User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 35 to 44 of 44
  1. #35
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Markham, Ont, Canada
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Have anyone using the BG Pro70 for playing plastic birdies? I mostly play with plastic birdies with all my friends, I string all my rackets with BG Pro70 in Acs 10 and Apacs Pro Furious 2000, all of them with 28lb tension, and I feel great either playing with plastic and feather, but one thing that I could notics while I change to use Pro70 from BG66, my smash power as not as powerful and faster then before, and I am sure I apply almost the same power to smash the birdies. But the control is easier and the string last very long and don't feel the tension is drop.
    If you are playing Plastic then you better try on Pro70 and let me know what you think!!
    Ben

  2. #36
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    340
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    so what does power do increase shuttle speed? and repulsion increase shuttle speed too? or power = distance clear and repulsion is speed of the shuttle?

  3. #37
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    SW UK
    Posts
    930
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loben View Post
    I string all my rackets with BG Pro70 in Acs 10 and Apacs Pro Furious 2000, all of them with 28lb tension,
    Why would you do that to yourself? That's a really high tension for playing on plastics.

  4. #38
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    perth, AUS
    Posts
    110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    the basic rule i go by with strings is - ignore the marketing hype about power, repulsion, control, etc.

    think of your string bed as a trampoline. lower tension lets the shuttle bounce more. more bounce makes it harder to control. slower racket swing speeds uses this bounce and makes your shots faster so you get more power. this is how you get effortless clears and really high lifts from minimal racket swing.

    if you have really good form and faster swing speeds especially on smashes, the trampoline bounce absorbs the power that should have been transferred to the shuttle so you need to increase the tension to reduce the absorption for a more efficient transfer of force. basically at higher tensions, you rely on your swing speed to generate power. similarly, at higher tensions with less bounce you have better control of the shuttle.

    the downside of higher tension is with less bounce and absorption of force, theres more vibration transferred from the hit to your racket and then to your arm which can hurt or lead to injuries. this is why us mortals shouldn't play with the same tensions as the pros since they both have much better swing speeds and are in a better physical shape from all the training.

    this bounce effect applies to racket flexibility too. if you have faster swing speeds, you have a more efficient way of transferring that force with a stiff racket. with flexible rackets, you rely on the whipping action to generate that faster swing speed. thats not to say professionals should only use stiff rackets, it depends how they play as well since they can make use of the whipping action of flex rackets and higher tensions to get power.

    personally, i think choosing a string brand or model suited for you comes down to personal preferences to all the other different components of the actual string thats largely ignored like coating, texture, flexibility, and material used which can all have different effects depending on the size or gauge of the string.

    bottom line, understand the physics of choosing the right tension suited for you, find a good string you prefer and stick with it then just practice and enjoy the game.

  5. #39
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    12,764
    Mentioned
    217 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quagmire View Post
    the basic rule i go by with strings is - ignore the marketing hype about power, repulsion, control, etc.

    think of your string bed as a trampoline. lower tension lets the shuttle bounce more. more bounce makes it harder to control. slower racket swing speeds uses this bounce and makes your shots faster so you get more power. this is how you get effortless clears and really high lifts from minimal racket swing.

    if you have really good form and faster swing speeds especially on smashes, the trampoline bounce absorbs the power that should have been transferred to the shuttle so you need to increase the tension to reduce the absorption for a more efficient transfer of force. basically at higher tensions, you rely on your swing speed to generate power. similarly, at higher tensions with less bounce you have better control of the shuttle.

    the downside of higher tension is with less bounce and absorption of force, theres more vibration transferred from the hit to your racket and then to your arm which can hurt or lead to injuries. this is why us mortals shouldn't play with the same tensions as the pros since they both have much better swing speeds and are in a better physical shape from all the training.

    this bounce effect applies to racket flexibility too. if you have faster swing speeds, you have a more efficient way of transferring that force with a stiff racket. with flexible rackets, you rely on the whipping action to generate that faster swing speed. thats not to say professionals should only use stiff rackets, it depends how they play as well since they can make use of the whipping action of flex rackets and higher tensions to get power.

    personally, i think choosing a string brand or model suited for you comes down to personal preferences to all the other different components of the actual string thats largely ignored like coating, texture, flexibility, and material used which can all have different effects depending on the size or gauge of the string.

    bottom line, understand the physics of choosing the right tension suited for you, find a good string you prefer and stick with it then just practice and enjoy the game.
    Good summary.
    One more important thing: sweetspot is smaller with higher tension, but is more potent if you can use it effectively.

