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  1. #1
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    Default Why So Many Head-Heavy Rackets and So Few Head-Light Ones???

    It seems that almost everyone in the world of badminton (falsely) believes that head-heavy rackets equate to more power, and head-light rackets equate to less power/more touch. This is why so many players are only looking for head-heavy rackets. I found out long ago that for my specific swing, I need a head-light racket to produce the most power. I can produce far more power with a HL racket than I can with a HH one. The problem is that there are so many people blindly looking for HH rackets, that the big companies make very few HL rackets. It's very frustrating. I wish there were more people in this industry who would educate lower level players to properly analyze the right spec of racket for their swing. Maybe then, there would be a lot more people looking for HL rackets. Too many people think that they're just for girls.

    I know there are a lot of people who will say that Yonex and Victor have entire lines of HL rackets. But they don't. The rackets they claim are HL, are infact just balanced.

    Is there anyone else who is frustrated trying to find truly head-light rackets?

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    I agree! There isn't much difference if one plays properly. Just look at the pros. Doesn't matter which racket head light or head heavy. Result of smashing speed is the same.

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    I'm a extreme head light racket user for the most part and you are correct, that suits my game and gives me plenty of power to line up with my swing speed. I also agree that some 'head light' rackets are labelled incorrectly when they are infact balanced or even slightly head heavy in some instances.

    There is a place for head light rackets in badminton and not restricted to beginners or casual players.

    Kindest regards,

    -Ajay-

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Imho your choice of racket balance is dictated by not only your discipline and style of play but also your swing speed and which type of shuttle.
    Last edited by visor; 02-18-2015 at 02:56 PM.

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    Mmm correct me if I'm wrong.. but with a head light.. It actually requires more skills and technique to use. Head heavy is if you get the momentum going then the racket does the rest. But head light if you misuse your swing or power... you end up with nothing...

    But anyway.. that's just a thought

    But you know. The singles pro uses head heavy therefore everyone likes head heavy.

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    Bit of speculation. Basic physics suggests that having more weight between the end point and the moment results in more force. This makes it easier to generate powerful hits.

    I don't think there's much difference between head heavy and head light in terms of touch. I think that HL are much easier to move into position faster; head heavy tend to be more sluggish.

    HH are probably preferable for singles players because it's not often as fast paced as doubles (less driver rallies, more defensive shots). HL makes more sense for doubles.

    Personally, my swing is better with a HH racket, but I can appreciate your frustration. Do Li Ning or Victor not offer more HL rackets? I think Yonex seem to be going a bit crazy on head heavy (Z-Slash, Z-Speed, Z-Force, NR900).

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    Regular Member ant01's Avatar
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    Head light sucked for me at the net, too easy to hit it long.

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    Also the Yonex Nanoray range is meant to depict 'head light' series, yet Z-Speed and NR900 are certainly NOT head light. This is very confusing and frustrating...lol.

    Kindest regards,

    -Ajay-

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    Regular Member ucantseeme's Avatar
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    IMO you are all wrong just by judging a racket as headlight, even and heavy just by balance point. I judge rackets by swing weight which get more in touch than any relation of headweight/overall weight.
    I agree that some Nanorays are not right labelled but you find really headlight rackets in the Nanoray line. You also find headlight racket when you try to choose a Victor or Lining. The problem is that many people want that what the pros use and any lower number sounds like crap.
    So what is wrong to choose a 4U or even 5U racket to get the headlight feeling and a lower head weight to fit your swing speed?
    You should also count in that many pros use damn high tensions. Headlight/Racket with low headweight are not as sturdy/more fragile as headheavy/high headweight rackets.
    Pros have alot stength, superb technique and fast hands, they can handle racket with more headweight better than an average player without any slow down.
    You should also take a look at badminton history and racket development. Today's 4 U head heavy banger are just a hoax, comparing them to a 110g headlight racket, which also has a 44g+ swingweight.
    Last edited by ucantseeme; 02-18-2015 at 05:57 PM.

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    Regular Member leongwaipak's Avatar
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    Don't forget shaft tension and strength has changed significantly over the years.

    I think Carlton racquets are very head light but very fragile as a result.

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    The head light or mid-light is ok to find, for me I would rather see more flexible rackets. I think the pro's are trained enough to handle HH+stiff flex easily....my arms simply can not do that, or not for a longer period at least. I also agree that to use HL, you need to have more skills to play effectively on technical base. With HH - high power rackets, you can use your smashing stamina to score during low to intermediate levels.

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    Badminton players need education is how to choose their own racket, rather than to criticize the head remake of good or bad, a lot of changes in the racket, or if you prefer to smash in the backcourt often, but also a low-level player, you can take 5U (or6U) head heavy racket, if you like to control, if you are technical and strength enough, you can take a 3U or 4U, if you like to control or defense, you can choose belong the kind of control or defense racket, but do not push too much yourself to take exceed extent, or do not belong to their own style of racket.

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    Well said. Too many "couch critics" hiding behind their phones or computers, some of whom you can't see, thinking their opinions should be applied to the larger badminton population... well, to each his own style, and to each his own racket!


    Quote Originally Posted by chienming View Post
    Badminton players need education is how to choose their own racket, rather than to criticize the head remake of good or bad, a lot of changes in the racket, or if you prefer to smash in the backcourt often, but also a low-level player, you can take 5U (or6U) head heavy racket, if you like to control, if you are technical and strength enough, you can take a 3U or 4U, if you like to control or defense, you can choose belong the kind of control or defense racket, but do not push too much yourself to take exceed extent, or do not belong to their own style of racket.

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