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    Default Jump Smash -Block Jump

    Hi guys,

    I would like to ask what is involve in a block jump and the steps/footwork associate with it ? I had a look on some videos on youtube and the block jump seems to be the hardest type of jump smash to hit (and most athletic shot) . For those of you who mastered this shot , could you share any experience and tips , and if this shot is only for the most advanced players , and how demanding is it on the tendons and ligaments ?

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    May I clarify, if you are talking about this type of jump smash demonstrated by Lee Chong Wei? (Referring to the second smash played, not the one from round the head)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQH6QKE9KwE

    If so, then this video gives an excellent demonstration of one way in which you could perform the block jump/jump out footwork to play the shot, as performed by the master.

    Cheers

    Matt

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    Thanks Matt , yes thats the one . The distance he travelled backward while jumping is unbelievable. I am confuse because for block jump you would land with your non-racket foot in front

    and thus no body rotation and it would not be as offensive as a scissor jump ..am I correct ?

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    Staiger-You can only make the best use of situations provided by your opponent. Many a times, he does not want to allow you to play the best shots.

    When the opponent plays an attacking clear to your fore hand rear corner, you may not have enough time for scissor jump\body rotation. Had LCW not made that offensive block jump & smash, the only other option would have been step out and a defensive shot. Also to add, if it was a high lift, he would have used more offesive options (jump smash\scissor jump etc)

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    staiger: in theory, you are correct that a block jump smash would be less powerful than performing a scissor kick/jump or whatever you want to call it, because, as you have stated, there is little to no body rotation employed. This footwork is normally used by a LOT of players in the forehand rear corner (either this, or, as nprince stated, the step out). Few professionals use the scissor jump footwork from their rear forehand corner. If they have time, they will jump smash, rather than scissor kick. There are some exceptions of course. It should be noted, that although the lower body hasn't rotated, often the shoulder and core will rotate a bit as part of the hit, so it is not completely without body rotation, its just not as obvious.

    The benefit of a jump out, as nprince has said, is that it allows you to take a shuttle that is a little quicker, and allows for contact behind or in line with the body. Thus, the professionals, like LCW, do not have to get behind the shuttle to play a powerful smash - the key is to intercept it early. Remember, at a pro level, power doesn't mean much. everyone has power, everyone has awesome defense - speed is the most important thing. In contrast, almost all professionals use some sort of scissor kick from the backhand rear corner, especially when playing an offensive shot.

    The drawbacks of a jump out, is that it provides a more difficult recovery afterwards (less likely that the weight transfer is going back to your base), but at the same time, your non racket foot is probably closer to your base anyway, and so you have slightly less distance to cover. A scissor kick is probably a good option if you want to smash and rush the net afterwards, because of the forwards body weigh transfer you get.

    So, in summary: is the block jump more or less offensive? In terms of power, it is less powerful than a scissor kick, however, it is much quicker to execute. Thus, I would say it is no less offensive, and perhaps even more so - not from a power point of view, but in terms of pressurising an opponents defense, cutting off the shuttle early is extremely important! Tough call though...

    One day, hopefully my block jump smash will look kind of like LCW but until then, it looks, by comparison, very very average!

    To answer some of your other questions about tendons and ligaments: it will put strain on your body, but this is only dangerous if you learn to jump without learning to land safely. Start slow, and build up the muscle gradually. This will help those muscles that should stabilise your landing to develop properly, allowing you to be safe.
    Last edited by MSeeley; 06-22-2011 at 04:14 AM.

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    Why is it called a block jump?

    Anyway, this sort of shot is for speed to catch the opponent out. You can reach low flying shuttles quickly before having gone too far past your body. To be really effective and aid your recovery, it should be steep.

    Because the footwork placement is different from a scissor kick overhead, I would not recommend playing that smash shot at the back tramlines.

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    cheung: I would agree about not playing smashes from too far back - your recovery will be difficult and the power will be reduced. I most often see block jumps used in doubles with stick smashes and intercepts (i.e. in the midcourt) rather than full power smashes from the rearcourt. I can't give a good explanation as to why its called a block jump, but I am under the understanding its also called a jump out and a china jump depending on where you see it/learn it.

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    Yes if you search for "china jump" you will find more info ...

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    I use the phrase "jump out" for the overall footwork pattern (e.g. split, chasse, block jump). I use "block jump" only for the jump itself. It's useful to have different words for different things.

    "China jump" seems to be the terminology in Denmark (presumably because this type of footwork originated in China).

    Why is it called a block jump? My guess: it's an attempt to intercept or "block" your opponent's flatter shots before they reach the back. You "put yourself in the way" of the shuttle's path, cutting it off (blocking it).

    Note that a block jump can also be used in the backhand corner (leading with the non-racket foot). The defining property of a block jump is that you land in the same basic orientation as you take off. They can be used sideways too, or even forwards -- although the name "block jump" sits less comfortably if you're jumping forwards.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-22-2011 at 08:22 AM.

