow.

    It also means that in countries with Seasons (winter/summer) we can use the test to judge when to swap over to different speed shuttles.
    Yes we were drifiting away. That sums it up very nicely .

  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by demolidor View Post
    Yes we were drifiting away. That sums it up very nicely .
    I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with you mindfields and demolidor. The point of the speed test is NOT to get a consistent flight for the shuttle. You could be "CONSISTENTLY" playing with the wrong shuttle speed. The point of the speed test is to ensure the shuttle cock flies as a certain "standard" speed whether you're playing in the summer, winter, up in the mountains or below sea level.

    Now, after so many weeks of delay, I've finally got to doing the speed test. Sorry for the delay Taneepak. I tested 3 shots on an RSL shuttlecock (77 speed). I managed to land all 3 shuttles around 2 -3 feet of the back doubles service line.

    My conclusion after the test was.. I'm still think there should be a more scientific way to test the shuttlecocks. In golf, they test the golf balls using a machine called Iron Byron and probably a few more sophisticated machines who's name I can't recall at the moment. Anyway, the machine hits the ball at a precise launch angle and speed. Ball launch angle, spin rate and carry can be measured precisely. The golf associations use these test to control and limit the maximum distance golf balls can fly. Well, I'm sure some smart badminton enthusiast would have invented such a machine. Only problem is, it's not in official badminton association's rules book to manage shuttlecock speed. I say it's time to kick these bunch of useless old goats out the IBF and have some new blood in. Shuttlecock test, video replays, rude referees, the confusing and difficult to implement low service rule.. just to mention a few things that needs improving to make badminton a more popular sport internationally. whew.. I think I just blew out some steam.

  17. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by terencechan View Post
    I'm afraid I'll have to disagree with you mindfields and demolidor. The point of the speed test is NOT to get a consistent flight for the shuttle. You could be "CONSISTENTLY" playing with the wrong shuttle speed. The point of the speed test is to ensure the shuttle cock flies as a certain "standard" speed whether you're playing in the summer, winter, up in the mountains or below sea level.

    Now, after so many weeks of delay, I've finally got to doing the speed test. Sorry for the delay Taneepak. I tested 3 shots on an RSL shuttlecock (77 speed). I managed to land all 3 shuttles around 2 -3 feet of the back doubles service line.

    My conclusion after the test was.. I'm still think there should be a more scientific way to test the shuttlecocks. In golf, they test the golf balls using a machine called Iron Byron and probably a few more sophisticated machines who's name I can't recall at the moment. Anyway, the machine hits the ball at a precise launch angle and speed. Ball launch angle, spin rate and carry can be measured precisely. The golf associations use these test to control and limit the maximum distance golf balls can fly. Well, I'm sure some smart badminton enthusiast would have invented such a machine. Only problem is, it's not in official badminton association's rules book to manage shuttlecock speed. I say it's time to kick these bunch of useless old goats out the IBF and have some new blood in. Shuttlecock test, video replays, rude referees, the confusing and difficult to implement low service rule.. just to mention a few things that needs improving to make badminton a more popular sport internationally. whew.. I think I just blew out some steam.
    In Malaysia the speed is 76 for a non-airconditioned hall at sea level as speed 77 is faster by exactly one foot or 30cm. Therefore your effort with speed 77 which falls about 2 to 3 feet short of the back doubles service line would translate to a shortfall of 3 to 4 feet for the correct speed of 76.
    This is a rather large difference from the minimum standard of 27cm or 10 to 11 inches short of the back doubles service line for a speed 76 shuttle.
    As each speed is 30cm distance you may have to use a shuttle speed of 78 to 79 for a non-airconditoned hall or speed 77 to 78 for an airconditioned hall. In other words, your hitting ability is too far short of what is considered standard.
    This will then allow you to play the full length of the court instead of playing half-court shots unnecessarily.

    Shuttlecocks of a certain level are speed tested by machines under set conditions for correct speed at the plant. Cheaper grades are not tested this way. Medium grades are speed tested but with very wide and overlapping tolerances. The court test is primarily used to test and select a suitable speed for that particular hall. In general, altitude has the greatest impact on speed with temperature next.

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