avoid heart attack for older player

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by lim, Jan 27, 2001.

  1. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Don't know about how strong is the correlation with sleep, if so, sleeping pills would be marketed to prevent heart attacks. ;)
     
  2. leongwaipak

    leongwaipak Regular Member

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    True story, we have a member who is in his mid to late sixties. Tall not overweight but he did have a heart attack and heart surgery a few years back. Turns out he had a cholesterol problem and being slim doesn't stop you from having heart issues. (He loved his seafood and chips)
    Anyway he still comes and plays and I'm always very conscious when playing against him in case I give him a heart attack. Usually I just attack his body so he does not have to run too far away and give his heart to much stress.
     
  3. TeddyC

    TeddyC Regular Member

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  4. leongwaipak

    leongwaipak Regular Member

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    I thought aspirin was better than sleeping pills?
     
  5. eddychan

    eddychan Regular Member

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    Thanks, Loh.. that was very useful information

    I take one 500mg asprin after a strenous session.. I am under the impression that it helps to prevent heart attack by diluting the blood so it does not clot suddenly. The asprin also helps to ease the aches, and provides blissful sleep
     
  6. bestindigital

    bestindigital Regular Member

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    I was told several years ago that whiskey does the same thing. That's what I have been doing - two shots of whiskey when I feel tired. :p
     
  7. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    One thing must be pointed out though, if there's any significant family history of heart attack or heart disease (esp at young age), high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, etc., then you should definitely get yourself checked to make sure that you don't carry the same risk factors. Doesn't matter if you're young, healthy, thin, fit, and can play badminton non stop for 3 hours.
     
  8. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    that's esp true. i have a friend who is a triathlete and a pretty good one. can probably out run/bike/swim most badminton players i know. however, she still managed to develop diabetes. aside from the common joke that, "you don't exercise enough," it is also a reminder that being active and athletic only lower the chance but no eliminate it. and we should always have regular health check to detect any early symptoms.

    having said that, i think i need to schedule my own health check.
     
  9. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    No doubt 7 hours of sleep is good for you but I find it hard to believe that someone who does all other right things die because 1 check box was incomplete. 4-5hrs of sleep kills u???? Hard to swallow.

    Well according to the Expert Dr here who affirmed the dear departed did everything else right as what a western Dr would comand, I would have to assume this was his lifestyle:

    1) Exercise a lot
    2) lots of protein Shakes (unfortunately the wrong kind)
    3) vegetable oil
    4) Low fat and low cholesterol diet
    5) probably even practiced carb loading for his training routines

    Active sports persons are already high risk cardio victims. Average life expectancy is lower lest they are on great grandma diets.

    Running for health is the ultimate misinformation. Ask James Fixx. He wrote the book for running endorsed by the medical community and died by it in a very similar fashion to the CEO above

    For those who practice carb loading, look up Brain Maxwell. Co inventor of the world's famous POWERBAR and carb loading practice. Yes very successful marathon runner and very cardiac dead at early 50s.

    They should put on the power bar: we bought this company from a guy who died of heart attack after the sale was done.

    My only view on the subject of cardiac disease is look back on our ancestors diet. They were more likely healthier than us despite infectious disease problem, they had less degenerative desease to deal with.

    Regards and all the best.
     
  10. bestindigital

    bestindigital Regular Member

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    :( I need to sleep more. I get by on 5 to 6 hours of sleep every night. And I am very active.

    Might as well enjoy life and go early than stay inactive and "surviving" till 70 or 80.
     
  11. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    Its sort of a paradox. Heavy Exercise regiment on modern diet increases your need for sleep (I.e. 5 hours won't cut it) but can also lead to difficulty to sleeping which the problem builds up over time.
     
  12. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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  13. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    Grear link Kwun.

    40+ years of bad advice.

    They realise this drink lots of water rubbish and suddenly no one remembers who started the 8 glasses of water a day.

    Just who are these experts preaching us false health advice what did they really study and who should we put in jail.

    Rethink what we and the experts know on health to be true probably came from commercial TV and poster adds.


     
  14. vkokamthankar

    vkokamthankar Regular Member

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    Read this article, it is obvious if any one drinks few liters of water in one go then he/she is likely to suffer. It is also not too fair to criticize the theory of drinking 8 glasses of water in a day. To my knowledge nobody mentioned that drink 8 glasses in one go. But theory says drink 8 glasses in 24 hours.

    Article also fails to advise on how much water one should drink while playing / exercising ? I believe it will depend upon the length and intensity of physical effort and amount of perspiration.

    As far as badminton is concerned, I have not seen anybody consuming more than a bottle (1 liter) of water during a play of say 45 minutes, which I feel, should not harm.

    Or simply follow call from your body, whenever you feel thirsty, dry in mouth consume little amount of water, may be 100-150 ml. at a time and not in liters.
     
  15. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Where did the 8 glasses of water come into this? Is there a reference for 8 glasses of water during exercise?

    For the advice on drinking lots of fluid during endurance events, I think that actually goes back to the American College of Sports Medicine. One prominent member of the committee apparently was linked to the sports drink industry. The industry would naturally promote it's products - after all, logic dictates you should replace fluids as they are lost. It's just that in practice, this produced a harmful effect!
     
  16. |_Footwork_|

    |_Footwork_| Regular Member

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    8 glasses of water is what? 2 Liters?
    Come on, that won't kill you, even if you drink them in 2 minutes.
     
  17. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    Science of nutrition is neither very complicated nor very new. If they could nurse concentration camp survivors in deep starvation without poisoning them with the very food to save them... I doubt water and sports was less of a puzzle to them.

    You hit the nail on the head. Money and capitalism allows one white lie too many to grey the thin red line of health and what not in the name of commercial product pushing. Now we have entire generations across geographical locations who are brainwashed by false truths.

    What's worse are the experts in health are gobbling it up and passing on advert knowledge on health science to unsuspecting sportsmen and average joes.

    Careful whose advise you buy, what your sports nutritionist/trainer thinks he knows might kill ya

    Btw 8 glasses of water ref in kwuns link
     
    #77 jug8man, Feb 16, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2015
  18. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Yes, but 4L within 1-2 hrs can kill, as has been shown in a few cases.

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_intoxication
     
  19. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    I think it's a bit fanciful for badminton players to worry about dying from drinking too much water. ;) In most cases players don't drink enough.

    If you are exercising heavily over a prolonged period, then proper rehydration can help a lot. In most cases this means drinking more water than normal, and eating some food. The food is what tops up your electrolytes -- mainly salt, but also potassium (bananas are a good source).

    Alternatively, you can buy drinks to replace lost electrolytes, or mix your own (e.g. diluted fruit juice + a pinch of salt, which tastes awful). This might be more suitable for a single badminton match, compared to eating. Over a longer period -- say, a long clubnight of 3--4 hours -- you might be better off eating something. Try both and see what works best for you.

    I occasionally go on deep caving trips, which can be 18 hours straight (or 34 hours for certain insane Spanish cavers...). It's difficult to carry much food and you don't feel like eating a full meal anyway. I always carried a packet of rehydration powder (e.g. dioralyte) in my first-aid kit, but I've started drinking one as a matter of course on these trips, as I know from experience that I am guaranteed to be dehydrated by the time we turn around and start the long climb out.

    I wouldn't recommend it as a matter of course for badminton, but it's worth knowing about. We've had several cases where people have been exhausted and confused, and one of these drinks sorts them out in 15 minutes. It's the most useful item in my first-aid kit.
     
    #79 Gollum, Feb 16, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2015
  20. shooting stroke

    shooting stroke Regular Member

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    Unless you are suffering from a kidney failure that requires life long dialysis or has a known medical history of a congestive heart failure and currently on treatment then restricting from taking so many fluids is important. If you are healthy otherwise and physically fit and active, taking anywhere within 2 liter of water a day or more depending on your activity will indeed can maintain your hydration status rather then killing you. Unless if the badminton player has an undiagnosed Cardiovascular/Renal or Electrolyte Imbalance problem, rather then drinking a lot of water after prolonged period of playing aggressively that will kill, it's likely that the scenario of prolonging the state of dehydration from the habit and lack of awareness to rehydrate back quickly that is far even dangerous. It is rarely that an active person dies due to hypovolemic shock secondary to dehydration secondary to extreme perspiration but it does happen if dehydration is allow to prolonged and maintaining the proper hydration does not take place quickly.

    How important it is in understanding the role of fluid in exercise, to a physically active and especially old person, the most common cause of a heart attack if one does occur to a player who has no known medical history before is having an undiagnosed risk factor/s that can lead to a heart attack. Lack or reduce sleep by itself will not cause an heart attack but such lifestyle habit can definitely increase the other Cardiovascular risk factors that in long term will increases the risk of a heart attack. Therefore regardless of what age spectrum you are in and how physically active you might think you are, being constantly aware of one self well being for all possible risk factors that can lead to any potential Cardiovascular problem and immediately taking all the necessary lifestyle changes and clinical treatment, if indicated, are the most optimal approach in avoiding a heart attack.
     

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