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    ^^^^ But if you perform a block jump on the back-hand rear court ,would you be so far out off court that it would be hard to recover the next shot ? a scissor jump therefore more appropriate ?

    Gollum, how demanding is the block jump since you are able to perform this shot ? Is it worth the time to learn the shot or is it only for county players - Pros.

    I am asking because I am getting bored with just standing smash ,and scissor jump smash and need something to make the game more interesting again. I asked my coach about the technique for this shot and he said he have no idea

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    There was a pretty good video on this in the past but it's now part of the BestOnCourt paid videos I think. It's not necessarily that much harder to recover, just have to land correctly (pro-actively if you will)

    I still regret not saving those vids when they were on YouTube. I had planned to but there were so many you'd really have to take the time for it so you don't do everything twice and next thing you know BestOnCourt was launched ...

    I see some on this page: http://www.bestoncourt.com/ContentId...?MenuItemId=22
    Just browse through the footwork vids on various levels, there are a couple of china jump vids.
    Last edited by demolidor; 06-22-2011 at 05:48 PM.

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    staiger, it is unusual to perform a china jump in the backhand rear corner - a scissor kick makes more sense as you are already in a good position to do so - however a china jump to intercept a shuttle in the midcourt on the backhand side - that is a great skill to practice. Remember, that the block jump performed in the backhand rear corner, is performed with the racket foot forwards e.g. a right handed player, will have their left foot back, and will jump off this left foot, and land with this left foot furthest from the net (the opposite foot is behind on the forehand side). Recovery is hence tricky - thats why it is more useful for quick intercepts and stick smashes, rather than full power smashes.

    I personally use the block jump a LOT in singles from the rearcourt in my deep forehand corner, where I feel it is extremely useful, especially seeing as from this position you can smash, punch clear, fast drop, slice etc. However, in doubles, it tends to be more of a "midcourt interception" shot, played on both sides. Why? Because in the rearcourt, I really want as much power as possible for my smashes, so I use a scissor kick instead.

    I would say it is not "advanced", but it is quite "athletic" - it requires quite a lot of effort compared, for example, to a standing smash. Its immediate advantage is being able to take the shuttle early and hence keep the tempo of the game high - putting real pressure on your opponents. Playing at a higher pace is something that can be really beneficial if you play league matches, and want to beat a pairing who you feel are quite strong - increase the pace, and see how they cope with it!

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    You need quick feet and rhythm for this footwork to do it well for singles.

    When stepping out initially, use very quick side step. This first step should not be too short otherwise your leap will be very long. When you get used to it, the leap can be made longer. If at anytime, you feel you have difficulty in not quite reaching the shuttle, concentrate on the making the first step larger.

    As you leap, your rhythm slows a bit. Although the shuttle may go past your body, it's very important that it hasn't gone past behind the racquet hand. If it goes past behind the racquet hand, most of your attacking shots are limited.

    Landing is like the LCW video.

    Two ways for recovery to get into the net for righthanders

    1) After a very quick stick, steep smash and you anticipate the opponent to play a defensive shot to the net - one chasse back towards centre position. Left foot nearer the net. Body turned to slightly to right. As the shuttle is returned, small step towards net with left foot and then big right step with racquet ready to kill shuttle at net.
    Caveats: Obviously you have to be in midcourt to 3/4 rear court position when landing, the steps to the net have to be quick. For change of pace of feet, this needs specific training.

    2) If you play a reverse or slice dropshot, I would recommend when recovering to change the feet so that the right foot is forward. You can then take a bigger stride with the left foot to reach net shots as now, you need to be prepared for hair-pin type net returns from your drop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by staiger View Post
    ^^^^ But if you perform a block jump on the back-hand rear court ,would you be so far out off court that it would be hard to recover the next shot ? a scissor jump therefore more appropriate ?
    You wouldn't use a block jump to go fully into the backhand rearcourt. It's more for intercepting towards the rear of the midcourt. Personally I find this one pretty difficult and unnatural.


    Gollum, how demanding is the block jump since you are able to perform this shot ? Is it worth the time to learn the shot or is it only for county players - Pros.
    Well, there's a big difference between my block jumps and LCW's block jumps.

    I would say it's pretty fundamental. It's well within the reach of decent club players. You'll find it's also useful for returning flick serves.

    By the way, I do have a page about block jumps, and I've just released a video on the subject.

    If you're expecting to make some massive leap halfway across the court, then you'll be disappointed. That will need serious training. But if you just want a footwork option that can help you take advantage in the right circumstances, it's not that hard to learn.

    Smaller block jumps are not too tiring. But the technique does seem to reward extra effort.
    Last edited by Gollum; 06-23-2011 at 05:47 AM.

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