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  1. #18
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Independent Badminton Players List

    .
    So how many Badminton players have gone independent, up to now?

    Let's start an Independent Badminton Players List;

    1. Taufik Hidayat (INA)
    2. Wong Choong Hann (MAS)
    3. Vita Marissa/Nova Widianto (INA)
    4. Gan Teik Chai/Tan Bin Shen (MAS)
    5. Hendra Setiawan/Markis Kido (INA)
    6. Hafiz Hashim (MAS)

    Hope that our BCers can continue to add more to this list.
    .

  2. #19
    Regular Member miksss's Avatar
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    Tommy Sugiarto, Alamsyah Yunus, Hendra Aprida Gunawan/Alvent Yulianto, Maria Kristin Yulianti, Tri Kusuma/Nadya Melati, Vita Marissa/Nadya Melati, Kido/Lita Nurlita.
    Last edited by miksss; 06-10-2011 at 01:31 AM.

  3. #20
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    Kuan Beng Hong, Zulfadli Zulkifli..

  4. #21
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Badminton players who have gone independent

    Quote Originally Posted by miksss View Post
    Tommy Sugiarto, Alamsyah Yunus, Hendra Aprida Gunawan/Alvent Yulianto, Maria Kristin Yulianti, Tri Kusuma/Nadya Melati, Vita Marissa/Nadya Melati, Kido/Lita Nurlita.
    Quote Originally Posted by george@chongwei View Post
    Kuan Beng Hong, Zulfadli Zulkifli..
    .
    Thanks, I shall add them in the list.

    Independent Badminton Players List;

    1. Taufik Hidayat (INA)
    2. Wong Choong Hann (MAS)
    3. Vita Marissa/Nova Widianto (INA)
    4. Gan Teik Chai/Tan Bin Shen (MAS)
    5. Hendra Setiawan/Markis Kido (INA)
    6. Hafiz Hashim (MAS)
    7. Tommy Sugiarto (INA)
    8. Kuan Beng Hong (MAS)
    9. Alamsyah Yunus (INA)
    10. Zulfadli Zulkifli (MAS)
    11. Hendra Aprida Gunawan/Alvent Yulianto (INA)
    12. Maria Kristin Yulianti (INA)
    13. Tri Kusuma/Nadya Melati (INA)
    14. Vita Marissa/Nadya Melati (INA)
    15. Kido/Lita Nurlita (INA)

    So far we have players only from INA and MAS.
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 06-10-2011 at 02:03 AM.

  5. #22
    Regular Member demolidor's Avatar
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    Dicky Palyama, Eric Pang, Judith Meulendijks, Yao Jie ... (NED)

    What is the definition anyway? No federation funding and facilities? Maybe the likes of Tony Gunawan qualify as well ...
    Last edited by demolidor; 06-11-2011 at 11:40 AM.

  6. #23
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    How many badminton players go independent fr their national bodies and could survive well from their professional income alone?

    The problem with badminton is that the sports did not yet have an environment that could well support a good bunch of players like tennis, golf...

    Going independent whilst keeping good competition level need good expense. Take pro tennis player as example, they have to hire a coach, a physical trainer, doctor, psychiatrist, ... A whole team of support!

    How could you finance such need without reasonable income? Imagine a tennis player entering the 2nd round of FRench Open earns more than many Premium SS winners in badminton !!!....

    Some of the badminton player able to maintain life with going Independent as actually due to their wealthy family background...

  7. #24
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    Lee wan wah/chan chong ming.

  8. #25
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Default What is the definition anyway?

    Quote Originally Posted by demolidor View Post
    Dicky Palyama, Eric Pang, Judith Meulendijks, Yao Jie ... (NED)

    What is the definition anyway? No federation funding and facilities? Maybe the likes of Tony Gunawan qualify as well ...
    .
    Like what Li Na said in Post #1;

    "If you stay in the national team you don't need to take care of anything... They do everything for you," she said.

    "But right now I have my team around with me... If I'm lazy, I want to rest, I can say, 'Okay, now stop - I want to rest'.

