13.4.4. Call to BAN the unsportsmanlike act of net blocking

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by beefheart, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    Okay guys, I read a lot of arguements here about whether it is right or wrong and no 100% agreement. Maybe we should consult IBF???

    Jackie, maybe you have not not met those irritating club players who quite often did a tight net shot or a loose one and then immediately put up their racket to block before the opponent hit the shuttlecock or basically you are one of those who always do that and have a good success rate and want to keep the right. Ask yourself why do they do it and you will realised it actually gives a good chance.

    The best way to get out of a tight net shot with a racket blocking at the net situation is to do a cross court net shot. The chance to lift it into the racket face is more than 70% and the % increased the lower you lift the shuttle(most likely into the net)

    To lift a tight net shot, one need to brush it up high and if your opponent racket is already blocking right above the net, it reduce the angle you can brush it up.

    Example if I can still do a decent deep and high "brush up" lift with the shuttlecock at my thigh level but that chance is significantly greatly reduced when a racket is place at the net to block. If I want to avoid the racket face, I will have to brush it higher and it will not end up deep in the court and most likely less than half court or even right at the front for the opponent to actually have time to smash it down.

    Any successful straight net shot return of avoiding that waiting racket block will need the best of the best/lucky to even have a chance at all.

    I do get distracted many times by players who hit a loose net shot and immediately putting their racket up to block as it changed the way I am going to lift, intercept, smash or push it by avoiding his racket, it is not worth breaking or chipping my racket for it at club level.

    Although sometime I do wonder whether I should broke both our rackets on purpose to teach the other person a lesson with a really good swing. That is if he has a really really expensive racket.

    For the person who said you do not need full swing at the front, when it is a terribly loose net shot, it is possible for full swing. You do not need full power to break a racket. Even sometime a normal light clash can cause a racket to break, just need to hit the sweetspot where it is the most fragile.

    For me, if both are really close to the net, a block should only be legal if the opponent has contacted the shuttle and then the blocker block and not putting the racket at the net already blocking before the opponent even attempt the shot. With nowadays technology, one can always use the challenge in this case.

    Please do not tell me that you never get distracted by someone who do a tight netshot or a loose one and immediately held his racket up to block before you even hit the return.
     
    #41 hyun007, Jun 9, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2017
  2. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    Face it - your opponent almost outplayed you by making a perfect netshot. He deserves to win the rally unless your return will be even more amazing. As long as he is not interfering with your shot and keeps the racket on his side of the net - there is no reason in the world to prevent him doing what he wants.

    By the way, if you hit opponent's racket when he attempts blocking a netshot that you played from under the net - you are at fault for obstruction :cool:...
     
    #42 stradrider, Jun 9, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2017
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  3. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    Are you even thinking or reviewing all my comments??? If you do a perfect netshot, why on earth do you need to put a racket at the net to block? You will most probably be waiting for an intercept shot instead. If you have observe when some of the pros used the block shot, it usually happened when they did a bad net shot.

    For your under the net, what is the height you are talking about? I can do it at thigh level for a follow through brush up lift if I want(it is legal) or when a loose netshot for intercept and kill. For sure not at a very low point where it is so obvious that it is impossible to lift and I lift it to hit his racket. That is like asking for someone to punch you.
     
    #43 hyun007, Jun 9, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2017
  4. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    It doesn't really matter, the way you are talking is like there is a wall in front of the net and you don't have anywhere to play :). You know, the racket is only 20 cm wide and unless he breaks the rules your opponent can't even put it too close to the net or else he will be over the net. Let him do his thing, it's not even a good idea to block like that as you said...
     
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  5. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    I think the most problem people have with the net blocking like this is not the shot itself but the annoying satisfied look on the face of the opponent when he manages to pull it off o_O...
     
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  6. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    20cm is a big different in geometry term for lifting a shuttlecock! It can affect how deep and high one can lift a shuttlecock to the baseline. A few cm can be very critical + the height where you hit the shuttlecock. I guess you never get to study this or nobody bother to explain to you.
     
    #46 hyun007, Jun 10, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2017
  7. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    Not really, because I was taught it is an illegal shot since young. A few pros have been penalised for it and a few got away as well.
     
  8. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    We never promised that badminton is an easy game :cool:. In the worst case scenario if he tries to smash your low lift you can revenge by net blocking back like this:rolleyes::


    By the way you don't really need a good lift if he is staying at the net..:)
     
  9. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    No idea what you are talking about.
     
  10. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    Then you've been taught incorrectly. It's illegal to hinder your opponent's shotmaking, it's perfectly legal to put your racket anywhere you want on your side of the net as long as you avoid that. Makes perfect sense, too, ehy shouldnt you.
    It's about as good an argument to say that it limits your shot options and should be banned as saying you shouldnt be allowed to deceive your opponent with a flicked lift and limit him to a straight drop or clear because he is so late to it - as long as you do not a) hinder your opponent's ability to play any shot he wants or b) intentionally distract him by making noises or threatening/irritating movements, everything is fine, legally speaking.
    There is, of course, a certain etiquette, a way in which you should conduct yourself (not screaming into their faces, not going for the face on an easy kill etc), but that is largely not part of the rules, nor should it be. It's unwritten rules, and those who do not respect them are generally unliked or even hated by other players.
    Cant recall any pro (or any player, for that matter) mentioning they hated someone for 'always blocking at the net, it's so unfair and has such a big impact'....no one ever complained about it that I saw or heard of. Even if it were not fair (which I do not think at all) it wouldnt pose much of a problem since it's such a rare occurence.
     
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  11. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    Player staying at the net with his racket above the net is totally out of position, he will not be able to go back fast enough for any kind of lift that is further than the center of the court. Many times I have seen a rally was even won with a good lift...
     
  12. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    Not when it is in Double. Also, it is too risky to lift in such situation. The odd are against the lifter actually.
     
  13. stradrider

    stradrider Regular Member

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    It does not change the fact that he is out of position - than play cross, any "ok" cross will be a win too.
     
  14. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    How is lifting risky...it's literally the safest shot in that situation
     
  15. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    When you are recieving it at a low height close to the net. With a racket head block waiting there, it is risky to lift. GEOMETRY angle like what you said. Most of the videos online are of recieving it at near net level so you do not get to see the disavantage.
     
  16. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    I'm talking from experience, not footage. If you lift decently, the lift cant be intercepted with a legal block.
     
  17. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    I challenge you to find any footage of a pro blocking with his racket up and not moving in doubles.
     
  18. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    That is what I mean, the pros in double tend not to do it but the noobs in double do it alot! If it is legal, then it is not exploited properly.
     
  19. hyun007

    hyun007 Regular Member

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    You are talking as though you have more experience than me. If you are receiving it high enough, yes, you can avoid it. If you recieving it at a lower height and near to the near, it is hard to avoid it. If you still do not understand, I think I will need diagram to show you.
     
  20. j4ckie

    j4ckie Regular Member

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    I'm not assuming anything about your experience, and my geometric imagination is quite adequate for this simple scenario. It's literally almost impossible to legally block a lift that follows a good net shot (not a net cord that barely goes over). At least if the player lifting is semi-competent.
     

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