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  1. #18
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    Default victor pre-stretch function

    how do you use pre-stretch function on Victor machine? would you set that function once, before stringing or every time you pull the string and clamp? thanks for all advices.

  2. #19
    Regular Member Sgbad's Avatar
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    Set the pre-stretch value before you start stringing.

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    Thanks SGbad for quick respond.

  4. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by maa2003 View Post
    it can not be compared Joe ...

    the thread starter is owner of www.kedaiangkasa.com - one of the online reference for genuine badminton stuffs in Indonesia.
    just behind the shop, it has 6 or 7 lanes of full carpet flooring badminton hall, Taufik Hidayat ever played at this hall.
    so having a good and accurate machine is a compulsory especially if there is a competition in the badminton hall.

    boss BengGuan, please show us the other new machine (7031) picture, side-by-side with this 7032 ...
    Does the Victor C-7032 have the same problem as the Yonex ES5ProTech in that you cannot pull the first cross by itself without breaking it? People always say the top end machines are so strong, but really the problem seems to me that some of those machines pull too quickly up to the calibrated tension. Has that problem been addressed now?

    As Kwun has mentioned in this thread and others, this Victor model is a dream machine for many. With it, there is no fretting about upgrading to different clamp systems, after market tension heads and other mods. Everything on it is already state of the art.

    Is such a machine always bought by people in the badminton business or does an individual every now and then buy something like this? At $3,800 USD it's certainly hard for any individual to justify, but maybe there is at least one BC member who has indulged at this level just for personal use?

  5. #22
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    bsmith, I think Pete LSD might be the guy you're looking for, he purchased a C-7032 (I think so) which is almost the same machine but one generation older. It has hold down instead of suspension though.

  6. #23
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Does the Victor C-7032 have the same problem as the Yonex ES5ProTech in that you cannot pull the first cross by itself without breaking it? People always say the top end machines are so strong, but really the problem seems to me that some of those machines pull too quickly up to the calibrated tension.
    If this is a problem for you, you should have a look at getting a manual machine with the best possible mounting system and putting a WISE tension head on it - the WISE has three speed settings, and on the occasions I used them I always changed to "first gear" for pulling starting knots. Even with my crank I take that string very slowly, often with repeated pulls, to make absolutely sure the knot won't snap or fall in.

    I haven't yet tried the ES5P, but from memory the old ES5 did pull very quick and hard (in those days I never used any high tensions, so I never had a problem); DinkALot tells my the ES5P is much the same.

  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    If this is a problem for you, you should have a look at getting a manual machine with the best possible mounting system and putting a WISE tension head on it - the WISE has three speed settings, and on the occasions I used them I always changed to "first gear" for pulling starting knots. Even with my crank I take that string very slowly, often with repeated pulls, to make absolutely sure the knot won't snap or fall in.

    I haven't yet tried the ES5P, but from memory the old ES5 did pull very quick and hard (in those days I never used any high tensions, so I never had a problem); DinkALot tells my the ES5P is much the same.
    Glad to hear that the Wise has three speed settings as I do plan to upgrade to that on my Eagnas Combo 810. If a $495 USD aftermarket tension head like the Wise can safely pull starting knots because of speed control, then you would naturally think that a state of the art stringing machine would have that capability too.

    When money is no object as it seems to be with the high end stringing machines like the ES5P, I have always believed that it is a "cop out" for Yonex to say, "Oh, this is not the machine's fault. It's just so powerful that it is a small thing you just have to work around." For that kind of money, there should be no work arounds required, especially when a much lower cost device like the Wise 2086 proves that the right controls can make pulling a high tension starting knot reasonably safe to do.

  8. #25
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    I think it's fair to say that pretty much any top-end machine, apart from the Victor C-Series, has to compromise when it comes to badminton. From experience, the Yonex ES5, Babolat Sensor/Star V et al are by default set up for tennis, and have to be modified to accomodate badminton (longer billiards, shoulder support over-riders etc). A tennis string can, compared to a badminton string, take staggering abuse, so it would be OK for the motors to pull in under two seconds, and the makers have aimed to increase productivity.

    I agree that adding multiple speeds to the motor would cost next-to-nothing and would make a huge difference, especially when a <400 WISE add-on can manage it...

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    I think it's fair to say that pretty much any top-end machine, apart from the Victor C-Series, has to compromise when it comes to badminton. From experience, the Yonex ES5, Babolat Sensor/Star V et al are by default set up for tennis, and have to be modified to accommodate badminton (longer billiards, shoulder support over-riders etc). A tennis string can, compared to a badminton string, take staggering abuse, so it would be OK for the motors to pull in under two seconds, and the makers have aimed to increase productivity.

    I agree that adding multiple speeds to the motor would cost next-to-nothing and would make a huge difference, especially when a <400 WISE add-on can manage it...
    Mark, I did not realize that all those other machines were so tennis oriented. I had thought more consideration was given to making them good all around racket stringing machines. This is the best explanation I have ever heard about why all the non-Victor stringing machines snap badminton strings so easily on direct pulls of a starting knot.

    Since the Victor C-7032 is badminton optimized, Victor really should have given more speed control (I am assuming they didn't) so that pulling on starting knots can have the best possible chance of success. Although, to be fair, I have read from others using the Wise that even when using the lowest speed (#1) on the Wise, pulling on starting knots at high tension is still quite dicey. In this thread http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php/54622-VIDEO-Stringing-A-Racket-(2-Piece-Top-Down)?highlight= DinkAlot laments how many strings still break for him. Of course, DinkAlot tries a lot of 30 pound plus tension crosses. However, Taneepak describes how a 5 loop starting knot and the use of a starting clamp on the starting knot can make a high tension direct pull on a starting knot a minimal risk affair.