    "Before if I (were) on the national team, I have to follow the team because I couldn't do many thing as one because we are the team."


    It's about players going on their own and having independence from their National Associations at Individual events/tournaments.

    Most of them will play for their National Associations when asked to do so at Inter-Nations events/tournaments; like at the Thomas, Uber, and Sudirman Cups, and at the Olympic Games. National Associations will include them as their players. The only thing is: Professional players can go out on their own to get their own sponsors, without needing their National Associations' approval.
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 06-14-2011 at 01:18 AM.

  9. #26
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Independent Badminton Players List

    .
    Independent Badminton Players List

    1. Taufik Hidayat (INA)
    2. Wong Choong Hann (MAS)
    3. Vita Marissa/Nova Widianto (INA)
    4. Gan Teik Chai/Tan Bin Shen (MAS)
    5. Hendra Setiawan/Markis Kido (INA)
    6. Hafiz Hashim (MAS)
    7. Tommy Sugiarto (INA)
    8. Kuan Beng Hong (MAS)
    9. Alamsyah Yunus (INA)
    10. Zulfadli Zulkifli (MAS)
    11. Hendra Aprida Gunawan/Alvent Yulianto (INA)
    12. Maria Kristin Yulianti (INA)
    13. Tri Kusuma/Nadya Melati (INA)
    14. Vita Marissa/Nadya Melati (INA)
    15. Kido/Lita Nurlita (INA)
    16. Dicky Palyama (NED)
    17. Eric Pang (NED)
    18. Judith Meulendijks (NED)
    19. Yao Jie (NED)
    20. Tony Gunawan (USA)
    21. Lee Wan Wah/Chan Chong Ming (MAS)

    Thanks to BCers for sending us more names of independent players.
    .

  10. #27
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    Looks like some thai player like boonsak, salakjit, songphon, kunchala, sudket, saralee..etc.. is playing independently too if im not mistaken? or their issue with the thai association solved already?

  11. #28
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Question Who are the independent players from Thailand?

    Quote Originally Posted by george@chongwei View Post
    Looks like some thai player like boonsak, salakjit, songphon, kunchala, sudket, saralee..etc.. is playing independently too if im not mistaken? or their issue with the thai association solved already?
    .
    Hope that BCers from Thailand can enlighten us on this.
    .

  12. #29
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow Julia Wong will now train independently and handle her own expenses

    .
    Independent Badminton Players List

    1. Taufik Hidayat (INA)
    2. Wong Choong Hann (MAS)
    3. Vita Marissa/Nova Widianto (INA)
    4. Gan Teik Chai/Tan Bin Shen (MAS)
    5. Hendra Setiawan/Markis Kido (INA)
    6. Hafiz Hashim (MAS)
    7. Tommy Sugiarto (INA)
    8. Kuan Beng Hong (MAS)
    9. Alamsyah Yunus (INA)
    10. Zulfadli Zulkifli (MAS)
    11. Hendra Aprida Gunawan/Alvent Yulianto (INA)
    12. Maria Kristin Yulianti (INA)
    13. Tri Kusuma/Nadya Melati (INA)
    14. Vita Marissa/Nadya Melati (INA)
    15. Kido/Lita Nurlita (INA)
    16. Dicky Palyama (NED)
    17. Eric Pang (NED)
    18. Judith Meulendijks (NED)
    19. Yao Jie (NED)
    20. Tony Gunawan (USA)
    21. Lee Wan Wah/Chan Chong Ming (MAS)
    22. Julia Wong (MAS)*

    * Just remembered this article (released 2 weeks ago); http://www.mmail.com.my/content/7344...eturn-stronger

    Julia Wong will now train independently and handle her own expenses.
    .

  13. #30
    Regular Member demolidor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    .
    Like what Li Na said in Post #1;

    "If you stay in the national team you don't need to take care of anything... They do everything for you," she said.

    "But right now I have my team around with me... If I'm lazy, I want to rest, I can say, 'Okay, now stop - I want to rest'.

