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  1. #1
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Default Performance Coach/Chief Coach/Coaching Director

    In recent years I've noticed these terms been used frequently. Morten Frost for eg.has been Performance Coach or Coaching Director for Denmark or South Africa before. Chief Coach I think is used more for China, Japan or Korea eg.Li Yong Bo or Park Joo Bong.

    Many people in this forum seem to think that coaches work best in a vacuum even in badminton associations, I am sure countries like England, Denmark etc. would have hierachial systems like director, chief etc (perhaps some flat and lineal ones too.)

    Can someone fill us in on things like :

    1) What is the job description of a Performance Coach/Director
    2) What is the scope of work?
    3) How does it relate to other coaches?

    Obviously all the above will be designed on a case by case basis, anyone can give some idea?
    Last edited by Bbn; 04-30-2011 at 08:32 AM.

  2. #2
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...r-in-Badminton

    Ah,here's one about Malaysia for a start, and it is from a post from a member of the Malaysian 1976 Thomas Cup team.

    Funny though I dont see any politicians etc. in the CTC.

    What's it like say in England, France, Holland, Germany or Denmark etc?

  3. #3
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    http://www.thesportingedge.co.uk/

    Looks like from googling this Sports Performance Coaching is a body of knowledge by itself

    and lends itself to consultancy services, amongst other things.

    Hope some of you can share your experiences.

  4. #4
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Sth from Scotland too.

    Just google-high performance coach badminton

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    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    After googling several hours this is the best result :

    http://www.leinsterbadminton.com/Hom...S/Default.aspx

  10. #10
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    Since there is no input from people with knowledge in this area and I still cant see the wood for the trees I would summarise

    this concept of High Performance and its implementation as (correct me if I'wrong as I'm only guessing):

    1) High Performance is something targeted for elite players eg.International Players and is based on an Annual Plan
    to ensure they keep IMPROVING,subject to annual review.
    2) To be a High Performance coach, a coach has to reach Level 3 cert.
    3) A High Performance Implementor acts as a mentor to other coaches.
    4) To be able to monitor and implement change the HP coach will have to be an experienced senior coach and be able to gather feedback and
    data from his charges to analyse and OPTIMISE to gain maximum benefit from each coach's work to benefit the whole team or unit. The main Management task in HP is the task of COORDINATING the work of multiple coaches in a BIG organisation to ensure resources are OPTIMISED and shared wisely.
    5) High Performance coaching and implementation is a MANAGEMENT task carried out by a Technical Specialist in his own field.
    6) High Performance is mainly about Team Building and motivation/psychology but also includes mentoring and DEVELOPING and OPTIMISING
    the technical work of coaches.
    7) High Performance in badminton is a concept borrowed from Production Management and borrows key principles like Continuous
    Improvement,Scientific Management,Industrial Psychology,Management Philosophy and especially VALUE ENGINEERING etc. it is merely applying such concepts to sports applied to Sports.It marries coaching with Sports Science and Production/Operations/Quality management.

    That is what I can gather from all the info from the web and based on its relation to practice in other industries.i would not be surprised if Park Joo Bong
    Last edited by Bbn; 05-01-2011 at 08:00 PM.

  11. #11
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    is the main practitioner of this concept, accounting for the rise of Japan and Korea as a major force in badminton (as well as Table tennis and football). Many of the concepts were developed in the West but borrowed and improved and innovated on to produce remarkable results.

    This will help to provide an insight as to why this concept of High Performance is being adopted in many Sports and in particular may reveal the rationale behind Malaysian badminton to implement it,where it is still in its infancy and development stage.One of the main drawbacks in Msia is the lack of qualified people to develop and implement it, otherwise it would be a good opportunity to build it up, develop a brand and able to offer it as a form of specialised service to the rest of the world, after all Msia is still a force, for the time being, in badminton.

    Like all things new,as with others in the past, it takes time to sink in.

    More feedback from REAL practitioners is welcome as there is little available about this area of badminton to the layman on the web.

  12. #12
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    After reading inputs from so many coaches and surfing web-sites and the threads on coaching centres, high performance,posts etc. I think i would like to make a wild guess why in particular, Malaysian Badminton is falling behind China and probably some other countries like Korea and Japan.

    1) Malaysian boys in particular fare very well in boy's international tournaments but fall behind in the senior ranks, whilst China is probably the opposite.
    2) This, I guess is because Malaysian boys are talent based and brought up more on talent in the form of racquet skills and BASIC badminton physical requirements.China is however different, boys in the first few years have not even held a racquet whilst they are under going training as ATHLETES to determine which sports suit them. when they meet in tournaments as boys, Malaysians are very good ball players, whilst Chinese
    lack years behind in the ART of badminton.That is of course assuming that in boys tournaments, the level of physical demands are not so high
    therefore putting ART and SKILLS at an advantage.
    3) Then the boys grow up to be men. The boys in Msia spend many hours studying to build up an alternative career. The boys in China have no choice but to forsake everything as they have no choice (changing now because of economy).The boys in Malaysia spend less time on physical development whilst the boys in China continue to train in the gym etc. to prepare for senior level.
    4) When they compete at adult level, Malaysians may be lacking in physical aspects such as strength,fitness etc.because in their boyhood, they may have been great ball players but they may not have been ATHLETES like Chinese counterparts.China players however are supreme athletes and after they have been selected as potentials, start to build up their playing skills and catch up and have the support of a great infrastructure.
    5) This validates the argument that Malaysian boys HAVE TALENT but do not work or train hard enough after becoming adults,and have to be pushed like in a boot camp.Question is whether they have the time , whether they can cope or whether its too late.People like Foo Kok Keong or Lee Chong Wei or Eddy Choong may be EXCEPTIONS in that they started young already in the fitness mode and probably are as good as marathon runners,it may not work with the majority of players.
    6) Because of the constraints there may be a 3rd choice by adopting the methods used in Japan or Europe instead of relying on China or traditional made in Malaysia styles, probably emphasizing on Quality rather than Quantity in training and also tailoring it to suit each player type. This is clear enough when we see the achievements of Europeans or Japanese.
    7) How to distinguish Quality from Quantity? I think that's where Science and Technology comes in, and coaches have to learn sports science
    to identify the optimum training menu for each player and monitor feedback to adjust by increasing or decreasing shortfalls.If coaches cant do this I think that's where a senior coach together with the Sports Institute have to send them back to school.The onus will always be on the player also to identify his own shortfalls and work with his coach (assuming the coach is competent) to improve.

    The above of course make a lot of assumptions based on the info available. It may be mere perception but at least it is based on a lot of feedback and investigation and at least builds on facts to lead to some conclusions.It does not seek to incriminate or blame anyone ,it is merely trying to see the big picture.Different assumptions will of course lead to different conclusions.Hope this helps and may be able to throw some light on the problem.And above all it is only my opinion, not that of an EXPERT (whatever expert means).
    Last edited by Bbn; 05-04-2011 at 12:05 AM.

  13. #13
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    BBN, u can send that entire post to Bam secretary or send to BAM via email.
    It might be helpful though.

  14. #14
    Regular Member Bbn's Avatar
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    I dont think so, I believe the BAM will laugh (ROFL) because they probably are a few steps ahead already!
    Last edited by Bbn; 05-04-2011 at 03:01 AM.

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