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  1. #18
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    In China, from what I know, kids do not start specific badminton training before 12 years old. May be different in other countries.

    Talents are identified and recruited at young age to sports schools. There they engage in different sports activities to learn the body coordination and development of muscles. They could be engaged in track and field, football (soccer), basketball, swimming, etc... Different sport requires different sets of skills, body coordination and muscle groups.

  2. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by viver View Post
    In China, from what I know, kids do not start specific badminton training before 12 years old. May be different in other countries.

    Talents are identified and recruited at young age to sports schools. There they engage in different sports activities to learn the body coordination and development of muscles. They could be engaged in track and field, football (soccer), basketball, swimming, etc... Different sport requires different sets of skills, body coordination and muscle groups.
    I agree with all your statements excepts "do not start specific badminton training before 12 years old". I know an 11 years old girl who is playing excellently in Under 15 tournament. Zhao Jianhua said the best age to learn badminton is around 9/10 years old. So, I will let my son progress naturally so that he enjoys badminton. Player first, winner later.

  3. #20
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    One more thought:

    As Matt pointed out, LTAD is a general guideline. It can and should be applied fairly flexibly, depending on the individual athlete.

    In particular, if your son is self-motivated by technical badminton stuff -- e.g. he asks you how to play a certain shot -- then it doesn't make sense to withhold that information from him. The athlete's own motivation is very important when deciding what to do.

  4. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sysoh View Post
    I agree with all your statements excepts "do not start specific badminton training before 12 years old". I know an 11 years old girl who is playing excellently in Under 15 tournament. Zhao Jianhua said the best age to learn badminton is around 9/10 years old. So, I will let my son progress naturally so that he enjoys badminton. Player first, winner later.
    My information comes from a China National team coach and also from a coach involved in the China Youth Badminton Development programme. If you have information from Zhao Jianhua (whom I see as one of the all time best players), regarding the ideal time to start training, I would seriously consider it. I believe you will make the best decision regarding your kid's future.

    As for the 11 year old girl doing well in a U-15 tournament, can't comment that much. Different places, different requirements. Players mature at different times and has to be viewed individually. Take Chinese players for example, Lin Ying, former China Ladies doubles and mixed-doubles player was playing for the national team at the age of 14, Han Aiping was representing China at 16, Wang Lin at 14, was competing in the Youth World Championships. And not to mention the Korean kids that came to Canada, a few years back for Canada Open and beat our national ladies team players.

  5. #22
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    Hi,

    To be honest from watching that clip, your son has a fantastic forehand clear technique... His arm positions, his stance, hit, follow through is all perfect... the reason for looking like he may need improvement is just because of his age... at that age his wrist is not full developed. He just hasn't fully physically developed to be able to perform powerful shots.

    I think there, we could be watching a future superstar
    Thanks

  6. #23
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    Good one. Let him enjoy the game. More punches to the back hand of course for advantage play. All he need to do is move to the front for a kill.

  7. #24
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    amazing video of your son.. loved it...

  8. #25
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    Default Looking for advice to improve my son's skills, games and tactics

    Hi all,
    2 years have passed. My son is 8 years old now. He has training almost every Saturday and Sunday for these 2 years. However, the progress seems slow. Could you give me your professional advice to improve his skills, games and tactics? This is the youtube link for a under-9 tournament that he took part 9 days ago: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k106aA0wvTc

    I will appreciate if you can point out my son's weakness. If you can give me tips on how to improve his weakness, that will be extremely great!

  9. #26
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    Btw, my son was wearing black shirt in this video.

  10. #27
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    I can't point out your son's weakness, but YOU gotta stop saying DON'T.

    Assignment for you is to frame every suggestion of improvement that you think he needs to do into a positive. Instead of telling him NOT to do something, tell him to go do something.

  11. #28
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    I would be fascinated to know what you meant by his progress is "slow", and what you expect of him.

    To me, it looks as though your son is moving pretty quickly around the court. He hits the shuttle nicely on the forehand side, and he won the match. Lots of positives

    He is 8. I think he is doing great! Your job is not to pressure him too much, make sure he enjoys playing and then KEEPS PLAYING, because hes enjoying it! Worrying about technical defects at this age is unnecessary. He is using some good grips and good footwork techniques - these are the most important things for someone so young!

    I hope he grows up to enjoy the sport

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borbor View Post
    I can't point out your son's weakness, but YOU gotta stop saying DON'T.

    Assignment for you is to frame every suggestion of improvement that you think he needs to do into a positive. Instead of telling him NOT to do something, tell him to go do something.
    Hi Borbor! Thanks for your comments. I think this is good for me. It would be good to know from you on how to convey the same message positively.

    e.g. instead of "Don't hit to the mid-court", I should say "Lob/clear it to the corner of the rear court"?

    It would be helpful for me to learn from you on how to do this in a positive way.

  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I would be fascinated to know what you meant by his progress is "slow", and what you expect of him.

    To me, it looks as though your son is moving pretty quickly around the court. He hits the shuttle nicely on the forehand side, and he won the match. Lots of positives

    He is 8. I think he is doing great! Your job is not to pressure him too much, make sure he enjoys playing and then KEEPS PLAYING, because hes enjoying it! Worrying about technical defects at this age is unnecessary. He is using some good grips and good footwork techniques - these are the most important things for someone so young!

    I hope he grows up to enjoy the sport
    Many thanks for your sincere inputs. I agree with you on most of them. He enjoys playing at the moment. And he is looking forward to every tournament. As you can see from the video, he is so energitic and motivated when playing in the tournament.

    When I said slow progress, it is because I know many same age group players from Malaysia and Singapore are extremely good at this age. However, they trained very hard. 6 days in a week instead of just Saturday and Sunday (2 days) as my son.

    Also, it is relatively slow if we compared these 2 milestone videos:
    (1) Learning after 5 months (when he was 5.5 yo): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATLs3-xWEPo
    (2) Learning after 2.5 years (now at 8 yo): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k106aA0wvTc

    However, I should admit that he matures slow as compared with his peers. Somehow, this is good for him to enjoy his childhood for not maturing too fast.

    It would be good to know some tips to train on his weakness while ensuring him to enjoy his games. I would prefer him to think himself as I know inputs from me might not make him an independent thinker.
    Inputs/tips from you guys will be great as I might not be able to see the right areas to focus as I am not trained in badminton though I am crazy about this sport.

    Rest assured that I will listen to your advice to let him having a memorable and enjoyable childhood.

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sysoh View Post
    Hi Borbor! Thanks for your comments. I think this is good for me. It would be good to know from you on how to convey the same message positively.

    e.g. instead of "Don't hit to the mid-court", I should say "Lob/clear it to the corner of the rear court"?

    It would be helpful for me to learn from you on how to do this in a positive way.
    It's really easy. Focus on what needs to be done; everything else is just a distraction. No one needs to be told to NOT do something -- how is that even productive?

    BTW, you can't compare the progress of your child who trains three times less than kids his age that trains 6 times a week. What's the point of even making such a comparison?

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