    "Before if I (were) on the national team, I have to follow the team because I couldn't do many thing as one because we are the team."


    It's about players going on their own and having independence from their National Associations at Individual events/tournaments.

    Most of them will play for their National Associations when asked to do so at Inter-Nations events/tournaments; like at the Thomas, Uber, and Sudirman Cups, and at the Olympic Games. National Associations will include them as their players. The only thing is: Professional players can go out on their own to get their own sponsors, without needing their National Associations' approval.
    .
    From what I've understood then all US players qualify, probably most if not all Canadian players as well. Even in Europe if you can afford it most would qualify. If no funding at all from the national assoc. was implied in the above then you'd have to look harder. Possibly Ella Diehl and Anastasia Russkikh qualify but can't say with certainty.

  14. #31
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Let players also to have some 'Individual Pride'

    Quote Originally Posted by demolidor View Post
    From what I've understood then all US players qualify, probably most if not all Canadian players as well. Even in Europe if you can afford it most would qualify. If no funding at all from the national assoc. was implied in the above then you'd have to look harder. Possibly Ella Diehl and Anastasia Russkikh qualify but can't say with certainty.
    .
    If this is the case, then it looks like the China Badminton Association is one of the main forces holding back Badminton as an 'individual' sport (compared to 'team' sport).

    But I am not saying that CBA is doing it wrong.

    What I am saying is: CBA shouldn't be still focusing on 'National Pride'; Let their players also to have some 'Individual Pride'.
    .

  15. #32
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Wouldn't it be nice if Lin Dan can play as an individual?

    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    What I am saying is: CBA shouldn't be still focusing on 'National Pride'; Let their players also to have some 'Individual Pride'.
    .
    Wouldn't it be nice if Lin Dan can play as an individual?; getting sponsored by;

    * Yonex (for racket)
    * Li Ning (for clothing)
    * Nike (for shoes)
    * Emirates Airlines (for air travel)
    * Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank (for banking)
    * MacDonalds (for fast food)
    * Red Bull (for energy drink)
    * Mercedes-Benze (for car)
    * etc, etc, ......


    .

  16. #33
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Li Na shows Chinese the secret to a harmonious revolution

    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    What I am saying is: CBA shouldn't be still focusing on 'National Pride'; Let their players also to have some 'Individual Pride'.
    .
    Hahaha... It's "the system" in China which some sports writers who are criticising.

    Just being informed about Li Na is being held as the first internationally recognised athlete of this generation who has achieved superstardom by effectively turning her back on "the system".

    ====== * ====== start of article ====== * ======

    CHINA'S Li Na is not satisfied with being French Open champion. She wants Wimbledon as badly as China wants global respect. Like her mother country, she is in hot pursuit of the world's top billing the No 1 ranking.

    But don't be fooled. This new superstar, with an indignant attitude, a sense of humour and an internationally appealing style, isn't just another spin-off from the factory floor of the China sports system. China won more gold medals than any other country at the Beijing Olympics in 2008. A feat the nation hopes to repeat in London in a year's time. Yet the world's most populous nation only has three truly global sports stars.

    Unlike basketballer Yao Ming and hurdler Liu Xiang, the first Chinese male to win a gold medal on the track at the Olympics in 2004, Li Na has become the first internationally recognised athlete of this generation who has achieved superstardom by effectively turning her back on "the system".

    After finishing runner-up in the Australian Open in January, Li topped up her cash prize purse of $1.2 million with a further $5m in endorsements. Her first-prize cheque at the French Open was $1.6m and there are reports in China that another $30m in potential sponsorships are on the table. She already wears Nike, plays with Babolat racquets and endorses Rolex, Haagen-Dazs and SpiderTech (the trendy black knee taping she is not seen without).

    Her management team at IMG have been run ragged returning calls from those seeking a slice of the first Chinese grand slam winner. Marketing experts predict she is about to become the richest sportswoman in the world.

