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  1. #35
    Regular Member wilfredlgf's Avatar
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    What kind of mentality is that ENP, mind telling us? And maybe you can let us know how you connect that to the energy problem or nuclear power in general?

  2. #36
    Regular Member red00ecstrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avenger View Post
    the main problem is not about the power plant itself the main problem is the people
    couldn't agree more!
    three mile island and chernobl disaster were caused by people.

  3. #37
    Regular Member red00ecstrat's Avatar
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    Murphy's Law - Anything that can go wrong will go wrong!

  4. #38
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Default Alstom sees continued demand for nuclear power in India, China

    Alstom sees continued demand for nuclear power in India, China

    From: The Hindu Business Line.
    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...?homepage=true

    New Delhi, April 12:

    Alstom S.A.'s chief, Mr Patrick Kron, said the nuclear incident in Japan could pose questions on the choice of electricity made by countries, but envisages continued demand in India and China for nuclear power in the long run.

    The company has a presence across all the segments of electricity generation equipment — thermal, hydro, nuclear and renewables.

    It is therefore “adequately hedged” in terms of being able to respond to demand, whatever shape it takes in terms of fuel choices, the Chairman and CEO of the €10.4-billion French power engineering and train manufacturer said in an interaction here.

    Across much of Europe and the US, the nuclear incident playing out at Japan's earthquake-hit Fukushima Daiichi station has provided opponents of nuclear power with their strongest arguments since the Chernobyl meltdown.

    Currently, one out of every three nuclear plants in the world runs on turbines supplied by Alstom, which is the third-largest power-equipment maker globally after General Electric of the US and Germany's Siemens.

    In India, Alstom is part of a three-way joint venture involving state-owned atomic generator Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) and Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd to make large sized turbines for upcoming nuclear projects. Mr Kron said the venture was on track and gearing up to execute orders. It has already got an order to build two turbine generators with a capacity of 700 MW each that will be installed at Kalpakkam.

    Metro rail projects

    Mr Kron said the firm is also open to making acquisitions in India. Apart from new locomotive projects and refurbishment orders from the Indian Railways, the company is strongly focussed on metro rail projects across India, he said.

    Alstom has already bagged a Rs 1,471-crore contract to design, manufacture and commission coaches for the Chennai Metro rail project and is building a manufacturing unit there to supply coaches. “The Chennai manufacturing facility would be completed by early 2013,” Mr Kron said. He also hinted at plans to set up a wind power equipment manufacturing facility in India.

    Having started out in India way back in 1911, Alstom has marked the completion of 100 years in India this year and Mr Kron's visit here is to commemorate the landmark. “We have competition, we have opportunities… in the next 100 years we are going to generate more opportunities than the previous 100 years.”

  5. #39
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Default China’s nuclear freeze to last until 2012

    China’s nuclear freeze to last until 2012


    By Leslie Hook in Beijing
    Published: April 12 2011 18:47 | Last updated: April 12 2011 18:47

    Full report:
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/68694fe0-6...#axzz1JLcA5gpx

    Please respect FT.com's ts&cs and copyright policy which allow you to: share links; copy content for personal use; & redistribute limited extracts. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights or use this link to reference the article - http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/68694fe0-6...#ixzz1JLcbZuhZ

    Abstract:

    China, which accounts for 40 per cent of planned new reactors globally, halted approvals for new projects last month ...

  6. #40
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Default California Gov. Jerry Brown signs into law ambitious renewable energy mandate

    California Gov. Jerry Brown signs into law ambitious renewable energy mandate

    http://www.mercurynews.com/business/...nclick_check=1

    By Dana Hull

    dhull@mercurynews.com

    Posted: 04/12/2011 02:38:21 PM PDT

    California's cleantech economy took center stage Tuesday as Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law an ambitious mandate that requires the state's utilities to get 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

    The move, which gives California the most aggressive renewable energy requirement in the nation, is expected to create cleantech jobs as utilities race to secure contracts with clean energy power producers.

    "Instead of taking oil from thousands of miles away we're taking the sun," said Brown before the signing ceremony at SunPower's (SPWRA) new solar manufacturing facility in Milpitas. "This is about California leading the country, and America potentially leading the world."

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu also brought good news Tuesday, and announced at the signing that SunPower and NRG Solar have been awarded a $1.2 billion conditional loan guarantee from the Department of Energy for the California Valley Solar Ranch, a 250-megawatt power plant in San Luis Obispo County. The solar plant is expected to create 350 jobs and generate enough power for 60,000 homes.

