Badminton improvment

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Lau314, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    Someone that is kind enough too pin point out what i need to improve?
    (I am the guy with black hair and blue shirt)


     
  2. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2014
    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Germany
    For me, all of these videos are unavailable. Maybe they're set to private?
     
  3. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    Ops my bad. Changed it now! :=)
     
  4. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2014
    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Germany
    Let me preface a statement that your game is actually pretty good already; if I only mention negatives, please don't take this to mean you'd be a bad player.

    First and foremost, I'd work on speed. You are very often late to the shuttle, and many times the shuttle drops on the floor on your side. Both shadow footwork and overspeed multifeeding across the whole court would be very beneficial. If you feel you are at your exertion limit, general athletics training may also be a good idea.

    At the front court, you often take the shuttle at knee height, even when receiving. Although your shots are reasonably safe even from that unfavorable position, you can hardly pressure your opponents. This safe style is a valid strategy at lower levels (many of your current opponents make mistakes even when the shuttle comes at a leisurely height and speed to the center of their court), but the better the opponent gets the more problems you will have.

    On overhead shots, you have the tendency to have the racket to the side at about hip height during preparation of the shot, instead of at a ready position at about head height and upwards instead of sideways.
    This forces you to hit at a very precise timing, and robs you of power. Coupled with the tendency to hit behind your body instead of always moving behind the shuttle, this means all your shots overhead shots are defensive clears or late drop shots. With this technique, when you actually need to smash the timing is extremely tight lest you miss the shot.
    Even if you don't actually want to smash all the time - smashing would mean a much higher game speed, which fits neither your style nor your strengths at the moment - you should always strive to have the option to do so. Aggressive flat clears are also a very good gateway shot to get your game to the next level.

    If you don't mind me asking: Do you by any chance know what software they are using at this tournament? The hardware setup looks quite neat, and as a developer of an umpire / display software myself, I'm always interested in the other solutions in this space.
     
    Lau314 likes this.
  5. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    21,191
    Likes Received:
    3,034
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    Nice of you to post your games.

    It is often very helpful to try a little self analysis and state what you feel your difficulties are.

    What do you see in your own game?

    What were the scores in the matches?
     
    Lau314 and phihag like this.
  6. DarkHiatus

    DarkHiatus Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    Messages:
    1,197
    Likes Received:
    753
    Location:
    Manchester
    Only had a brief look now - one thing I've spotted is your receive serves with your racquet leg forward.

    This will make a good flick serve to your forehand difficult to retrieve as you'll have to pivot, chasse and jumpout instead of just a chasse+jumpout.

    I'll wait for your own analysis before commenting further!
     
    Lau314 and phihag like this.
  7. OhSearsTower

    OhSearsTower Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Germany
    I think your racket hangs too low. Often you make a big windmill move with the racket moving from the ground directly into the shot. I think this costs you time and reduces control of the shots.
    (and also it leads you to take the shuttles too low when playing the shuttle in front of you)
     
    Lau314 likes this.
  8. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    By my analysis i lack speed. My forehand defense is weak and most of the time i give a weak return on my forehand.
     
  9. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    The score against the red and black shirt guy was
    17-21 15-21 I won him in 2 sets.
    The other guy with same shirt as me I lost to
    21-17 21-7
     
  10. OhSearsTower

    OhSearsTower Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Germany
    I think physically at this state (without special training) you could be much faster with better attitude. Look at the shot in the second video at 0:04: you play a clear under a little bit of pressure and run forward to get the dropshot. Its a supershort sequence but it shows me that you can have quick feet if you want.

    Now see the same video at 0:37: already the way you stand to receive the serve screams lazyness to me. Full (no hunger, no eagerness). You actually win that point and show some emotion so i wonder why your bodylanguage is so bored while the rally goes. You stand upright and very casual when your opponent hits the shuttle. Especially the last shot.
    So if you can lower your stance and be more awake I think you can be much faster.

    Im a little bit exaggerating, its not too bad. But it fits together with the low hanging racket. Your bodyposture is too casual for my taste. It costs fractions of seconds which are super important (to get as early as possible to the shuttle). If I would stand casual like you I would be at 30% of my performance because im taller and dont have fast feet on the tiny court.
     
    Cheung, Lau314 and phihag like this.
  11. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    My coach always says that i am lazy on court. And I now understand what he means.
    Thanks!
     
  12. khoai

    khoai Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    44
    Location:
    US
    The one thing that'll improve your footwork reaction right now is split step or split jump:





     
    phihag likes this.
  13. guitar_pic

    guitar_pic Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    28
    Occupation:
    MIS Sales Consultant
    Location:
    Richmond BC
    Agree with DarkHiatus. You are receiving your serves with your left foot forward. If you were right handed then that would be correct. But since you are left handed then your right foot should be in front.

