Badminton crowd : loud or quiet?

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by kwun, Aug 24, 2005.

?

how should a badminton crowd cheer?

  1. loudly! make lots of noise between and during rallies (eg. INA open)

    5 vote(s)
    38.5%
  2. loudly, make noise only between rallies, stay quiet during rallies.

    5 vote(s)
    38.5%
  3. quiet, hand clapping between rallies. (eg. JPN open)

    3 vote(s)
    23.1%
  4. dead silence all the time.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    I love the atmosphere in Indonesia
    it feels pretty lively and tense (Especially in finals)
    I love how Indonesian supporter shout habisin! habisin! habisin! (habisin means finish him / her / them)

    or when they use (what is it? 2 sticks and you hit those two stick and produce "bam" sound)
    it's like: IN-DO-NE-SIA bambam bambam bam IN-DO-NE-SIA bambam bambam bam

    chia you is.. (kinda hard to explain)
    it is like, saying "lift up your spirit!"
    to encourage them
    to cheer them, something like that
     
    #181 Avenger, Jan 9, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2011
  2. Gicutzu

    Gicutzu Regular Member

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    Is this the same thing that table tennis players yell when they win a point (I've heard badminton players yell it as well, some Japanese ones)? Although that sounds more like "cho"...
     
  3. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    maybe you mean "yosh(a)" ?
    that's japanese expression, it is like saying "yes!" when you win a point
     
  4. Gicutzu

    Gicutzu Regular Member

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    It's definitely more like "cho" or "sho" or something like that. Asian (mostly Chinese) and some European players shout it in table tennis, and some Asian and even some European players shout it in badminton (or something that sounds just like it), when they win a point.
     
  5. Novitano

    Novitano Regular Member

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    As long as its for support, could be as loud as you want. Once you cross into being mean-spirited towards the other team or person (the one you're not supporting), then it becomes rather annoying. But it can serve to motivate you too.

    I recall one situation like that, we managed a 2-1 comeback after losing the first game. The silence of the crowd due to disbelief (I'm guessing we were underdogs), was just beautiful. (;
     
  6. demolidor

    demolidor Regular Member

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    :D Can we rent them for the Japan Open?

    [video=youtube;82rS6SLgrJQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=82rS6SLgrJQ#![/video]
     
  7. SantaSCSI

    SantaSCSI Regular Member

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    It's sometimes hilarious during tournaments. Last time I had to play against someone from the hosting club and the support was HUGE. Parents, brothers, sisters, friends all cheering for my opponent.

    I tend to break the one-sided cheering with a well placed "HUZZAAAHHH" when I score a very nice point ^^. People tend to see the joke in it. A few months ago a few even started to cheer too :p.

    That put aside, I like some good ol' cheering as long as its not friggin towboat-horns or something.
     
  8. tobradex

    tobradex Regular Member

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    Literally translated I would put "add oil". It roughly means put more gas in the tank.
    I.E. go harder, faster, stronger. As others have stated, it's a term meant to encourage someone to keep at it and play hard/fiercely.

    Hope that makes sense. It's kinda difficult to explain through typing.
     
  9. CantSmashThis

    CantSmashThis Regular Member

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    As both a player and an umpire. I would love to play in a loud surrounding. It would push me further when I play with all the (hopefully support and not the pressure from being in an away crowd)

    As an umpire, I definitely love to have a very loud atmosphere. It just makes me enjoy the match that much more.
     
  10. KB@TB Em

    KB@TB Em Regular Member

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    Between rallies as loud as possible^^ But within rallies only if it is long one and scream when players are smashing like your hear it in All England videos ;)
     
  11. Gary Lim

    Gary Lim Regular Member

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    I know this is a 2-year old thread that I'm resurrecting (!!!) but since it came up to the top in the "Today's Post".... just a correction on the term "chia you".

    The explanation given is correct. However, the pronunciation is more accurate as "jia you". I don't think there's a chinese word that's pronounced "chia". Instead of the "ch" sound, it starts with your mouth making a "zt" sound.

    Just thought I'd bring this up cos many non-Chinese speakers learning the language do make this common mistake.
     
  12. opikbidin

    opikbidin Regular Member

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    depends on which "chinese". maube in mandarin yes, but with Hokkian, Hakka and otheres, maybe what the other poster said is right
     
  13. Gary Lim

    Gary Lim Regular Member

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    Agreed. In certain dialects, "jia you" would be literally translated to be pronounced as "chia you", but that would translate in that dialect to "eat oil", which is used more often to describe a car's big appetite for petrol. They wouldn't use "chia you" to describe encouragement. The intonation would be completely different as well.
     
  14. kakinami

    kakinami Regular Member

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    I like the Korean Ta ha min go. In America we say Pink Flamingo!!
     
  15. bmintonskills

    bmintonskills Regular Member

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    I'd go for "loudly, make noise only between rallies, stay quiet during rallies." but at the end of the day you can't really stop people getting excited and making loud cheers! :cool:
     
  16. y11971alex

    y11971alex Regular Member

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    Personally, I hope they will be silent through rallies; during breaks, they can applaud or shout to their hearts' desire. I'm not asking for the type of restrained, stately applause of 1930s Wimbledon, but shouting during the rally, especially random shouting as opposed to rhythmic chanting, is a bit too much for me, even as a member of the audience. I want to be able to hear the ping of the shuttle hitting the stringbed.

    The clip of the 1952 AE demonstrates the ideal for me fairly well.
     
  17. wahchai305

    wahchai305 Regular Member

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    as an umpire, i dont like the crowd noise - it prevents me from picking up the "double hit" in doubles/mx matches.
     
  18. Avian Rodrigues

    Avian Rodrigues Regular Member

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    https://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/index.php?threads/new-badminton-format-team.188021/ ----- https://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/index.php?threads/worlds-first-super-light-weight-ear-muff-sports-helmet.188067/ ---- if players can't handle noise, they should wear something like a super lightweight ear-muffled badminton helmet --- for this team badminton idea, where noise and crowd cheering is more lenient, these helmets may be required...while the authorities or crowd control can maintain and regulate safe noise in the audience
     
    #198 Avian Rodrigues, May 10, 2021
    Last edited: May 10, 2021
  19. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    "Cho" is quite common in table tennis when Chinese players are involved. Alternately it can be "Hao", "Hao Cho" or "Cho-le". Translates to something like "good ball". Even when Hao or Hao Cho is shouted, it is not easy to hear "Hao" but very easy to hear "Cho".

    Have heard Cho or Hao Cho used to a lesser extent at tennis matches or badminton tournaments.
     

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