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  1. #18
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lcleing View Post
    Hmm...Off topic but most of the players don't have the luxury of training full time as they are earning below average wage. If I remembered correctly, Hans Vittinghus has to work part time in a delivery company and train at the same time. Martin Luungard and Jens Eriksen have their daily jobs to take care of during their active playing days as well.
    Marc Zwiebler was an economic student(not sure if he has graduated) when he reached the final of denmark super series last year. Most of the Malaysia backup players have to work in part time jobs/coaching to pay for their own expenses as they earn peanuts in the national team. And I am very sure many players from the other countries have to work as well(Canada, Australia and Japan as well).

    The players who have the luxury of training fulltime without worrying about their living expenses are from CHina, Korea, Indonesia and Malaysia(if you are established enough like Hafiz Hashim).
    Yeah, the Chinese have a very efficient system. The only downside is there are a lot of ppl who drop out before they advance to the national team and as a result often have little to no job qualifications and have to struggle to make a living. In Germany, the national players are mostly "sports soldiers" (or however you try to translate that), meaning they're enlisted in the army and get paid - so as long as they play badminton, they have enough money for their expenses. On the downside, they can't make enough money to last them after they retire, so they have to study or work at the same time, limiting their training time. Although in Marc's case, that shouldn't be much - economics is easy^^ The hard part is getting a job afterwards
    There are also not too many coaching positions that are paid well. Badminton is pretty much a minor sport here, so I guess the only well-paid coaches are those of the national team and perhaps one or two in the national league.
    I really envy guys like JJS, LYD - they can follow their passion without worries, LYD probably earns a lot for advertisements as he is the pretty-boy of the Korean team Oh, how I wish I had discovered badminton earlier^^

  2. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lcleing View Post
    Hmm...Off topic but most of the players don't have the luxury of training full time as they are earning below average wage. If I remembered correctly, Hans Vittinghus has to work part time in a delivery company and train at the same time. Martin Luungard and Jens Eriksen have their daily jobs to take care of during their active playing days as well.
    Marc Zwiebler was an economic student(not sure if he has graduated) when he reached the final of denmark super series last year. Most of the Malaysia backup players have to work in part time jobs/coaching to pay for their own expenses as they earn peanuts in the national team. And I am very sure many players from the other countries have to work as well(Canada, Australia and Japan as well).

    The players who have the luxury of training fulltime without worrying about their living expenses are from CHina, Korea, Indonesia and Malaysia(if you are established enough like Hafiz Hashim).
    I know that HKV and Marc were part time, but I wasn't aware that Tago was aswell, oh well, I suppose as long as it doesn't affect your performance it shouldn't really matter as long as you can fit your training in as well as your job.

  3. #20
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    I understand from someone during TC10, that Marc Z' s family is rather rich,so no work worries for him.

  4. #21
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Interesting observations about working and playing... I believe many countries have their own unique ways of resolving that issue of earning a decent wage to support players... just wanted to share some info on that...

    I recall that in India for example (another developing Asian country that is trying hard to promote professional sportspersons and improve its overall showing in sports on the world stage) most players who represent the country or their state, are given jobs in one of the large Banks, or the Indian Railways, or their Oil Corporation, or the Home Guards etc. Many private corporate companies also hire these sportspersons as full-time employees on their payrolls, but allow them to concentrate wholly on their sports. In fact, the encouragement extends to even providing facilities or additional financial assistance that is related to training, equipment etc. Some of them are given ranks of officers and mid-level managers (often in the PR departments,) too. These jobs are theirs, not only until they are active sportspersons. They are encouraged to learn more and "grow" into their jobs as well.

    I am sure other countries have such a system as well, where Government and corporates pool their resources to support their sportspersons. It may not make them rich immediately, but it does take away the financial stress and motivate them to focus on their sports.
    Last edited by cobalt; 02-04-2011 at 10:10 AM. Reason: typo; my stpd keybd

  5. #22
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Interesting observations about working and playing... I believe many countries have their own unique ways of resolving that issue of earning a decent wage to support players... just wanted to share some info on that...

    I recall that in India for example (another developing Asian country that is trying hard to promote professional sportspersons and improve its overall showing in sports on the world stage) most players who represent the country or their state, are given jobs in one of the large Banks, or the Indian Railways, or their Oil Corporation, or the Home Guards etc. Many private corporate companies also hire these sportspersons as full-time employees on their payrolls, but allow them to concentrate wholly on their sports. In fact, the encouragement extends to even providing facilities or additional financial assistance that is related to training, equipment etc. Some of them are given ranks of officers and mid-level managers (often in the PR departments,) too. These jobs are theirs, not only until they are active sportspersons. They are encouraged to learn more and "grow" into their jobs as well.

    I am sure other countries have such a system as well, where Government and corporates pool their resources to support their sportspersons. It may not make them rich immediately, but it does take away the financial stress and motivate them to focus on their sports.
    Nice system. It does increase a company's image, after all, if a world class athlete 'works' there (or is supported by them until he quits, and then start working there for real^^). German companies want full-time employees, though. Focussing on your job is more important for (most of) them, especially the bigger ones. :/

  6. #23
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    The All England is just around the corner!!

    And if Tago dumps Peter Gade in the round of 16 (it could be a hard-fought match, and it may be Tago's trial by fire) he will next up meet Chen Long!

    The big Q: will Tago summon up the kami of magic hands to put it over the evergreen Peter Gade? Or will he go down in a jumble of goofy fuzzball grins??!?!?!