    Coincidentally, the WTA Tour last year decided to put special emphasis on developing the game in Asia as the last untapped market. Li's rise to the top is fortuitous for the bean counters in the Asia Pacific region. Speaking on China Central Television during the French Open, WTA Asia Pacific managing director Fabrice Chouquet said of Li: "She belongs in the elite of women's tennis. Clay is not her favourite surface and look what's happened? She will definitely challenge at Wimbledon and the US Open."

    They are certainly hoping so.

    Li's trek to the top of the mount has been achieved without nearly so many hurdles as those placed before Yao and Liu. They manage to succeed as best they can while still being tied to the strict Chinese sports management style: calendars determined by the authorities, on permanent call for national duty, training in China when requested, making appearances when told to and giving a hefty proportion (up to 65 per cent) of prizemoney and sponsorship back to the authorities as repayment for the nation's investment. Not content with this approach, Li Na quietly devised her own plan.

    At six years of age, Li Na took up the sport her father favoured, badminton. But rather than finessing the shuttlecock, she had a determination and style that looked more suited to tennis. On the recommendation of her coach she made the switch aged nine. By 1997 she was in the national squad and turned pro two years later. She was already butting heads with the tennis authorities at home.

    Having started a relationship with her doubles partner, now husband, Jiang Shan, her national coach took a dim view. Li asked for a personal coach to avoid the conflict, but was rejected. Disillusioned with her unfulfilled tennis career and micro-managed personal life, she quit the national team and studied journalism.

    With a new strategy clearly in place, Li returned to the national team in 2004. By 2006 she was married and obtained permission for her now retired husband to become her personal coach.

    Success immediately followed with a fourth place at the Beijing Olympic Games and a win over Venus Williams.

    By the end of 2008, Li's improved performance convinced the authorities to loosen their grip. The top players were granted permission to choose their own coaching teams and authorities agreed to forego a massive slice of earnings and endorsement fees.

    Li Na only gives back 10-12 per cent of her earnings, not like the 65 per cent handed over by China's other superstars.

    The tennis authorities in China were smart enough to realise that allowing more freedom meant better results and that, in the end, would reflect better on the nation and attract sponsorship of events and overseas investment in the world's biggest marketplace.

    More than 50 million people in China watched Li Na scoop the French Open title, many of them watching a tennis match for the first time. By the time Li kissed the trophy, there were five million Chinese talking about her on Weibo, China's No 1 micro blog website.

    Reporting on the win, the China Daily said Li Na had a "ruthless mindset" and an unwillingness to be "shackled by the Chinese sports system". A "reputation for being difficult" led her "to do it her way and that way has worked in the end". Realising that bashing her head against the system was getting her nowhere, Li took time out, readjusted her mindset, and came back to beat the officials at their own game. The result is surprisingly harmonious for both sides.

    The West often scoffs at China's repetitious claims of harmony being their number one motivation. Yet from the congested roads to their cluttered homes, from their overcrowded workspaces to the Great Hall of the People, harmony, as an ideal, is never far from the centre. Threaten harmony and you threaten the sleeping dragon.

    The Li Na revolution is not to challenge the system but, much like trying to survive an ocean rip, go with it, swim towards the edge and casually make your exit. Li Na is the test case; if she succeeds, a flood of others will follow.

    The party's great paranoid fear of another revolution will not be the kind they imagine. It will not be a mass gathering demanding the overthrow of the party. It will be individuals, a lot of them, using what they've learned from the system to do it by, and for, themselves.

    The realisation that a lifetime's dedication to the country must be accompanied with personal reward has hit home. Take away the personal reward and you take away the motive to work, to succeed. Give back the individual motive and the people have the ability not just to serve, but to surprise.

    Li Na is showing a billion people how.

    ====== * ====== end of article ====== * ======

    Source: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news...-1226075250932
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 06-14-2011 at 05:15 PM.

  17. #34
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    Default It's a coach in "the system" changed Li Na to tennis

    Ironically, switching from badminton to tennis was not a Li Na's decision, it was the recommendation from a Chinese badminton coach in "the system" that people is now criticizing!!!

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