    "The efficiencies created by the California Valley Solar Ranch project will help lower the cost of solar power and encourage more utility-scale solar deployment," said Chu. "The project will also create hundreds of jobs and will generate clean, renewable power to fulfill increased energy demand."


    San Jose-based SunPower designs and manufactures solar cells and solar panels for residential, commercial and utility clients. The company has more than 5,100 employees worldwide, including about 4,300 in the Philippines, where SunPower has two factories near Manila.

    But with the solar market in California rapidly expanding, SunPower is eager to manufacture closer to home and recently opened its first domestic solar manufacturing facility in Milpitas. The Milpitas factory is operated in partnership with Flextronics, an electronics manufacturing services provider, and is expected to create 100 jobs.

    Under current California law, the state's three largest utilities are required to procure 20 percent of their power from renewable sources. In 2009, former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed an executive order that raised the bar to 33 percent by 2020.

    But Brown's signing of the law--his first major legislation since taking office--carries far more weight than an executive order. It also extends to all utilities in the state, including municipal utilities in Palo Alto, Santa Clara and Sacramento.

    "This is going to electrify California's economy and reduce air pollution and global warming," said Jim Metropulos of the Sierra Club, which has been advocating for the law.

    Renewable energy sources like solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, wave and tidal power and small hydroelectric dams all count toward meeting the law, called the "Renewable Portfolio Standard.'' Utilities can use a mix of renewable power sources to meet the new goals. Solar power is expected to be a big winner.

    "Solar is much more valuable to utilities," said Adam Browning of the Vote Solar Initiative in San Francisco. "The sun shines during the middle of the day, which corresponds to peak demand."

    The renewables law was also heralded by consumer advocates, because it contains provisions designed to protect consumers from rising and often volatile fossil fuel prices and requires state regulators with the California Public Utilities Commission to approve any renewable energy contracts.

    "We'll make sure that ratepayers are protected," said CPUC Commissioner Mike Florio, who was a consumer advocate for three decades. "Part of our charge in implementing the bill is establishing cost control measures."

    Tuesday also marked a big victory for State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto), who has pushed for the 33 percent standard for four years.

    "We want the commitment to renewable energy to be real, but we also want the flexibility to make it work," said Simitian. "If we send a clear signal to the market, the market will respond--with investment, tax revenue and jobs."

  7. #41
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Default Scottish Government initiative to move to renewable energy

    The Scottish Government has outlined a very ambitious plan to move over the bulk of energy consumption to renewable/clean energy sources by 2020.

    Read the entire paper here:
    http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Bu...mes/renewables

    Abstract:

    The Scottish Government commitment to increase the amount of electricity and heat generated from renewable sources is a vital part of the response to climate change. The headline targets of 80% gross electricity consumption and 11% heat demand met from renewable sources by 2020 have spatial planning implications that need to be addressed in development plans.

  8. #42
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    I am still surprised that the TEPCO CEO is still there. Whatever it is those who approve it should stay near the building. Fair for everyone.

  9. #43
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    I have a question. So many people say electric car ares green. However in California, I think 80% the electricity comes from oil . Does anyone ever calculate what the real mileage per gallon? I mean how many kilowatts can be generated from 1 gallon of oil, and how far can 1 kilowatt go for an electric car. I always doubt if an electric car can be greener than a Hybrid like Prius.

  10. #44
    Regular Member wilfredlgf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by extremenanopowe View Post
    I am still surprised that the TEPCO CEO is still there. Whatever it is those who approve it should stay near the building. Fair for everyone.
    Did the TEPCO CEO cause the earthquake and the subsequent tsunami?

    Quote Originally Posted by Qidong View Post
    I have a question. So many people say electric car ares green. However in California, I think 80% the electricity comes from oil . Does anyone ever calculate what the real mileage per gallon? I mean how many kilowatts can be generated from 1 gallon of oil, and how far can 1 kilowatt go for an electric car. I always doubt if an electric car can be greener than a Hybrid like Prius.
    Good question that, wondered about it myself. Perhaps what you meant is the entire energy generation and supply chain and I'd say it must begin at the very bottom - where did the car get its electricity from.

    Green would mean differently to different context I'd imagine - either it's minimal to no polution (biomass, solar power) or very high long term output (nuclear fission, fusion).

    In this case electric cars would be very green in the first criteria but would be in the grey area for the second. I thought it'd be strange to call the car green if the electricity it got its power from is a massive coal energy plant.