    For my own rackets, I am going to use a two string top down approach and will try Taneepak's method.

  10. #27
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    The starting knot should be a) BIG and b) able to slide up and down the main (i.e. it should rely on the grommet for purchase, not the anchor main). And yes, holding the tail with a starting clamp is a good way to stop it falling into the frame.

    I've developed my own starter that's held even Z62 up to 30, and it can be adapted for different string gauges so it's only as big as necessary - pic below shows a one-loop "Appleton Knot" on NBG95 @ 29 - tail lies flush on the frame instead of poking into the bed. I've been toying with doing a step-by-step guide for it, actually...
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Now I know what the A stands for in Mark A, it's Appleton! I guess there are a lot of ways to make a knot big, but to also make it slide easily on the main string and have the tail lie flat on the frame are unique features. I have been searching and bookmarking different starting knots such as the so called "bulky knot" and I would definitely like to have the Appleton knot to try out. If you can find the time to explain and illustrate your starting knot, I bet there are a lot of other stringers interested as well.

  12. #29
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    I'm thinking of purchasing this machine victor c7032.I was also looking at the yonex es5 pro, so would you say tht the victor machine compares or bettered the yonex machine when just stringing badminton rackets?...Also I was wondering if any owners of the victor machine can post a picture with a tennis racket frame mounted......If anyone can suggest anywhere I can either buy machine an get it shipped to uk. Also if there is a specialist place to find used yonex machines...Thanks

  13. #30
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by risingsun View Post
    I'm thinking of purchasing this machine victor c7032.I was also looking at the yonex es5 pro, so would you say tht the victor machine compares or bettered the yonex machine when just stringing badminton rackets?...Also I was wondering if any owners of the victor machine can post a picture with a tennis racket frame mounted......If anyone can suggest anywhere I can either buy machine an get it shipped to uk. Also if there is a specialist place to find used yonex machines...Thanks
    Of all the top-end machines I've seen that aren't badminton-specific, the Yonex makes the fewest compromises when it comes to badminton. If you get the Victor, you'd be stuck doing badminton, but with the best possible badminton mount and a very clever rising tension head (and I suspect it'll be substantially cheaper than the Yonex as well).

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    Of all the top-end machines I've seen that aren't badminton-specific, the Yonex makes the fewest compromises when it comes to badminton. If you get the Victor, you'd be stuck doing badminton, but with the best possible badminton mount and a very clever rising tension head (and I suspect it'll be substantially cheaper than the Yonex as well).
    Thanks for your reply, can I ask if your a stringer an if you have tried out the victor machine an yonex.For myself I string 95% badminton rackets an I feel like on the star 5 it doesn't give me all I need in terms of mounting hold for the frame.What do you mean exactly by the rising tension head on the victor machine?? Any ideas where I can pick up a good deal for either machines???Thanks

  15. #32
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
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    I have tried the Yonex (and Babolat), but not the Victor, but I have seen the Victor's tension head on other machines. It tilts upwards when the pull begins, so that the string is pulled exactly horizontally, then drops down again after the pull so you can turn the racket 360 degrees. Very nice invention, IMO.

    The Star 5 is definitely one of those machines that treats badminton as an afterthought -the towers are fixed (where they move in and out with the Yonex), and this is never a good sign if they are spaced for tennis.

    If I were you, I'd get the Victor and have another, cheaper machine for tennis and squash - this arrangement will be cheaper than the Yonex machine by itself. I must admit, though, that the Yonex was an outstanding piece of technology.

  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    I have tried the Yonex (and Babolat), but not the Victor, but I have seen the Victor's tension head on other machines. It tilts upwards when the pull begins, so that the string is pulled exactly horizontally, then drops down again after the pull so you can turn the racket 360 degrees. Very nice invention, IMO.The Star 5 is definitely one of those machines that treats badminton as an afterthought -the towers are fixed (where they move in and out with the Yonex), and this is never a good sign if they are spaced for tennis.If I were you, I'd get the Victor and have another, cheaper machine for tennis and squash - this arrangement will be cheaper than the Yonex machine by itself. I must admit, though, that the Yonex was an outstanding piece of technology.
    So what's the outstanding piece of technology on te yonex machine as supposed to the victor?? For me I'm thinking there has to be a reason other than branding to why the yonex machine is that much more pricey?....I've used the yonex machine before and it was very nice. I've seen the victor machine an it looks like a great bit of kit an every says that it's better than the yonex??? I'm just wondering if they are all jut anti yonex people?.....For me this is a tough decision as I just wanna get a machine that is best for me. Without having to buy another one a year or two down the line.

  17. #34
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    the Yonex is really designed for beefiness in mind. you can probably drop it from the top of the house and then it will just turn on an keep going.

    it is slightly over-engineered in some way but it is that way because it is designed for professionals in mind, professionals who cannot afford to be held down by machine issues like malfunction or breakage.

    all the material used is very very solid. heavy and stiff material. i have used it a couple of times and i swear it can probably served as a chair if needed.

    the starting (drive?) and control (servo?) mechanism are redundant, if one of them fails, the backup system will kick in.

    for most of us, this is not critical, but for someone who is stringing for a big tournament with 40+ rackets lined up each day and their job depends on it, it is worth every penny.

    and that explains why it is offered at a higher premium than other machines.

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