  6. #40
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    12,764
    Mentioned
    217 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    @Charlie-SWUK
    Remember, look at the dates...

  7. #41
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    perth, AUS
    Posts
    110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    oh wow an old thread again hahaha

  8. #42
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    3,168
    Mentioned
    55 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Good summary.
    One more important thing: sweetspot is smaller with higher tension, but is more potent if you can use it effectively.
    I don't know if potent is the right word here. The thing is that you feel like some shots are easier to play (for me, overhead clears/drives always feel a little easier with a fresh, hard string), but that might be because you can play with shorter motions since the shuttle won't stay on the racket face as long. It's also very important to distinguish between smashes feeling and actually objectively being faster. For me, sometimes a smash doesn't feel as powerful with a softer racket/string, but will easily penetrate the opponents' defense, while harder string/rackets can make the smash feel more powerful when it's actually a bit slower.
    Anyhow. I agree with quagmire's long post, got most of it right and shouldn't mislead anyone into thinking you need a hard string to smash hard.
    Btw, the hardest smashers in my team (and thus, club) use 11kg and 12kg respectively on their Arc7. So maybe going head heavier and harder isn't always the best choice when seeking power

  9. #43
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    SW UK
    Posts
    930
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    @Charlie-SWUK
    Remember, look at the dates...
    Blame John! I didn't necro the thread, I just got misled.

  10. #44
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    perth, AUS
    Posts
    110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Good summary.
    One more important thing: sweetspot is smaller with higher tension, but is more potent if you can use it effectively.
    ah yes, forgot about this entirely, you are spot on

    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    It's also very important to distinguish between smashes feeling and actually objectively being faster. For me, sometimes a smash doesn't feel as powerful with a softer racket/string, but will easily penetrate the opponents' defense, while harder string/rackets can make the smash feel more powerful when it's actually a bit slower.
    Anyhow. I agree with quagmire's long post, got most of it right and shouldn't mislead anyone into thinking you need a hard string to smash hard.
    Btw, the hardest smashers in my team (and thus, club) use 11kg and 12kg respectively on their Arc7. So maybe going head heavier and harder isn't always the best choice when seeking power
    j4ackie, i think theres too many factors involved when determining what makes a smash feel faster. your timing or the sound the hit makes or even how your opponents perceived your smash.

    in the situation described, your smash with lower tension didn't feel faster for you because the trampoline effect absorbed most of the vibration that should've been sent to your arm. you made use of the bounce from that tension so you got a faster smash. when you switched to higher tension, you felt this feedback more so it felt stronger for you but since you're using less bounce it will be slower if your strokes are exactly the same.

    if you look at the pros tensions and strings, the hardest smashers don't all have the highest tensions. they all just string on a higher range which is about 29lbs to 34lbs with a few outliers. normal people like us simply operate on a lower range which is commonly around 22lbs to 27lbs also with some outliers. you can have your hardest smashers anywhere on their respective tension range depending on how they use it along with their racket and swing.

    as for the topic title itself, seeing as the pros use the full spectrum of string gauge, power is not dependent on it. if it was, everyone will be gravitating towards that gauge.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Similar Threads

  1. Thick Grip Vs. Thin
    By huchmo in forum Grip
    Replies: 54
    : 12-30-2015, 02:49 AM
  2. Replies: 62
    : 12-06-2012, 05:14 PM
  3. Thick strings and high tension stringing
    By Blitzzards in forum Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools
    Replies: 34
    : 01-22-2011, 09:21 PM
  4. Do u like ur grip thick or thin?
    By rapidfire in forum Grip
    Replies: 3
    : 04-18-2010, 04:46 AM
  5. Thick Gauge Strings
    By staiger in forum Badminton String
    Replies: 4
    : 02-22-2010, 06:27 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •