Anti-Deception Training

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by DarkHiatus, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Does anyone have ideas for training/drills that can be done to minimise over-commiting to shots due to anticipating incorrectly?

    It seems training footwork patterns don't help this aspect much - just means I move the wrong way more efficiently before having to turn back :p

    Ideally able to be done alone, but all ideas are worth hearing. The best would be playing with a coach/high level player who is very deceptive/holds shots well, but that comes at a cost!

    So far, I've been advised that footwork shadows with a computer indicating random corners would be useful. I have got an app but it's rather difficult to see on a small mobile screen. Maybe an audio version would be better, but that might move further away from the 'real' scenarios.
     
  2. decoy

    decoy Regular Member

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    I would suggest using an app to randomize the corners with audio so you can listen to it while doing the movements. The alternative would be to have a friend call out or point to corners then you go to them on reaction.

    Realistically you're going to get caught out by deception sometimes. The only way to never get caught by it would be to not react at all until the shuttle is hit, but then you're relying purely on your movement speed to get the shuttle.

    Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
     
  3. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    It will only help for deception when your opponent is in the front court, but you can always cover the net. You can still see overhead strokes, but it's a start and ask you need is some light towels or something similar.
     
  4. LenaicM

    LenaicM Regular Member

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    The app "Badminton Footwork Trainer" has audio and even pace adjustments setting.

    May be working on improving reflexes would help to prevent anticipation and sharpen reaction time thus the confidence in one's ability to move after the shuttle is hit and avoid being the victim of a deceptive stroke.

    What about those reflex drills? I like the unpredictable bouncing ball and I think it could be used without any partner by throwing it towards a wall and let it rebound once before trying to catch it. It actually had me wanting to get one for my off-court training :)

     
  5. speCulatius

    speCulatius Regular Member

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    That's something I wanted to suggest, too. Anything that helps you to focus on the shuttle (and react). It might sound silly, but some people (more than you'd think) don't really focus on the shuttle, but on the ceiling/wall behind it.
    Some exercise suggestions that you can vary and extend to your liking, I'll just write some down for half a court, but I'm sure you can think how to extend then to a full court. Your shots and actions are marked red, your partner's green.

    • high serve by the one practicing (let's say it's you), get in central position (half court to begin with), close your eyes
    • your training partner hits a smash
    • open your eyes after you've heard the sound, play a block defense
    • your partner plays a short return
    • high lift (like the high serve) to start over
    Just to get you thinking, one possible extension and variation with both practicing might be
    • high serve (later high lift), close your eyes
    • smash or clear
    • open your eyes after you hear the sound, when it's a clear, you play another clear and close your eyes again (so you start over), after a smash, you play a block defense
    • after the block defense, your partner plays the high lift and closes the eyes
    • then you can choose between smash or clear
    • ...
    You can try to replace the clear by a drop for an easier version, but it really depends on the environment if you can hear that.
     
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  6. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    Are people really fast enough to return a shuttle afte waiting for the sound? That is surprising to me! I suppose on the half court it should be within racquet reach. Should the feeder be going easy or is it possible at full speed half court?

    My main trouble is that I often false start in the wrong direction, thereby doubling the work I have to do to get to a shuttle. If I guess correctly, then I often even get there "too fast" and end up overshooting the shuttle and cramp my stroke.

    A drill where I need to wait for the shuttle, or for a direction to be called would be best. I'll try the app for footwork.

    One of the drills I'm thinking of is the classic king and worker, but with a way to disguise the feed (without having a very skilled player) - the eye closed seems like a way to do it if it isn't too slow. I am assuming it should be possible for a singles player to endlessly retrieve drops and clears all day long (and return them to the back corners), if an opponent doesn't smash. Is this correct, or am I setting my expectations too high?
     
  7. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    I'm lucky enough to have this opportunity, against probably one of the most deceptive players in the country. It's both a humbling and confidence-building experience. :)

    Nevertheless, I don't necessarily think you need a very deceptive opponent (although of course it helps a lot). The fundamental issue is learning suitable movement habits when your opponent is in control. Take the rearcourt as an example. The feeder can stand at the back, and feed a shuttle for you to lift high and deep to their corner. You can give them a restricted range of shot options to start with, and then peel away those limitations until they are hitting any shot.

    So let's say you only have a less deceptive player, like me. I can still hit some good slices, stop-drops, and so on. The difference is that I'm not going to be as consistent, so more of them are going out (so what? Just do more repetitions). And I'm not going to smash as hard. And I'm not going to have the more ridiculous shots, like "backwards" slices, or a straight clip-slice hit from round-the-head that swerves and dies halfway before the service line, or a perfectly disguised leaning cross-reverse slice that suddenly becomes a straight punch clear.

    But none of those things are necessary for your practice. All you need is a feeder who can hit four corners from an advantageous position, with a degree of deception, even if they're not consistent. Even the shots that go out can be useful practice.

    Now let's say your feeder can't hit a slice at all, or has a weak smash. You can give yourself less reaction time by lifting shorter. By reducing your reaction time, the opponent has less work to do. They can more easily get you into a position where you are required to wait and see where the shuttle is going, and learn how to time your split, and learn how to move under pressure. This might need some cooperation on the part of the feeder. For example, if they have a good smash but no slices, you can still lift short but ask them not to smash too hard.

    The same idea can be applied at the net. Again, I'm lucky that I can serve against someone with an ungodly range of deceptive shots, all taken early and with pinpoint accuracy. But you don't need that. As already mentioned, you can cover the net with bin bags. Or you can let them stand really close, so you have less time.

    When wheelchair badminton players are in a good position, they travel in a circle rather than forwards/backwards. Then they listen for the sound of the opponent hitting, as their turning time will be different depending on a clear or drop. While they play on a reduced court, it's still pretty damn impressive. I had trouble just holding the racket while propelling the chair. ;)
     
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  8. phucle

    phucle Regular Member

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    For me the best antidote to opponent who likes to use deception is just to overwhelm him with basis shots and respond to the shots only after it's played. Deceptive shots most of the time actually will put the user at a disadvantage because the user often tries to screw up my timing by playing the shots later than he could have, thus giving me more time to react to the shot AFTER it's played. I actually love to play against opponents who overly rely on deception since a couple good responses from me will deflate his will and his deceptive shots will get worse, giving me even better chance to finish the rally. Deceptive shots drain mental stamina more than basis shots, so you should not feel intimidated against someone who use them all the time.

    The best deceptive players are those who do not overly rely on deception but use it as one part of his arsenal. He will throw in one here and there but will overwhelm me with basis games all the same. I think that if you find yourself pressed by an opponent's deception, you likely would have been pressured by his basis shots anyhow.

    One of the more deceptive pros in modern badminton I think is Watanabe, but his deception only really works well in games where his basis games are solid. When he or Higashino is overwhelmed, especially against the chinese pairs, his deception seems more like desperation shots that are quickly punished.
     
  9. Borkya

    Borkya Regular Member

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    To train reaction time yourself you can get a "reaction Ball." It's a ball with little nubs all over it, so as you bounce it it will randomly change direction. So if you want to grab it in one bounce, you have to be quick! And it helps you react quicker. It's a cheap little ball and something you can do at home, by yourself, which is always easier than trying to find a partner who can consistently feed you shuttles.

    For actual game play deception my coach always says "watch the shuttle, not the hand" and react only to the shuttle movement, not what you *think* the shuttle will do based on hand/body placement. which is hard for me (I'm a total sucker for deception) but good advice.
     
  10. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

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    When playing we use most of our sense. We see, hearing, & sensing. Few little trick like:
    1. Say it loud that the bird is out. Sometimes we got tricked this way & let the bird fall.
    2. Opponent body or hand moving to the left but throw the bird on the right. Our eye follow opponent body movement & unconciously follow it.

    Then for them with a very good wrist is kinda more difficult to intercept. They can play the bird in a very little time gap which maked our preparation shorter.

    I think there is 3 thing that is needed to counter deception play
    1. Focus ourself on the bird instead of opponent hand or body language & self confident to determine to hit or let go.
    2. Good foot work. Better footwork would makes you able to move faster & steadier.
    3. Positioning. Moving in neutral zone that not to far from front or back would make your self easy to anticipate deception shot.
     
  11. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Not the first time that I'm sharing this simple but highly effective drill:


    It teaches you quickly to push off when you can actually see the shuttle in the air. And it guarantees some good laughs when you watch one after the other of your mates stagger and tip over time after time.

    And also I remebered this clip with the covered net:


    Haven't done it myself yet, but in theory that should be exactly what you're looking for.
     
  12. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

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    These are some great ideas!

    I will certainly try:
    • randomised footwork app
    • covered net
    • false start throws (feed in front)
    • hidden throws (feed from behind)
    • closed eye drills (someone has just been hit in the eye with a shuttle, so i'll maybe pass on the smashes and limit to drops/clears :p)
    • adjusting positioning - I've noticed the pro players often stop reasonably short of the centre when recovering from the rearcourt (half a step recovery), even if they have played a clear. And when they smash, they sometimes split from where they land after the smash. I'll try adjust my footworks so i'm not always trying to recover to the middle.
    I haven't got a regular training partner who is consistent enough to play 4 corners from the rearcourt yet, but i'll keep trying. Also not sold on the reaction ball - does it help much?

    I almost always false start forwards (then have to move backwards which feels awful), so i'll find the net ones less useful. I'm a bit stronger against deception when the opponent is at the net, but especially fooled by the rearcourt drops/clears. Something about the full body motion just hypnotises me.

    I've been told my individual footworks are actually quite fast when I don't false start, but I do it often enough that my rhythm suffers and i "move too much", so i am relatively confident in getting there quickly, it's just doing it reliably in the right direction every time.
     
  13. s_mair

    s_mair Regular Member

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    Forgot to add a comment on that one. I also have a reaction ball and to me, it is an intersting gimmick that offers some nice workout possibilities. Here are some ideas:




    And believe me, those stuff is far more exhausting that it looks. :D
     
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  14. Borkya

    Borkya Regular Member

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    Yeah, the reaction ball is a LOT tougher than it looks. It's certainly not the be all and end all, and is just one tool that can help you improve. Although the good thing about it is you can do it by yourself in your home, so it's something you can do in non-badminton time. (I would always prioritize the other suggestions when you actually have time on a court. This would just be when you have free time at home.)
     

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