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  1. #35
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    Are you sure top players like to string additional cross starting from b8 instead of b9?

    Anyone here do so at b8?


    Quote Originally Posted by kakinami View Post
    It adds a stiffer string plane to the racket. Most top players like it, adds more control to the racket, since they generate a lot of power.
    Quote Originally Posted by mail43249 View Post
    I just purchased a used Yonex Racket and it was strung

    The last horizontal string is on the 8th hole counting from bottom, rather than on the 9th hole as recommended by Yonex. As a result, the single string grommet is stretched to acccomodate the extra string.

    Why did the stringer spend that extra effort to run another string beyond what is necessary? Is that ignorance?

    So question is how does that affect the racket performance anyway?

  2. #36
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    Haven't heard any complaints at US Open's or Pan American Championships in the past 3 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by txv611 View Post
    Are you sure top players like to string additional cross starting from b8 instead of b9?

    Anyone here do so at b8?

  3. #37
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CovinaStringer View Post
    I totally agree. I would like to eventually get certified as a Yonex stringer.
    So would I, but it would have to be via a video submission.

    I'll have a wander down to see the stringers on Thursday at the All England and see what they do w.r.t top-down or bottom-up.

    Personally, I've always done top-down with a starting knot, and I've only ever broken ONE racket out of the 200+ I've strung; luckily it was one of mine, and it broke near the bottom for some reason. I never go over 28 lbs for my top cross and increase by 1 lb each cross until I reach the specified tension if it's more than 28. My machine's a cranker, but it's overclocked to "land" on the correct tension after clamp shuffling.

  4. #38
    Regular Member CovinaStringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    So would I, but it would have to be via a video submission.

    I'll have a wander down to see the stringers on Thursday at the All England and see what they do w.r.t top-down or bottom-up.

    Personally, I've always done top-down with a starting knot, and I've only ever broken ONE racket out of the 200+ I've strung; luckily it was one of mine, and it broke near the bottom for some reason. I never go over 28 lbs for my top cross and increase by 1 lb each cross until I reach the specified tension if it's more than 28. My machine's a cranker, but it's overclocked to "land" on the correct tension after clamp shuffling.
    Do you know Liam Nolan of the UKRSA? You might want to contact him.

  5. #39
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Do you know Liam Nolan of the UKRSA? You might want to contact him.
    Yes, I do... very well, in fact - I've been certified by him both as a Club Stringer and a Professional Stringer.

    With regard to certification, I can confirm that badminton is not well represented - I was the only one of eight on our course that had strung even one badminton racket, and no exemplar badminton rackets were strung during the course.

    Liam told me it's extremely unusual for anyone to learn stringing on badminton rackets, as I did, but that it would stand me in good stead because badminton stringing requires the more care. When the odd tennis racket comes my way, it's almost a joke how easy it is compared to baddy.

  6. #40
    Regular Member CovinaStringer's Avatar
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    Badminton has it's nuances, almost like stringing back in the old days (older than me), with the wooden rackets and more shared holes. I believe, fundamentally, if you can string a badminton racket you can string almost anything else. I just wish I can string more badminton rackets than the occasional racket compared to Tennis, so I can get more experience.

  7. #41
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    I tried asking our local stringers in my country to string according to Yonex Instructions for different rackets and was plainly rejected.

    They only want to string it the way they have been doing for years and refuses to acknowledge the recommendations from manufacturers. Is learning new methods very difficult even for seasoned stringers?

    Now, can anyone tell me why yonex has different recommendations for diff rackets as per below?

    http://www.yonex.com/badminton/strin...ons/index.html

  8. #42
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mail43249 View Post
    I tried asking our local stringers in my country to string according to Yonex Instructions for different rackets and was plainly rejected.

    They only want to string it the way they have been doing for years and refuses to acknowledge the recommendations from manufacturers. Is learning new methods very difficult even for seasoned stringers?

    Now, can anyone tell me why yonex has different recommendations for diff rackets as per below?

    http://www.yonex.com/badminton/strin...ons/index.html
    Yonex methods might not be better. in fact, i still don't see the reason doing the outer 3 mains.

    there are different methods for different rackets in the Yonex instructions because they have different number of shared/non-shared holes.

  9. #43
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    Kwun,

    Thanks for sharing. Personally, do you string extra cross starting at b8 instead of b9?
    What is your opinion on this?


    TQ

  10. #44
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mail43249 View Post
    Kwun,

    Thanks for sharing. Personally, do you string extra cross starting at b8 instead of b9?
    What is your opinion on this?


    TQ
    i haven't tried starting at B8 myself. personally i don't like too stiff a stringbed which seems to be AK's reason for starting at B8. i always start at B9.

  11. #45
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mail43249 View Post
    I tried asking our local stringers in my country to string according to Yonex Instructions for different rackets and was plainly rejected.

    They only want to string it the way they have been doing for years and refuses to acknowledge the recommendations from manufacturers. Is learning new methods very difficult even for seasoned stringers?
    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    Yonex methods might not be better. in fact, i still don't see the reason doing the outer 3 mains.
    The main reason for doing the 3 outer mains as such is for structural integrity purposes and from personal experience the non-Yonex recommended pattern does change the shape (looks a little more oval at the top as opposed to square) of the strung racquet very slightly from the unstrung shape, especially if the racquet was not strung with a 6 point support machine.