  11. #45
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    I'd just like to point out a few things.

    Wind, water and sunlight are available in most parts of the world. Wind and sunlight is free (as of yet ) and water costs some.

    The cost of gas (fossil fuel) is rising appreciably each year, and no one can guarantee that the cost will remain at current levels over the next say, 5 years. This obviously affects the cost of transportation for everything, including (among others) manufacturing parts, food, grains, people, livestock, tourists, plastic toys, badminton players, racquets, politicians, green party candidates and astronauts.

    Regardless of what the government and their statistical machines tell me, I know that I am spending roughly 20% more each month that I was some 30 months ago, for the same or less quantity, and probably lesser quality.

    Along the way, everyone adds a penny or a fraction to "adjust for inflation" or "adjust for projected costs" or any such thing.

    We can continue to split hairs about the cost of delivery per erg (or whatever) of energy using renewable sources. Meanwhile, the vested interests (read: big business, governments, financial houses etc) will keep waiting until they have generated enough critical mass in various ways to ensure that they are able to extract the same profit margin out of renewable sources, as they have been doing from the business of fossil fuel.

    It's not that alternative sources of energy are not viable. It's that there is not enough profit in them. Yet. That is the unpalatable truth. That is the reality we need to face up to.

  12. #46
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    There's a lot of criticism on TEPCO bosses after the tsunami. Do you have the time read the news?

  13. #47
    Regular Member wilfredlgf's Avatar
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    Of course I did.

    The government of Japan approved TEPCO's dumping of the radioactive water into the sea.

    I bet you missed out that bit?

    And what does that have to do with nuclear power in the nutshell?

    If you really feel strongly about nuclear power why not talk about the disadvantages as well as alternatives that you think are suitable?

    Cobalt made key statement regarding 'profit' within power generation.

  14. #48
    Regular Member extremenanopowe's Avatar
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    For disadvantages, all I can think is suffering for those affected. Their genes will also go to the next generation and more suffering from cancer for generations to come. No biggie. Alternative? Sun and Wind of course.

    If you study ecomonics, there's a break even point for everything, if it can't be achieved over a period of years, then forget it.

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    ...perhaps it's not called the break even point.

    It may well be the tipping point...and when it tips over, solar energy is the only way to go. I've mentioned before, wind power (lack of wind) is not as viable as solar power (abundant till it flares out.).

    I believe (much) progress has been been made the last 18 months or so regarding solar power. Solar generators has gotten much more compact now with higher outputs or storing capacities.

    Bill Gates has been investing in ''Plug Power (a kind of miniaturization of solar generators)'' since the get go. When ''it'' reaches the tipping point, don't be surprise at all to see who's in the forefront ''again'' in another technology.

    Until then, folks!

  16. #50
    Regular Member wilfredlgf's Avatar
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    I read from RAWK posts regarding energy incentives in UK in the form of selling electricity back into the grid - for example if you have a couple of solar panels or wind turbine, the excess energy can be sold back to the power company as rebates or tax breaks.

    Sounds a good idea as it could encourage people to start using alternatives to supplement the existing power generated by the plants. In some ways helps makes them more resilient to power outtages (even for a short few days), as well as earn some extra bucks to pay for a bit of the grocery. All that can be made more and more affordable with better technology - miniaturisation, efficiency etc.

    This would require legislative mandates though - power consumption to energy companies means dollar signs, the same who contribute to campaign war chests.

  17. #51
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilfredlgf View Post
    I read from RAWK posts regarding energy incentives in UK in the form of selling electricity back into the grid - for example if you have a couple of solar panels or wind turbine, the excess energy can be sold back to the power company as rebates or tax breaks.

    Sounds a good idea as it could encourage people to start using alternatives to supplement the existing power generated by the plants. In some ways helps makes them more resilient to power outtages (even for a short few days), as well as earn some extra bucks to pay for a bit of the grocery. All that can be made more and more affordable with better technology - miniaturisation, efficiency etc.

    This would require legislative mandates though - power consumption to energy companies means dollar signs, the same who contribute to campaign war chests.
    This has been implemented in Ontario for some time now. The supplier here (Hydro One) calls it the Feed-In Tariff Programme.
    http://www.hydroone.com/Generators/P...-inTariff.aspx

    This has provided some incentive to companies building solar plants:
    http://www.cleanenergyauthority.com/...roject-011711/

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