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    Default Control / Power specifications for all Yonex racquets as on site

    hi all ,

    first post to this forum, please do help

    the yonex site has specifications for only selected racquets
    where can i get racquet specifications ( control / power / flex ratings )
    for Yonex racquets, preferably the whole range ( Iso, CAB etc. )

    Thanks a lot,
    Rajeev

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    Rajeev,

    Here is a link to Yonex Japan with racquet info.
    http://www.yonex.co.jp/badminton/feature/mp/style.html

    There should be two charts on this page. There should be two charts on this page each with an X-axis and Y-axis. The top chart has racquet info. As best as I can translate(I also had a friend help me), the X-axis on the racquet chart indicates how good the particular racquet is for doubles play(left side of X-axis) or singles play(right side of X-axis). The Y-axis indicates how good the racquet is for smash players(top of Y-axis) or receive players(bottom of Y-axis). I believe Yonex created this chart based on the balance, stiffness, and perhaps the overall weight of the racquet.

    I think I found info on individual racquet stiffness on shuttle-house.com. This website seems to have scanned in the entire Yonex catalogue. I'm sorry Kwun, I couldn't figure out how to post the link for this picture(tricky website or maybe I'm just bad with computers) but anyway here is a chart showing racquet info. It's all in Japanese, but I think the little spectrum indicator on the right shows stiffness for each racquet. Blue seems to indicate stiff and yellow is flexible. It makes sense when you look at the ISO-TIS (ISO swing power) because the SX is on the stiff side of the spectrum and the SA is on the flexible side.

    Hope all this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Originally posted by AMRaider
    The Y-axis indicates how good the racquet is for smash players(top of Y-axis) or receive players(bottom of Y-axis).
    What the heck does the "smash player" and the "recieve player" actually mean? I've seen people with killer smashes using extremely flexible rackets.

    Seriously, I'm kinda confused with Yonex's sorting scheme ><

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    Originally posted by JChen99
    What the heck does the "smash player" and the "recieve player" actually mean? I've seen people with killer smashes using extremely flexible rackets.

    Seriously, I'm kinda confused with Yonex's sorting scheme ><
    Right of the X axis is power, left is control. I believe for the Y axis, the top is bounce, and the bottom is control. This was posted before...

    PS, the flex and stiff thing is sorta overated. Someone made a very good statement that just because you have a flex you can't produce power. If you have good power you should be able to generate power from any sort of flex. What you put into a racquet is what you'll get out of it. Something along those lines.

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    Originally posted by Yodums
    Right of the X axis is power, left is control. I believe for the Y axis, the top is bounce, and the bottom is control. This was posted before...

    PS, the flex and stiff thing is sorta overated. Someone made a very good statement that just because you have a flex you can't produce power. If you have good power you should be able to generate power from any sort of flex. What you put into a racquet is what you'll get out of it. Something along those lines.
    Flex... but it gives whip, extra energy? uck... maybe I should try in my physics class more... maybe I'll understand more of the concepts...

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    Here's a link to the United States Stringers Association basic facts about frames. Maybe this will help clear a few things up. http://www.racquettech.com/basicfacts.html

    As for the meaning of the axis on the racquet charts at Yonex Japan, a Japanese speaking individual explained to me that the top of the y-axis says "Smash player" and the bottom of y-axis says "Received player". As for the x-axis, he told me that the left side of the x-axis says "Doubles player" and the right side of the x-axis says "Singles player". What these terms mean exactly, I'm not too sure. However, I think that the racquets for "Smash players" are stiffer. The MP100(extra-stiff rating according to Yonex USA) is all the way at the top and more flexible racquets such as the MP80(medium flex according to Yonex USA) is close to the bottom. (This "stiffness" rating also corresponds with Yonex's catalague, see my previous post with the racquet JPEG chart) Also, take a look at the positions of the ISO-swingpower. The SX is close to the top than the SS, the SS is closer to the top than the SR... and so on.

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    Well, smash player would most likely mean it is power user, stiff racquets. Recieving most likely means defensive and rather flexible.

    Yodums

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    Makes sense to me. I have found that flexible racquets tend to be more "forgiving" upon the impact of receiving a smash. For me anyway, it's easier to gauge how much power to use on a smash return with a flexible racquet. Sorry, it's a little hard to put into words. When I receive a smash with a flexible racquet, it's easier for me to use a light touch and return with a drop shot. When I was using a stiffer racquet, it was harder to use a light touch to return with a drop shot and my drops shots were too high.

    Just my experience. I'm sure it's somewhat different for other people.


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    Originally posted by AMRaider
    Makes sense to me. I have found that flexible racquets tend to be more "forgiving" upon the impact of receiving a smash. For me anyway, it's easier to gauge how much power to use on a smash return with a flexible racquet. Sorry, it's a little hard to put into words. When I receive a smash with a flexible racquet, it's easier for me to use a light touch and return with a drop shot. When I was using a stiffer racquet, it was harder to use a light touch to return with a drop shot and my drops shots were too high.

    Just my experience. I'm sure it's somewhat different for other people.

    I know exactly what you mean. When using my Ti-3 (Very flexible). On defense, all I have to do is flick my wrist and the return will be equal to my BK 865 (Medium stiff) where I have to really put some snap into it on the return.

    Yodums

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    Originally posted by Yodums
    I know exactly what you mean. When using my Ti-3 (Very flexible). On defense, all I have to do is flick my wrist and the return will be equal to my BK 865 (Medium stiff) where I have to really put some snap into it on the return.

    Yodums
    hmm... I guess I'll never find out! My rackets are either Extra stiff or Extra extra stiff

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    Originally posted by JChen99
    hmm... I guess I'll never find out! My rackets are either Extra stiff or Extra extra stiff
    I heard you were looking for a flexible racquet for your sis so maybe you can jack hers.

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    Originally posted by Yodums
    I heard you were looking for a flexible racquet for your sis so maybe you can jack hers.
    yap I am, however, I gotta pay for her racket too!! >< sucks to be her coach. First I dun get paid for giving her lessons, and I gotta supply all the birds and rackets, court fees, and anything she needs ><

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