  7. #24
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Next instalment of this rivalry is due in less than 24 hours -- at the Indonesia Open 2011 PSS
    Any predictions???

  8. #25
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    Chen long is on form recently.. i predict he will win the match.

  9. #26
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    And the winner is..............
    george@chongwei !!!
    (because it was too easy for CL this time)
    (because Goofball turned up this time instead of KT)

  10. #27
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    [QUOTE=j4ckie;1618825]Yeah, the Chinese have a very efficient system. The only downside is there are a lot of ppl who drop out before they advance to the national team and as a result often have little to no job qualifications and have to struggle to make a living.

    They usually drop out when they are quite young if their coaches or players feel they have no good future. Their training is also part time. My friend who trained 9 years decided to drop out because at that time, a professional badminton player did not make much money and he did very well in school.

  11. #28
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    This is certainly DA time for kenichi to improve. After a magnificent performance in the AE, he certainly needs to buck up.

  12. #29
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    I wonder if the Japan team need to make arrangements for him to train full-time at least until the OG12?
    That would certainly increase his chances for a medal; he is at the right age to make a run for it, too.
    Obviously the CBA is doing all that they have to, for CL...

  13. #30
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Well, both these players are out of the 2011 World Championships at the first time of asking.

    Kenichi Tago had no answer to Ajay Jayaram from India, who surprisingly played an extremely aggressive game, cosntantly smashing and playing at a very fast tempo, turning Tago inside out in many points. Tago left his A game for too late in the second game, and Ajay was the deserving winner.

    An even bigger surprise was Chen Long's loss to Kevin Cordon from Gautemala. Kevin is going to have to deal with his new-found fame as a giant-killer! It was a pretty intense match, but what surprised me was Chen Long's apparent passiveness over many long stretches of play. There was not real attempt to impose his will on his opponent, but to give credit to Kevin, he played a very measured and attacking style of his own!

    What really impressed me however, was Chen Long's attitude. He never questioned line calls, was gracious and handled himself with great maturity throughout; he even let out a wry smile when he won a point he knew he should have lost, when Cordon had him completely wrong-footed, and Kevin accepted the moment too. Great sportsmanship from both players!

    Chen Long has kept up his reptation as a gentleman, and IMO this is very good for the future of badminton, in China and the world.

  14. #31
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    @Cobalt, I do not totally agree with you..

    Of course, Chen Long was gracious-But do you remember, towards the end of the game, he was was faulted twice for meeting the bird before it crossed to his side? And both times, umpire was correct. But Chen was really upset, arguing with umpire, also looking for support elsewhere outside court. To me, that does not look great.

    At the same time, I still remember Tago's gesture when the linesman made an error at a critical moment in All England final 2010. LCW's shot was clearly out and it was called in when the score was at 19-20. He did not make much of an issue even when ALL England was at stake at that call-he let LCW celibrate.
    NP

  15. #32
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    @Cobalt, I do not totally agree with you..

    Of course, Chen Long was gracious-But do you remember, towards the end of the game, he was was faulted twice for meeting the bird before it crossed to his side? And both times, umpire was correct. But Chen was really upset, arguing with umpire, also looking for support elsewhere outside court. To me, that does not look great.

    At the same time, I still remember Tago's gesture when the linesman made an error at a critical moment in All England final 2010. LCW's shot was clearly out and it was called in when the score was at 19-20. He did not make much of an issue even when ALL England was at stake at that call-he let LCW celibrate.
    NP
    You're quite right, nprince. As a matter of fact, I did notice that outburst from CL when he rushed the net, its just that I think we need to cut him some slack in that instance: he's young, was under tremendous pressure at the moment, and probably truly believed that he hit a good one. The replay in real time looked marginal, we could only tell for sure when it was played back in slow-mo. Again, I noticed that he kinda backed off from that attacking net-kill for many points thereafter; you could almost see him stopping himself! Round 1 in the WC, he's got his back against the wall... he must have been going nuts in his mind!

    Overall, I still think he's a very decent guy, and shows good attitude and ready smile.

    Oh, and I don't doubt that Tago is pretty cool himself! Read post #1 on this thread...

  16. #33
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nprince View Post
    @Cobalt, I do not totally agree with you..

    Of course, Chen Long was gracious-But do you remember, towards the end of the game, he was was faulted twice for meeting the bird before it crossed to his side? And both times, umpire was correct. But Chen was really upset, arguing with umpire, also looking for support elsewhere outside court. To me, that does not look great.

    At the same time, I still remember Tago's gesture when the linesman made an error at a critical moment in All England final 2010. LCW's shot was clearly out and it was called in when the score was at 19-20. He did not make much of an issue even when ALL England was at stake at that call-he let LCW celibrate.
    NP
    It's always upsetting when you're told your netkill was a fault - I also get very upset when my opponents (knowing fully well that they had no chance of winning that rally) try to tell me the shuttle wasn't over the net and it was a fault. Of course, we don't have umpires, so we have to discuss issues like that and can't rely on a third party.
    And as cobalt said - you NEVER feel it was a fault when you do a net kill, so you're always going to disagree with a call like that. I think a little arguing with the umpire is no big deal as long as you don't overdo it (the 2008 AE SF where LYD actually hit the Umpire's chair comes to mind ), especially when you're under pressure.

    Compared to other international players, CL shows great sportsmanship, as does Tago most of the time.

  17. #34
    Regular Member demolidor's Avatar
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    Nothing that can't be fixed with the next software update Just a little bug they accidentaly left in

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