A set is a game or a match?

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by Zohar, Jun 18, 2018.

  1. Zohar

    Zohar Regular Member

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  2. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    I would also like to have separate terms for a teammatch and a match between two players, or a game and the game of Badminton, but language is defined by what is common usage.

    And in common usage, the term set is used as an informal synonym of game (i.e. one part of a match). Here are a couple of examples I could find:

    Mark Phelan writing for Badminton Europe:
    Viktor Axelsen being quoted about the same:
    Chris Adcock:
    Toby Ng:
    Isabel Herttrich:
    badminton.es:
    Chris Langridge:
    Rajiv Ouseph:
    Although not all quotes are absolutely clear, the context makes the usage of set = game unmistakable in every single case. Can you find even a single quote that would support your interpretation?
     
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  3. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Doubt that this is widespread across the badminton community as a whole unless it is people who are unfamiliar with the sport.

    what's the confusion? In that link, it clearly states a game can be called a set. Perhaps you are getting yourself confused by trying to adapt badminton scoring into tennis definitions.
     
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  4. Zohar

    Zohar Regular Member

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    phihag, thanks for the usual well researched answer. You are not helping (me) though :)

    Cheung, the link is clear; but it confused my friend who thinks that a set is a game because of it :)

    Okay, I'll be more careful when using the term set.
     
  5. event

    event Regular Member

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    Again. No confusion. Your friend is right. A set is a game. You are the first person I've ever heard of who has proposed using set to mean a match. Have you met others?
     
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  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Even BWF translators get it wrong.

     
  7. event

    event Regular Member

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    So presumably the first instance of the word 'game' in that quote refers to the final match. Does the second one mean that it's her third tournament? I used to hear Koreans use the English loanword ge-im to mean 競技大會, or tournament, but that was concerning people speaking Korean, not English. There is no excuse for a BWF subtitle to contain such a blunder.

    Actually, the Korean word 경기 (競技 / gyeonggi) can be used to mean game, match or tournament so one has no choice but to resort to loan words from English. The trouble is that me-chi (from match) is the Korean expression for 'game point', even though multi-game matches consist of il seteu, i seteu, and sam seteu (from 1st, 2nd and 3rd 'set').

    By this, are you implying that you are not satisfied with the BWF term 'team tie'? As a speaker of North American English, I find this one uncomfortable. In North American English, the fifth match in a 'tie' in the knockout round is played in order to break a 2-all 'tie'. I am assuming British English uses exclusively the word 'draw' for situations of equal score, and it has no other meaning...oh wait! :rolleyes:
     
  8. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Whichever way I read it, I feel the translation is not quite grammatically right. For instance, the tense used in the second sentence. I would really need to see the Chinese to work it out properly. 局 - game/set,场 -match, 比赛 - tournament/competition
     
    #8 Cheung, Jun 20, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2018
  9. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    No, actually I wasn't aware of that term! But I'd really like to have one word, and I fear tie or team tie would be even less understood than team match.
     
  10. Zohar

    Zohar Regular Member

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    @event, the word set isn't used much around here, and it's still kind of informal anyway. I mean, only now someone challenged me about it.

    @phihag, why do you care, can't you in German take 10 words and concatenate them together into one single word in the language? :)
     
  11. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

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    Well, as a programmer, I mostly use English ;)

    The only difference between German and English is that in English, there's a hyphen, space, or apostrophe between words, whereas in German, there's a hyphen, a glue character, or simply nothing there. For instance, one translation of team tie is Mannschaftsspiel, with Mannschaft=team and Spiel=match. Alternatives are Mannschaftswettkampf (Wettkampf=competition) or Mannschaftskampf (Kampf=fight).

    But it's not about having any word, but about having a short word. The more I think about, the more I like tie.
     

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