    I may be reading too much into this, but I think your current ready stance is giving a mental advantage to your opponent.

    In watching all the videos you posted, you are giving a very "relaxed" image when you are receiving. Also, with your left foot forward, and both your feet pointed forward as well, you cannot properly push off forwards or backwards. Remember since you are left handed, your left foot follows your racket hand. But, it's right foot that in most cases pushes you forwards and backwards when you start with the split step.

    Try doing this:
    1. Swap your feet position when you are recieving
    2. instead of feet pointing forward, tilt both to around the 10-o clock position (because you are left handed)
    3. Crouch down and bring your racket up
    4. get ready to push of faster either forwards or backwards once you do the split steap
     
  14. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    16,093
    Likes Received:
    1,723
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Agree with comments about the "lazy" posture and stance. You need to decide if it's a social game or a competitive game. If the latter and you want to win, you need to show and up your aggressiveness in receiving, pace, etc. You need to play with fire and hunger if you want to win. Now if you're just playing social games for fun, then don't matter.

    Another point not yet mentioned :
    you grip your racket too high in the middle of the handle. For someone like you who's not exactly tall, you need to grip closer to the handle's butt for added leverage and reach. Just look at some of the shorter WS players like Tai TzuYing or Nozomi Okuhara... they grip all the way down.
     
  15. guitar_pic

    guitar_pic Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    28
    Occupation:
    MIS Sales Consultant
    Location:
    Richmond BC
    How long have you been training? How long with your current coach? You have a lot of the correct technical abilities, but your coach should be able to break everything down and offer ways to correct it.

    Unless he has already done so (we fellow forum members would not know....) a general statement like being "lazy" on court does not really help.
     
  16. Lau314

    Lau314 New Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2017
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sweden
    I have been training for 3 three years and all those three years I have been with the same coach. He only says that I am lazy and I don't fight for every point. But he dosen't mention how I should change the things I need to improve. But I guess I need to show more hunger and eagerness. The problem is that I don't know how to show hunger or eagerness with my body language.
     
  17. phihag

    phihag Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2014
    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Germany
    Your body language isn't the problem (unless you want to play psychological games with your opponents), your mindset is.

    Try to get every shuttle as early as possible. Even if you don't show anything outwardly, every lost point should create some discomfort, especially in training.

    It may help to quantify your exertion: How about getting a heart rate measuring device (watch/armband/belt+watch)? Then you can see whether you are truly at your maximum. In a game, it of course depends on the opponent and pace, but during athletics training, shadow badminton, or even full-court multifeeding, you should really see that your heart rate goes to your very limits.

    A cheap alternative is comparing your exertion efforts to your peers: as an aspiring champion, you should always be the most-heavily-breathing student after any athletic exercise, no matter your fitness level. If you feel relaxed after an exercise that focuses on speed or stamina or power, you're doing it wrong.
     
  18. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    16,093
    Likes Received:
    1,723
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Re aggressive posture/preparation, a video is worth a thousand words...

     
    lotusknight, s_mair and guitar_pic like this.
  19. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    21,191
    Likes Received:
    3,034
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    You don't have the tactical attitude to take the shuttle earlier In fact, you are quite good but you will need to analyse your movement very very carefully. You can improve a lot by just doing some simple things.

    - Split step when the opponent hits the shot
    - Standing more crouched when the opponent hits the shot
    - holding the racquet in front of your body with the racquet head at waist height when the opponent hits the shot

    One thing really clear is that after you hit the shuttle, you have no idea of why you play the shot and what your next shot should be. You need to remember you want to move the opponent around the badminton court and make him move, not let him move. That means don't give him so much time during the rally. So, at your stage, when you do a serve , clear or lift up to the back of the court , make sure it goes right to the very back lines.
     
    lotusknight and guitar_pic like this.
  20. guitar_pic

    guitar_pic Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2006
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    28
    Occupation:
    MIS Sales Consultant
    Location:
    Richmond BC
    While I understand what Phihag is trying to get across I respectfully disagree with his opinion on body posture. In my view especially for Lau314's case, body posture means everything.

    If he has been training for the past 3 years with the body language that we see in the videos, then that is really hindering his skill and tactical growth. Setting aside how any opponent will treat you, the proper stance in serving, receiving serves, in waiting for shots during practice sessions is essential in training your mindset.

    Again, you have the footwork foundation in place, but the posture issue should have been part of the foundation training from day 1. The only way for you to be able to effectively change your style is to have someone constantly correct you and pester you during training.
     
    phihag likes this.

Share This Page