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  1. #1
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    Default What Makes A Good Badminton Racket

    I'm relatively new to this forum, so apologies if this has already been posted before:
    http://badminton-racket.blogspot.com...on-racket.html

    I think the blogger makes excellent points. Even though the blog post was made over 1 year ago, the same points apply today.

    For those who can't be bothered reading through that thesis (haha), here are some of the key quotes:

    With so many rackets available these days, all promising faster smashes, more control, more consistency for your game, more aerodynamic capabilities, lightning reactions and god knows what else, it can be very difficult to know what to go for. The truth is that the badminton racket is just a tool of the trade. Can it make you a better player? It can improve what you already have by a slight amount, that is the only truth in the hyped up marketing world we live in.
    A good badminton racket is a low work racket. If you hit a clear it should land in the back tramlines more often than not if you have the right technique and positioning.
    Take this as an example. Give an advanced player a 10 steel beginners racket with factory strung strings at about 15lbs tension when are used to playing with a stiff framed high technology racket strung at 30lbs. What happens? Well at first the player thinks, god this feels ****. Their shots are not as consistent as they normally are. The shuttle is not going where they want it to. However, after about an hour things are improving. The player has got used to the new racket and the string tension, and while it still does not feel right, the shots are becoming more consistent and accurate. They have already compensated for the difference. After two hours of play there is now not much difference at all. All the clears are landing in the right place, and the smashes are going where they intended them to. The point i am trying to make is that good players can play with anything and make it work. The racket will still feel hard to work with, it would be high work racket, but the result is around about the same.
    So back to the question of what makes a good badminton racket? The answer is you do. In most of my racket reviews i mention power and control, and that is a bit misleading because power and control come from technique, and yours is different to mine, so what i think is a powerful racket may not be the same for you. In reality no racket is "powerful" it just makes it easier to get some power that is generated by yourself. Same applies to control, you have to create your own control, the racket will be useful for making it easier to control the shuttle if the head is stable on impact. You can then get more consistency with your technique. Remember though that it is the strings that connect with the shuttle, and they play a much bigger part in terms of control.
    I like high tension strings, i believe they give me more control over the shuttle. Some people argue that this is not the case, and that low tension is better for control because the shuttle is in contact with the strings for longer. The truth is that high tension does give more control and it comes down to the movement of the strings on impact. If you have loose strings then they will move more on impact. This means you do not have a totally stable base when you hit the shuttle, which equals less control. Tight strings will not move around as much so there is more control available. The racket simply holds the strings in place, so if you add a stable frame to all of this then you will have even more control.

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    it's the player on form that make the racket look good! even international players have different choice of racket according to their preference... if you play well and on form, then your racket is good!! hahaha..

    I met so many player that always blame string, racket, lightings, shorts, shoe, socks, etc... but seldom blame their skills!!

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    Regular Member Badmintan's Avatar
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    3 words:

    High

    Modulus

    Graphite

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^^
    lol ... one word: woven

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    What makes a racket good is the interface between the racket grip and the floor.

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    One piece, tight strings, grip, weight, balance.

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    I don't think anyone is actually reading the blog post (in the link) properly. Let me simplify it (with some of my views put in too):
    1. The "latest and greatest" racket is mostly all about marketing.
    2. If you buy the "latest and greatest" racket after reading "amazing" reviews about it, you're going to be bias when you review it (too).
    3. The "latest and greatest" racket isn't going to improve your game much. In fact, it's probably not going to improve it at all. If you "think" you are improving, it almost always means that you are getting technically better or more fit etc, not because of the "latest and greatest" racket. If you've been told that the "latest and greatest" racket is "incredibly powerful", then when you smash etc, you'll likely only "feel" that you're getting more power, when in fact, it's just a "louder" noise. The speed of your smashes could even be slower than your average.
    4. Don't get caught up in the marketing and waste your money. If you can afford it (or if it's your hobby to collect rackets and not actually try to become technically better), then waste away!

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    So, with such pessimism about "new and improved" rackets, we're supposed to just stick with our steel shaft and steel frame rackets and be happy with them?

    I'm being facetious of course, but what I would suggest is take a more objective approach where we separate the marketing double speak (which we know Japanese companies are so good at) from the technology, and assess the technological improvements (if any) on its own merits.
    Last edited by visor; 04-22-2011 at 04:22 PM.

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    the answer to the question is quite simple really.

    A good racket is one that suits your style of play, as well as being durable, and costs as much as you willing to pay.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    I'm being facetious of course, but what I would suggest is take a more objective approach where we separate the marketing double speak (which we know Japanese companies are so good at) from the technology, and assess the technological improvements (if any) on its own merits.
    But then that's exactly what I'm trying to portray. I think many need to be more objective when it comes to assessing a badminton racket. If you are a good player with a powerful smash, then a racket isn't going to make much difference at all. Sure, racket technology does improve in general over time - I don't dispute that. What I am trying to emphasise is that the player is infinitely more important than the racket. If you're not getting very powerful smashes, work on your technique. Don't expect the "latest and greatest" racket to give you more power "just like that", and don't mimick the badminton racket companies' "brain-washing" people into thinking it does.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssj100 View Post
    Don't expect the "latest and greatest" racket to give you more power "just like that", and don't mimick the badminton racket companies' "brain-washing" people into thinking it does.
    Agree. And Yonex over the past few years has been particularly guilty of this, what with Trivoltage, sound filter, nanopreme, etc.

    Victor on the other hand has been rather straightforward in presenting its technology. And now makes it easier for the user to select their rackets according to their 5S matrix: smash, speed, stability, sweet spot, smoothness.

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