    The most important thing in this case (for the SE Asian stringers) is that if the stringer will be willing to string starting from the centre mains and end on the edges. A lot of these stringers will insist on stringing from one side to the other because they only want to use just one clamp for the whole job and it really does save them a lot of time per racquet while they're at it. Without ample protection this method is not good for the racquet frame at all. The stresses during stringing is not balanced from one side to the other as opposed to stringing from the centre out.

  12. #46
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blitzzards View Post
    The main reason for doing the 3 outer mains as such is for structural integrity purposes and from personal experience the non-Yonex recommended pattern does change the shape (looks a little more oval at the top as opposed to square) of the strung racquet very slightly from the unstrung shape, especially if the racquet was not strung with a 6 point support machine.
    i am still not convinced. i have done both and never seen the difference.

    The most important thing in this case (for the SE Asian stringers) is that if the stringer will be willing to string starting from the centre mains and end on the edges. A lot of these stringers will insist on stringing from one side to the other because they only want to use just one clamp for the whole job and it really does save them a lot of time per racquet while they're at it. Without ample protection this method is not good for the racquet frame at all. The stresses during stringing is not balanced from one side to the other as opposed to stringing from the centre out.
    personally i have seen a lot of stringers string their rackets (SE Asian or not), and never seen one who starts the main from the side. everyone of them starts from the middle. in fact, starting from the middle saves more time. less string to pull through.

  13. #47
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    I don't know about anyone else, but i find i can get the string to sit neater against the frame when i do the YY patterm

  14. #48
    Regular Member Blitzzards's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    i am still not convinced. i have done both and never seen the difference.
    Do you mean "both" as in doing the "non-Yonex pattern" both with and without 6 point support to compare the difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    personally i have seen a lot of stringers string their rackets (SE Asian or not), and never seen one who starts the main from the side. everyone of them starts from the middle. in fact, starting from the middle saves more time. less string to pull through.
    There certainly are a lot of SEA stringers but particularly those who own those cheaper [Ashaway] machines which comes with a pair of sliding clamps who would remove one of the clamps for stringing convenience (less blockage) and string using only one clamp, thus starting the main from the side. You may not have witnessed these stringers in the upper hemisphere region (Hong Kong, etc) but we who live nearer to the equator (Brunei, Singapore, Malaysia) have these kinds of stringers all over us. The string job can be identified by noticing that the knot at the frame bottom is a larger starting knot rather than a smaller neater finishing knot.

    I apologise for this rant but the worst stringers I have seen are the Indian stringers, who would promise one thing and produce a totally different result such as asking for 30lbs and then receiving 24lbs and asking for Yonex pattern then receiving the lazy 2 knot pattern. Worst case I have witnessed is the customer asking why the stringers didn't follow the customer's request and them arguing that they have never been requested as such in the first place

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    So would I, but it would have to be via a video submission.

    I'll have a wander down to see the stringers on Thursday at the All England and see what they do w.r.t top-down or bottom-up.

    Personally, I've always done top-down with a starting knot, and I've only ever broken ONE racket out of the 200+ I've strung; luckily it was one of mine, and it broke near the bottom for some reason. I never go over 28 lbs for my top cross and increase by 1 lb each cross until I reach the specified tension if it's more than 28. My machine's a cranker, but it's overclocked to "land" on the correct tension after clamp shuffling.
    Did you watch the way the Yonex stringers strung rackets at the AE? I meant to but got sidetracked by the badminton and the Yonex racket stand.

    Personally I always start at the bottom then work up and put +2 lbs on the cross and have broken no rackets as of yet, but I have only strung somewhere in the region of 50 rackets. Also my rackets have always come out the same length as the unstrung version, so I have stuck with what works. I always follow the Yonex stringing patterns for each racket and will do my best to look for other rackets stringing patterns. If not I follow the most logical pattern.

    I also started on badminton rackets, tennis and squash rackets are really easy by comparison, but I don't entirely trust my machine at tennis racket tensions (so avoid them).

    Most of the UK private stringers have all been very good, all badminton players and they understand what the player wants. Have no idea of local shops having never used them.

  16. #50
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Did you watch the way the Yonex stringers strung rackets at the AE? I meant to but got sidetracked by the badminton and the Yonex racket stand.
    I must admit I sat down between courts two and three and just drifted away - it was wall-to-wall awesomeness, so there was no time to traipse off looking at stringers or exhibits!

    I did hear Gill say in commentary that 460+ rackets had been done, and that was in the middle of semi-finals, so they must have reached at least 500 by the end of the tourney.

    Wrt patterns, I obey rigidly the Yonex code except in very few cases; the only rackets that require me to get creative are the 96-holers (Forza/Ashaway) and the daft Babolat X-Feels - either of which I do as a one-piece with a starting clamp.
    Last edited by Mark A; 03-15-2011 at 12:09 PM.

  17. #51
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    I was glad to be there at the AE from QFs to the Finals and agree it was awesome. Also I did observe and speak to the Yonex stringer outside the entrance to block 2 who was stringing for Yonex customers. He was mainly doing them at 24 - 26 lbs on the ES5Pro and was starting out from the centre mains, and doing the crosses from bottoms up. He didn't have the swivel clamps installed and just tended to use either one or two fly clamps. I asked him too about the tension for the crosses but he kept the mains and crosses at the same tension and not at 10% extra poundage. His answer was that it didn't make any difference and that the iso shape was not distorted. Not sure if that perspective applied to the tournament stringers though!

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